Nevada may not often be thought of as a state plagued by heavy rains, but some residents who are being inundated with severe storms that are causing flash flooding and mudslides might beg to differ. One recent deluge was strong enough to overflow the US 95 highway and shut down the road. The powerful current turned the median into raging rapids capable of carrying away people and cars. Of course, with everyone carrying a camera at all times these days, the horrifying incident was captured on video.

Unfortunately, two vehicles somehow got sucked into the surging water and were pushed into the stream below. According to bystanders, the whole thing seemed to happen out of nowhere, but people put themselves in danger to try to save those stuck in the out of control cars. Thankfully, no one was injured in this terrible incident. At about 1:29 into the video, you can also catch a glimpse of the mudslide first flowing onto the road.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 10 Comments
      Chris Westcott
      • 4 Months Ago
      What were the cars doing in the median?
        BipDBo
        • 4 Months Ago
        @Chris Westcott
        Going for a swim. It's freakin hot out there.
      dukeisduke
      • 4 Months Ago
      There's one Grand Marquis that, thankfully, won't be turned into a DONK.
      DNADave
      • 4 Months Ago
      It doesn't rain that often in the desert, and so the soil is very dry, almost like rock. So, when it does rain, the rain flows to the lowest spot, causing flash floods. When those floods cross roadways and areas where people live, bad things happen. If you check on the amount of rainfall associated with these storms, you'd be surprised at how little rain actually fell! In any case, these are very typical storms for the desert, and not something unusual.
      Kevin Dalton
      • 4 Months Ago
      At least it took out a couple of shit-mobiles.
      Kristopher Derentz
      • 4 Months Ago

      As someone who has lived in Las Vegas since 2001 I can tell you the actively market to the community to stay out of flood waters, 

      http://www.ccrfcd.org/2004billboards.htm

      yet every time it rains there is people driving in them. 

      This seems like they tried to cross the flooding section of the hwy and it washed their cars in the the median that is designed to hold water so the hwy doesnt flood. 



      Jay
      • 4 Months Ago
      Wouldn't want to be sitting in that Prius right now!
      BipDBo
      • 4 Months Ago
      Wow. My wife and I were just in Las Vegas and the various parks (Zion, Grand Canyon, Bryce Canyon, Antelope Canyon) last week. For two people from Florida usually accustomed to wild fluctuations in weather, we sure thought the weather in the desert was especially erratic. Our first day at the grand canyon had us in jackets and ponchos hiding from cold rain (perhaps low 50s) and hail and then a couple hours later, it was sunny and very warm, likely in the mid 90s. At Bryce Canyon, the day before we got there, one man got struck by lightning and killed an incident not seen there in 13 years. It was a wonderful trip overall, and I'm glad we dodged even worse weather.
        DNADave
        • 4 Months Ago
        @BipDBo
        Yes, when you were at the Grand Canyon, you were at very high elevation, and so it is colder there than lower elevations. This is also monsoon season and so lots of storms blow thru, almost every afternoon. Not unlike those hurricane season storms in Florida!
      KGenesis
      • 4 Months Ago
      It's certainly refreshing to see video that highlights the good in mankind. Bystanders who are willing to stand in harms way assist their neighbor. Especially in a time in which people seem to be concerned with themselves.