If speed kills, then the logical conclusion would be that police pulling over speeders are saving lives. Whether you accept that premise or not, however, one patrolman in Maine actually did save a man's life when he stopped him for breaking the speed limit.

Officer Mike Harrington of the Kennebunk Police Department had stopped one Gavin "Scotty" Falconer for driving over the 25-mile-per-hour speed limit in the coastal town in Maine, when Falconer, 84 years old, collapsed over his steering wheel. Officer Harrington sprung into action, pulled Falconer out of the car and initiated CPR.

Falconer woke up the next day in the hospital with his life restored... and a warning citation for speeding, which Harrington had apparently already started writing before Falconer collapsed. Watch the full story in the video here.


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  • 18 Comments
      beanrew
      • 4 Months Ago
      Rapid deceleration kills, not speed.
      g
      • 4 Months Ago
      "don't die! I can't ticket you and extort money from you if you do!"
        beanrew
        • 4 Months Ago
        @g
        ...and I haven't met my quota (ahem... "performance measure") yet.
      John Galt
      • 4 Months Ago
      Given that the only studies in all of human history that showed any correlation between accidents or deaths and speed were done by police using police statements which as the DOT has found are completely inaccurate and can't be used for causal links, no I don't accept that premise. More specifically every objective 3rd party study ever done with trained accident investigators instead of cops shows absolutely no correlation to speed and accidents or death. Hence, it's a tax, nothing more and this cop saved a life while being a tax man with a gun. A small condolence for being stolen from.
        beanrew
        • 4 Months Ago
        @John Galt
        Once while attending a driving school class at the court house (busted for driving 10 mph over the 50 mph limit coasting down a steep hill), I looked around and calculated the thousands and thousands of dollars that were being made from class fees that day (and every week day). It was a packed house 100+ and $375 for the class meant this generating nearly $40K a day, EACH day. Almost a million dollars a month...........But it's not about the money. If law enforcement was really law enforcement, then enforce all laws, don't cherry pick, lets go after some drug gangs or human trafficking/small arms rings.
          Mondrell
          • 4 Months Ago
          @beanrew
          "If law enforcement was really law enforcement, then enforce all laws, don't cherry pick, lets go after some drug gangs or human trafficking/small arms rings." Nah. Ensnaring motorists for going 10 over on a desolate road at 4 a.m. is far easier.
      Master Austin
      • 4 Months Ago
      I'm calling BS on this one. Uh, the one that CAUSED the heartattack was the Police Officer stopping him to give him a ticket. But we are spinning it and saying "Oh wait, wasnt he lucky to be stopped?" Hmmm No, the act of being stopped in stressful as it is, which CAUSED the heartattack. He should SUE.
        Bruce Lee
        • 4 Months Ago
        @Master Austin
        If you have a heart attack from being pulled over for speeding your heart was in pretty bad health and was likely to go at any moment so having it happen when someone who knows CPR is right in front of you is a blessing not a curse.
        11fiveoh
        • 4 Months Ago
        @Master Austin
        If you can't deal with a situation like that without having a heart attack, you shouldn't be allowed to drive a car.
        jtav2002
        • 4 Months Ago
        @Master Austin
        I really hope that is sarcasm. If the simple act of pulling over gives you a heart attack, you shouldn't be on the road.
      languedoctor
      • 4 Months Ago
      There needs to be a *rimshot when the old guy says "a warning . . . I can live with that." Regardless . . . well done, officer.
      Skicat
      • 4 Months Ago
      I know every a-hole who posted on this story would blame the cop—never the a-hole who was speeding. All you "enthusiasts" think you know better than the experts who designed the roads and set the speed limits (not cops), and the guys who are charged with enforcing the law. Guess what? You DON"T. I've know lots of guys like you in 42 years of driving. Those that haven't killed themselves yet have a few things in common: Multiple tickets, high insurance rates and more than one "accident." I don't speed, yet even in the right lane, I've got people like you running' up am back. Whatever makes you think tailgating is gonna make me speed up? Well, good luck, clowns. I'll be reading about you in police blotter or the obits.
        Mondrell
        • 4 Months Ago
        @Skicat
        Considering that the parties you've rattled off have sources in their own camps with evidence to the contrary, yeah, there's adequate reason to believe they're not as smart as you think. And it's rather ironic that you portend to taking the high road even as you assign those who disagree with you perspective into a generalization that's every bit as fallacious as that some have assigned to the officer. Tickets are no more of an indication of bad driving as his badge is to being a government thug; without a comprehensive understanding of the individual or circumstances, you're reaching.
        Dan
        • 4 Months Ago
        @Skicat
        You have a very narrowly focused view on the world. You're also delusional if you think most 60 MPH highways are designed for a maximum of 60 MPH or that being a civil engineer requires some magical brainpower the rest of us don't have. I can tell how fast I can or can't go by looking ahead or by knowing the road. A civil engineer can't pick a speed that calculates every factor, so they pick one for the lowest common denominator. BTW, I speed every time I get on the highway. I've never been in an accident, though I've sure avoided a lot of "good drivers who don't speed" because they can't drive for shit and think the speed limit has something to do with not getting in accidents. The speed limit is about damage mitigation, it is not about avoiding accidents. Get off your high horse and think for yourself.
          Mondrell
          • 4 Months Ago
          @Dan
          I've sure avoided a lot of "good drivers who don't speed" because they can't drive for shit and think the speed limit has something to do with not getting in accidents." This. If you operate with poor SA habits, you're dangerous at any speed. My last four 'accidents' all occurred at parking lot speeds (<10 mph) because the trailing driver wasn't paying attention. Each of them were liable. The one before all of these ended with the other driver eating a failure to yield citation in addition to accident liability since he pulled in front of me off of a collector road with a stop sign. My only at-fault accident was my first on account of not paying attention myself: I pulled an all-nighter to jumpstart my senior thesis and decided to go to work the next morning. Dosed off while coming to a stop for a red light and put it into the back of an '80s Ram pickup at ~25 mph. Learned to harness the power of the sick day afterward. One of the things I've come to believe while working for a company that is highly dependent on engineers to lay the operational groundwork is that you can't engineer out foolishness. If anything, attempting to do so further discourages critical thinking because people think the system will intervene, which culminates into needing more restrictive amendments because it often doesn't. I feel this way about the state of traffic enforcement.
      Charles Robichaud
      • 4 Months Ago
      I hope that really hot lady cop pulls me over when I'm haulin ass down Livingston Rd.!!! oh ya, giggity giggity giggity.... allllright!!!
      Michael Scoffield
      • 4 Months Ago
      I'm sorry but at 84 you shouldn't be driving. Hell, you probably can't even take proper care of yourself and need someone to help you with everyday life.
        jtav2002
        • 4 Months Ago
        @Michael Scoffield
        Driving should be based on ability not age. Some people at 84 could suffer from dimentia and not be able to take care of themselves or drive, while others at that age are still fully capable of safely operating a vehicle. But having said that I assume that you will be willing to give up your license at 84 even if you are in good health and capable of safely driving a car.
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