• Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
  • Image Credit: Toyota
Anybody remember the Ford Futura? It wasn't exactly a world-beater of a car, so we don't think the name Toyota's has apparently chosen for its first production fuel-cell vehicle is a tribute of sorts. Though one never knows. Maybe Toyota just likes 18-inch-tall EVs.

The Japanese automaker has apparently settled on a nameplate for its fuel-cell model, and the name will be "Mirai," which means "future" in Japanese, Bloomberg News says, citing a person familiar with the process that it didn't identify. Bloomberg couldn't get anyone with Toyota to comment on record about the name – and neither could AutoblogGreen – but we do remember that Toyota has bandied this name about before, so we're not setting anything down in stone quite yet.

Last month, Toyota said the new fuel cell car would debut in Japan next April and would be priced at about $69,000 before any sort of government incentives kicked in. The company hasn't revealed details about a US release date or pricing here, but indicated that US sales would start where there's already some semblance of a hydrogen-refueling infrastructure. That pretty much means California and nowhere else in the states. The fuel-cell model is said to have a full-tank range of about 435 miles and that the tank can be filled up in about three minutes, similar to a gas-powered vehicle. In other words, the future.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 30 Comments
      Koenigsegg
      • 1 Month Ago
      Wouldn't spend a penny on a toyota... let alone $70,000? ROFLLLL LAUGHING MY ASS OFF
      Koenigsegg
      • 1 Month Ago
      If this is the future then its looking ugly
        Letstakeawalk
        • 1 Month Ago
        @Koenigsegg
        I can agree with this. I think Honda's FCV concept looks much, much better.
          Grendal
          • 1 Month Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          I agree. That is a good looking car IMO. This, to me, looks like a baleen whale in much the way the Leaf looks like a catfish.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 1 Month Ago
      "The fuel-cell model is said to have a full-tank range of about 435 miles..." Toyota claims this on their official page, but a 300-mile range has also been reported. No doubt there is a discrepancy due to the different methodologies used by testing agencies.
        JakeY
        • 1 Month Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        435 miles is on the JC08 cycle (Leaf gets 141 miles on the same cycle, 84 on the EPA) so expect about 260 miles on the EPA cycle. http://www.caranddriver.com/news/toyota-fcv-concept-news
          Joeviocoe
          • 1 Month Ago
          @JakeY
          @ Letstakeawalk --"Hyundai is under-promising, and over-delivering" The same Hyundai which had to pay out $400,000,000 in a class action lawsuit for exaggerated MPG claims?? Wow, the marketing opiates certainly work on some people.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Month Ago
          @JakeY
          We will just have to wait and see what happens real-world in terms of economy. The Hyundai Tuscon FCV (EPA est 265-mile range) recently set a distance record in an independent test: "An independent test has shown Hyundai's fuel-cell offering can cover up to 435 miles on a tank of hydrogen..." http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1093227_hyundai-tucson-fuel-cell-covers-435-miles-on-single-tank-of-hydrogen
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Month Ago
          @JakeY
          From the Tesla hyper-milers: "Metcalf said in an interview that he averaged 25 or 26 miles an hour, with a top speed around 37 m.p.h." The Hyundai FCV had an average speed almost double that: "The journey took in a mix of city and highway driving, and the pair's eventual average speed was just over 47 mph over the ten-hour journey. The Tesla drivers had to slow down considerably to get their 400 miles, while the Hyundai FCV was driven in a much more regular fashion.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Month Ago
          @JakeY
          "It really seems like you're taking a hypermiling result as a meaningful fuel economy value." I'm sorry if it comes off that way. I'm merely suggesting that the EPA estimates might be misleadingly low. I would really like to have more real-world data to shed some light on this. Certainly, you are correct about Tesla. They didn't over-deliver in their range compared to their promised range. JakeY addressed that in his comment that EV makers shouldn't be forgiven for touting "unrealistic" numbers.
          GoodCheer
          • 1 Month Ago
          @JakeY
          "Hyundai is under-promising, and over-delivering" It really seems like you're taking a hypermiling result as a meaningful fuel economy value. That seems either silly or disingenuous to me.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Month Ago
          @JakeY
          @fairfireman21 The Hyundai FCV that set the distance record was driven at an average of 47mph. Sometimes it went faster, and sometimes slower. I don't know what the top speed they hit was, but it was certainly higher than their average. It would be very impressive to average 70mph over a long trip, although I'm not sure that would be legal in all places. Addressing your three points: 1. Thanks for accepting my premise, that the Hyundai has a range somewhere between 300-400 miles. I think an EPA est. of 260 would be quite under the true capability. As far as cost, well, it is a very early limited production example... 2. More stations are on the way. People are quite capable of deciding for themselves if the network of stations is sufficient for their needs. Over time as the network expands, more people could find that there are enough to make an FCV a viable alternative to an ICE. 3. I agree. The Toyota isn't the prettiest, but that's a subjective opinion. Prius are great alternatives. I've been looking at them as a second vehicle (I recently moved!). They are quite expensive, but the mpg is very appealing. Also, looking at the CR-Z, because it looks so good. The idea that the hydrogen tanks are less safe than any other energy storage device is unfounded. Pure FUD.
