Should we all be laying our chips down on Nevada for Tesla's proposed Gigafactory? At least a few news sources are saying yes, though another says there's a remote chance of a San Francisco Bay Area site getting the nod. Real remote.

The frontrunner appears to be the Tahoe-Reno Industrial Center, which is about 20 miles east of Reno proper and includes warehousing sites for Walmart, Dell and Petsmart, Transport Evolved says. Compared to other states in the running, Nevada has the advantages of lower taxes, lots of cheap real estate and some lithium-mining capabilities, while the specific site has very good highway and rail access. There's also already a li-ion company there, Dragonfly Energy.

Feeding that belief is the sight of about 50 earthmoving trucks recently spotted at that site, says ValueWalk, Greentech Media and Jalopnik, in addition to Transport Evolved. But then we heard that the site had been shut down. Nobody involved is giving any clues, but the site is plenty big enough for a $5 billion, 10-million-square-foot plant that would support about 6,500 jobs.

Meanwhile, Tesla may also be considering the former Concord Naval Weapons Station about 35 miles northeast of San Francisco and 45 miles north of Tesla's Fremont headquarters, says KTVU, the NBC affiliate for the San Francisco Bay Area. The problem is that's a Superfund site in need of some remediation. But that sort of cleaning project could be a good fit for a company focused on "clean" energy. Tesla is, of course, declining to comment.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk said early last month that it was in "quite advanced" stages of planning for the plant, or perhaps two plants, and that the company was meeting on a daily basis with partner and battery-supplier Panasonic. The company is expected to officially announce the location of the Gigafactory later this year, and it could be up and running by the end of 2016.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 24 Comments
      Spec
      • 5 Months Ago
      They really need good rail connectivity and possibly good seaport connectivity so they can get materials directly from miners and other raw material suppliers. So the Concord port does have some advantages over the sites in that it has a better seaport ability. Materials costs will be a key issue. That and lots of automation are what they need to drive down costs.
        markrogo
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Spec
        The Concord port is not a real location. There would need to be Superfund mitigation before the project even started. There'd be threats of an environmental impact lawsuit delaying the start of production. Seaport access is nice, but if it comes at the expense of raw materials access (which this would, the materials are going to be sourced from North America mostly and those come from the mountain West and Canada), that's a small advantage.
      Actionable Mango
      • 5 Months Ago
      Honest question... why would the new owner of a Superfund site have to clean it up? Shouldn't it be the responsibility of the polluter?
        Technoir
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Actionable Mango
        And why is it called superfund? Shouldn't it be called a superdirty site?
          purrpullberra
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Technoir
          They are referred to that way because these sites were all put into one big group by the government back in the 70's, all horribly polluted and no longer able to be cleaned by the individual companies. Congress came up with a way to fund the clean up. It was called the Superfund. Places like this applied and were accepted and are on a list to be cleaned. Getting to them all is taking FOREVER. Occasionally a company comes along and wants the site so bad that they help move the clean up along.
          j
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Technoir
          What purrpullberra may have gone on to say in detail is that occasionally a company comes along and wants the site so bad (preceives a cheap way to solve multiple internal and site related problems) that they are willing to take on the virtually unlimited liability of a superfund sit.
      jphyundai
      • 5 Months Ago
      Reply to Grendal: Well sir, you are so wrong. However, the truth hurts. I feel it is my duty to my fellow man to ensure that they do not purchase such a faulty car. I dare you to disprove that electric range is reduced by 57% in extreme cold. If you cannot, then obviously I am right and you are wrong. Additionally, the Tesla has a very troubling habit of bursting into flame upon a hard object impact collision. I do not understand why you do not think that this is a problem. do you work for Tesla or own their stock? If so, you have a conflict of interest.
        purrpullberra
        • 5 Months Ago
        @jphyundai
        Your juvenile and pathetic rants are not making any of the points you hope to make. You are insane. Demented may be the better word. And you're hideously racist. You are wrong about Tesla. You are wrong about everything else too.
        Grendal
        • 5 Months Ago
        @jphyundai
        Oh. And thanks for responding. I do appreciate the response and you are slightly less than a run of the mill troll. So thanks.
        spannermonkeyuk
        • 5 Months Ago
        @jphyundai
        Easily done. Independent test showing a 23% drop at -20C, a heavily loaded car, and without hypermiling, and backed-up by the personal testimonies of several EV owners. http://www.teslamotorsclub.com/showthread.php/17881-First-European-Cold-Weather-Range-Test Your second point is ridiculous, as many people have pointed out already, but still you willfully ignore, which makes you a troll. Worth noting, though, is that gasoline cars have been known to spontaneously combust in regular operation, without any form of collision. Surely that is a bigger problem?
        Grendal
        • 5 Months Ago
        @jphyundai
