Maserati appears set to take a page out of corporate sibling Ferrari's playbook with the possibility that it may cap global annual output in the coming years. Ferrari announced in 2013 that it would limit itself to 7,000 vehicles a year to maintain exclusivity, and so far, it has stuck to the plan.

According to an unnamed Maserati executive speaking to Reuters, the Italian luxury car maker wants to cap its sales to 75,000 vehicles a year. However, it's hardly there yet. The company doesn't forecast reaching that production benchmark until 2018.

Dave Sullivan, an auto industry analyst for AutoPacific, thinks that limiting sales could be a smart move for Maserati. "If it is profitable at 75,000 and doesn't require a significant investment in capacity to get there, this appears to be sound," he said to Autoblog via email. "Alfa Romeo is intended to be the volume brand and by capping Maserati, it means that even if you opted to buy the 'entry level' Ghibli, you still have a level of exclusivity."

Maserati is on a spectacular growth path at the moment. After selling just 15,400 cars in 2013, sales are on track to at least double this year. Getting more units out the door should be helped by the brand's expanded model lineup, too. It plans to add the Levante crossover in 2015, a production version of its Alfieri Concept in 2016, a convertible version of it in 2017 and a replacement for the aging GranTurismo in 2018. For now, though, the still-new Quattroporte and Ghibli are making lots of friends.


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  • 14 Comments
      PatrickH
      • 5 Months Ago
      It's refreshing to see automakers not trying to ***** themselves out. Wish that Porsche would try adhering to this line of thinking.
        Michael Scoffield
        • 5 Months Ago
        @PatrickH
        Don't forget the biggest prostitute of them all, BMW.
          rsxvue
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Michael Scoffield
          While I don't deny's BMW's guilt of going downmarket (and at a rapid pace) they don't have the luxury (no pun intended) of having a separate mass-market brand like Maserati or Porsche to incite growth and sales. Mini can't do it because it's a niche brand.
      Bill Burke
      • 5 Months Ago
      I've been seeing so many new Maserati's on the road here on Long Island, that I'm not surprised at this decision. With the infusion of Chrysler assets the brand has been totally rejuvenated and is poised to be a serious competitor in the global luxury segment. This is good news for Maserati and great news for Chrysler. This leap frogging of engineering and design development on both sides of the Atlantic means that full size Chrysler products will benefit from what Maserati can deliver and the spreading of developmental costs will help insure more focused and higher level product development. The next generation Chrysler 300 and Dodge Charger will certainly see the Quattroporte and Ghibli improvements incorporated directly into the whatever Chrysler has developed. Maserati will then take the process one step further for themselves and Chrysler in turn. Chrysler has hit on the perfect synergy for it's market segment in it's relationship with Maserati and the brand will continue it's growth in the market. Dodge is developing a similar partnership with Alfa Romero and that might deliver even more surprises for American buyers. Oh, and the one ingredient that really stokes the fires of passion is that Italian connection. Lucky Chrysler.
        KaiserWilhelm
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Bill Burke
        I also live on LI and I've seen a handful of new Quattroportes and Ghilibs around. Plenty of upper class people here so it's not exactly shocking to see people driving luxury vehicles.
        Mudotaku
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Bill Burke
        I live in Brickell in Miami and Maserati cars are as common as Corollas.
      FIDTRO
      • 5 Months Ago
      Maserati is meant to be an exclusive brand. If everyone has one then they stop being so special. I think the cap is a good idea.
      Lawrence Selkirk
      • 5 Months Ago
      Smart move, Maserati! We bought a new Ghibli a few months ago and looove the car! A few fellow owners have been worried that they'll soon be at every stoplight ala BMW, but a cap should alleviate those fears and hopefully attract a few more sales in the process. Coupled with the decision this week to move Alfa from an entry level luxury to a full luxury car in the US, I think they are making some very wise decisions. Can't wait for Alfa to make it to the US...
      wooootles
      • 5 Months Ago
      Good for them, as a luxury car maker. They don't need to stoop down to making "luxury" FWD Corolla conquest models; leave that to Fiat
        ChaosphereIX
        • 5 Months Ago
        @wooootles
        agreed. Keep the brand separation distinct. Fiat Group has many marques that cover many segments, they don't need to compete with themselves. I am so happy to see Sergio's plan for Maser pay off, now if Alfa could have the same reception when they eventually get to releasing their new portfolio...that would be great.
      knightrider_6
      • 5 Months Ago
      Instead of simply limiting the numbers they should increase the price. Higher price will also make it more exclusive and make them more money.
        Mudotaku
        • 5 Months Ago
        @knightrider_6
        If you want to spend more money, the Fiat group has a car for you.
      quuppa70
      • 5 Months Ago
      couple of more years and its selling more cars than Alfa Romeo, thanks to Marchionne´s investments. Maybe they should change Maserati as volume brand?
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