          fairfireman21
          • 1 Month Ago
          @JakeY
          Letstakeawalk, If they drove the Hyundai up to 47 mph to achieve the record then what would it do at 70 (REAL WORLD). Some Volt drivers say they have gone 1000 miles on 1 tank of gas (9 gallons). Let's look at it this way: 1. $70,000 for only 300 to 400 mile range. 2. 10 refueling stations in the U.S. 3. VERY VERY UGLY. Why not just buy a Prius for about $30,000 and have $40,000 left. If the prius got 40 all the time and gas was $5 per gallon for that $40,000 you could drive that Prius for over 300,000 miles anywhere just not around the Bay area. I do not know if you know this but the presure in those Hydrogen tanks are between 7500 on up to 10,000 psi. do you know what that could be in the case of a crash? A BOMB.
          JakeY
          • 1 Month Ago
          @JakeY
          The Hyundai PR is saying 265 miles EPA. EPA is the only consistent measure we have for US driving conditions (and even then it usually turns out slightly optimistic). "Real world" can be an excuse for inflated numbers (see the whole "100 mile" thing for the Leaf and the push back). We won't forgive EV makers for trying to tout unrealistic numbers, so we surely won't let FCV makers do the same.
          JakeY
          • 1 Month Ago
          @JakeY
          @Letstakeawalk I mean two completely things when I say "unachieveable" and "unrealistic"! 141 miles is "achieveable" by the Leaf (that's how far it went on the JC08 cycle) but it surely is "unrealistic". These 400+ miles claims for hydrogen cars is the same thing. There are probably some conditions where it is possible, but in an apples to apples comparison (EPA cycle) the results may be completely different. There was a recent crisis where automakers use optimistic/faked EPA numbers too for advertising (coincidentally Hyundai was one of the automakers involved), so using some other drastically optimistic standard is even worse.
          elctrNmbliT
          • 1 Month Ago
          @JakeY
          @Letstakeawalk And someone went 423 miles in a Tesla Model S. Hypermiling doesn't count toward standard expected range. http://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/12/father-and-son-drive-423-miles-on-one-charge-in-tesla-model-s/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0
          Letstakeawalk
          • 1 Month Ago
          @JakeY
          "We won't forgive EV makers for trying to tout unrealistic numbers, so we surely won't let FCV makers do the same." I agree. I'm only pointing out that the "up to 300-mile" range that Hyundai advertises can be surpassed. Hyundai is under-promising, and over-delivering - which is a great tactic to take. I wonder if Toyota is doing likewise in their range estimates. JakeY, even you have acknowledged that 400 miles is possible, but not on the EPA cycle test. "Hyundai previously claimed 400+ miles with this vehicle (which probably is achievable, just not on the EPA cycle)." http://www.autoblog.com/2013/11/20/2015-hyundai-tuscon-fuel-cell-la-2013/ It would be great if ABG could follow up on the leased Hyundai FCVs to see how they're doing.
          GoodCheer
          • 1 Month Ago
          @JakeY
          "Hyundai is under-promising, and over-delivering" If Tesla advertized 350 miles, and these goof-balls got their 423 driving 30mph, would you say the same thing about Tesla? I sure wouldn't.
          PeterScott
          • 1 Month Ago
          @JakeY
          And someone drove >1400 miles on a single tank of gas in a Ford Fusion Hybrid. Stunts like this are why we need a body like the EPA which provides for consistent testing, valid for comaprsions.
      goodoldgorr
      • 1 Month Ago
      I found this article. http://seekingalpha.com/article/2359055-toyota-is-picking-fuel-cell-vehicles-over-evs-a-smart-move?ifp=0
      SublimeKnight
      • 1 Month Ago
      Maybe Shippai was already taken.
      toyolla2
      • 1 Month Ago
      Anyone else see the irony in the name " Future" ? If not, know that there are those who believe FCEV cars are in the future - and will continue to be.
      danfred311
      • 1 Month Ago
      facepalm
      • 1 Month Ago
      If you think we do not have to worry about world oil reserves watch this. "Crude Awakening" on YouTube. Note the people being interviewed and who they are! "Crude Awakening" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qGM9ypR-UI
      Koenigsegg
      • 1 Month Ago
      I want this car! .... said no one ever
      Spec
      • 1 Month Ago
      The fuel of the Mirai . . . and always will be. ;-)
      goodoldgorr
      • 1 Month Ago
      Im awaiting big sales, this is a nice car, it will help depollute the air contrary to my actual car that is polluting the air unfortunately but I need it and there is no fuelcell car for sale in my area.
        Ele Truk
        • 1 Month Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        Unless you are in the L.A. area, there also is no refuel station near you.
        Koenigsegg
        • 1 Month Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        if you think this is a nice car then you have great taste.... NOT
      Letstakeawalk
      • 1 Month Ago
      A minor detail, but nice to see it reported. Can't wait for the first test-drives!
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