        As I have said on numerous occasions, cars catch fire. They use large amounts of energy that is stored and used over the long distances. It is not surprising at all that cars can catch fire. Gasoline, as many people love to point out, is very energy dense which makes it a great medium for powering things. If you actually got 100% of the energy from gasoline your car could easily go more than 100 miles per gallon. The internal combustion engine is not that efficient and typically gets less than 25% of the energy from its fuel. Batteries store energy so it is not surprising that they can catch fire. It then comes down to what happens in case of a fire. So far, not one single person has died because of a battery fire related to a car. Not one single person has had a serious injury related to a battery fire related to a car. So what is your point, JP? That fire happens? Of course it happens. Fire is dangerous? Of course. Fires are part of being a human being. You cook food over flames. You heat your home with fire. You drive a car with thousands of small explosions. Fire happens. NO ONE HAS EVER BEEN HURT. So if you're honest with yourself you have to ask yourself why are beating this drum except to create Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt. I am quite willing to discuss the disadvantages of EVs any time you like. Are you willing to discuss the advantages of them? I didn't think so. Your history says that you are a troll. FIRE! FIRE! FIRE! I'd like to hear about your campaign against Porsche over Paul Walker burning to death in a 50 MPH accident or you are a hypocrite. Is a Tesla perfectly safe in every circumstance? Impossible. Driving any car is unsafe. I'm perfectly comfortable saying that a Model S is one of the safest cars on the road. I'd be willing to put young children in one. As far as the cold driving range thing, I'll take actual owners over your misinformation any day. By the way, you do know that gasoline can freeze under extreme conditions? So, are you posting on every gas car article how the car DOESN'T EVEN WORK in extreme cold? I didn't think so.
      jphyundai
      • 5 Months Ago
      Electric car range is reduced by up to 57% at 20 degrees F. Mountain driving reduces this number even more. Does anybody know of someone who has been stranded in their Tesla? Anyway, the driver could always crash it then warm his hands in the ensuing fire thus saving himself.
        Jim1961
        • 5 Months Ago
        @jphyundai
        On average there are 240 gasoline/diesel vehicle fires PER DAY in the United States but don't let that stop you from believing everything you see on Fox News.
        GoodCheer
        • 5 Months Ago
        @jphyundai
        I don't know of anyone stranded in a Tesla, but I got stranded in a Civic once when my alternator failed. My lights slowly dimmed as the battery drained, and then my engine started to choke because the fuel pump couldn't keep up. Hope that helps!
        bluepongo1
        • 6 Days Ago
        @jphyundai
        @ jphyundai making up easily debunked scenarios wont erase obvious problems with the NADA / hydrogen business model , also no one has ever been stranded in a diesel or gas car.... LOL !!!! Try to go anywhere in a hydrogen car without a hydrogen truck following you ... hydrogen spambot. (9_9)
        Grendal
        • 5 Months Ago
        @jphyundai
        Troll creating misinformation. http://hyundaielantrafire.com/HyundaiElantraFire.com/Elantra_Fire.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZyLa9ndQWU I notice how you never respond to any comments made to you. Clear evidence that you are a troll.
        Koenigsegg
        • 5 Months Ago
        @jphyundai
        Hyundai? LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL one of the shittiest car companies on earth. More hyundgays have caught on fire than teslas pal i think you are forgetting that. Warm yourself in your burning car.
        ElectricAvenue
        • 5 Months Ago
        @jphyundai
        I just drove to the top of Mt Evans and, obviously, back down. Total energy usage per unit distance was LESS than highway driving. Why? Because regenerative braking in the Model S appears to be very efficient, and the average speed was much lower than highway driving. It's funny that the EXACT OPPOSITE of what jphyundai is claiming is true. By contrast, ICE vehicles burn fuel going DOWNHILL while wearing out their brake pads. Now that is a joke!
      purrpullberra
      • 5 Months Ago
      Well I am stoked about the news that hopefully Texas is out of the running. The good points about that place can never outweigh the bad ones. Until tens of millions of 'conservatives' breathe their last they simply have too much control to entrust with something as dear as Tesla. Toyota? Who gives a sh1+!? And SpaceX would be better served to have a spaceport in Mexico. But I digress.... Cleaning up a Superfund site isn't necessarily difficult or time consuming. Generally they just need funding and someone with a will to get the job done. I wonder if Tesla has someone like that on the payroll.... Cleaning up such a place would absolutely sync up with the other values Tesla espouses. And if they built a factory in such a terribly disadvantaged part of the state and country bringing so much economic vitality there they would be an even bigger American dream factory than they already are. Building the first Gigafactory in Nevada makes the most sense but I believe Cali deserves the next one. I hope they get it !!!
      PeterScott
      • 5 Months Ago
      What will really be exciting is if one of the many alternate battery chemistries like this one pan out: http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1093530_new-lithium-ion-battery-uses-peroxide-to-boost-energy-density-by-7-times-report Imagine a Gigafactory producing batteries that have 4 times the current energy density.
        purrpullberra
        • 6 Days Ago
        @PeterScott
        One of the best things about the Gigafactory is that they plan to have research like this in house as well. Absolutely everything will happen there. Some people, not you, strangely think Tesla are going to build a factory that can only ever produce one kind of battery and that it will never be updated. But the opposite is true. If there's a great new formulation the Gigafactory will be able to implement it. That flexibility is a huge part of its defining characteristic. Can you imagine a Tesla with 1/7th the battery weighing it down!? So fast and fun!
      Robert Fahey
      • 5 Months Ago
      Update: The site crew is taking an intermission between phases, that's all. The update is linked about halfway down this post: http://teslamondo.com/2014/07/25/2641-portofino-drive-continues-to-beguile/
        Naturenut99
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Robert Fahey
        That's what I was assuming. That's for verifying.
        Grendal
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Robert Fahey
        I sure hope they weren't all fired. It sets a bad taste in the local community. That's not a good way to start a long term relationship.
    • Load More Comments