Is Kia making diesel rumors a biennial thing? The South Korean automaker once again may take a closer look at making an oil-burner available for US consumption, JustAuto says. All in the name of fuel economy, of course.

Kia Motors America vice president Orth Hedrick tells JustAuto that the automaker may start selling diesels in the States during the next few years. Kia is getting ready to debut its Soul EV battery-electric in the US later this year, and with diesel powertrains gradually overcoming their perceptions of being slow and loud, the company may find a receptive audience in the US for these powerplants.

The problem has always been the inconsistent emissions standards between Europe and the US, but that may be resolved by 2018, says Hedrick. Kia's obviously encouraged by rising diesel sales from German automakers such as Volkswagen and Audi, as well as the fact that it just completed a record-breaking six-month sales period for the US. Kia spokesman Scott McKee, in an email to AutoblogGreen, would only say that "identifying new opportunities for growth is part of our long-term strategy" but reiterated that no announcements have been made.

Of course, there was a similar buzz during the spring of 2012, when reports surfaced that Kia would start making a diesel-powered Optima, which it provides to European customers.


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  • 35 Comments
      Sacto1654
      • 5 Months Ago
      If Hyundai/Kia can offer turbodiesel engines that meet the EPA Tier 2 Bin 5 certification for exhaust emissions, imagine a Kia Forte or Hyundai Elantra getting 45 mpg or higher on the freeway! :-) I'll take one if that happens.
      Scott Satellite
      • 5 Months Ago
      I traded in a 2012 Mustang GT on a 2013 VW TDI and I think the TDI is more fun to drive.
        Krazeecain
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Scott Satellite
        A Mustang GT? As in, a V8 rwd sports car? More fun than a laggy fwd diesel econobox? AHAHAHHAHA
        The Wasp
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Scott Satellite
        You say "VW TDI". It's a Beetle, isn't it? Cool story, bro.
      knightrider_6
      • 5 Months Ago
      @Matt Enough with the anti-EV talking points. Yes, a lot of electricity is produced by coal plants. But guess what - coal plants cannot be turned on and off to accommodate changes in electric demand. Coal plants keep burning coal at night when demand is low thus wasting a big portion of electricity they produce. That's why utility companies offer discounted rates for off-peak hours. Most people charge EVs at night using energy that was going to go waste anyways.
        Matt
        • 5 Months Ago
        @knightrider_6
        You need to Google "Base Load Power Plant". Coal plants don't "waste" any electricity; they are all used as base load plants.
        knightrider_6
        • 5 Months Ago
        @knightrider_6
        http://www.goelectricdrive.com/charging/utility-resources/pev-electricity-pricing-by-time-of-use-tou There is always surplus electricity available during off peak hours. Charging EV at that time prevents it from going to waste
      • 4 Months Ago
      KIA KOREAN FOR K KILLING I INDUSRIAL A AMERICA,USA....ONE IMPORT AT A TIME LOOK UP HOW MANY KOREANS BUY USA CARS YOU ARE IN FOR A SHOCK....
        Cameron Mousseau
        • 4 Months Ago
        thats because american cars arent reliable. you can polish a turd and call it a rock but it will always be a turd. kia keeping it awsome, kia keeping it affordable!
      Matt
      • 5 Months Ago
      Good, diesel is the only vehicle fuel type that doesn't produce significant amounts of particulate emissions in modern cars. DI gas engines spew particulates, and a third of the U.S. electricity generation comes from coal (high particulate emissions) so plug-ins indirectly cause more particulate emissions. Everyone talks about CO2, but many scientists think particulates may be the worst emission type for the environment and human health.
        mikeybyte1
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Matt
        Generalizing that 1/3 of electricity comes from coal therefore plug-ins are dirty is very poor logic. You need to get scientific and look at where all actual plug-in cars get their power from. I did not research it but my guess is many are using alt fuels, including renewables such as solar. I think you would find plug-ins use much less power from coal-fired plants than the average consumer. Furthermore, for those plug-ins that are using coal-fired electrical plants, how much power does each car draw and what does that calc out to for particulate emissions? I am pretty sure it is way way less than what comes out of a tailpipe.
          Neez
          • 5 Months Ago
          @mikeybyte1
          You have to be careful with "selecting electricity from solar", i find it funny that i can go to my local electrical supplier webpage, and select "where" my electricity comes from, and even pay slightly more for solar or wind. LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Sorry it doesn't work that way, everyone and everything dumps energy onto the electrical grid, there is no way to control the flow within your region. In fact, many power companies try to speculate how much energy is being dumped from other suppliers so they can ramp their energy production up or down accordingly. So in general, unless you're in a region that prodominately uses alternative energy for supply, like wind or solar, hydro,geothermal then most likely it's coal fired or nuclear.
          Matt
          • 5 Months Ago
          @mikeybyte1
          You can tell yourself that your plug-in is being charged by some wind farm somewhere, but in an aggregate sense, plug-ins definitively contribute more particulate emissions than diesels in the U.S. http://www2.cec.org/site/PPE/content/particulate-matter-emissions-0
        Krazeecain
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Matt
        Coal power plants have strict emmision regulations, and have large exhaust filters that absorb not only particulates, but even some of the CO2 for sequestration as well.
        Chris O.
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Matt
        I suppose it goes to your definition of "significant". DPM (or DEP, if you're old-school) is produced by all diesel engines, and it is a significant health hazard. If you're using DEF or DPF in your exhaust treatment, then the DPM levels are reduced quite a bit. However, there are a lot of vehicles on the road in the US that predate the control of DPM (2007). Switching to a low-sulphur diesel doesn't suddenly make pre-2007 vehicles "clean". You do have a point about sooting from gasoline DI engines. I don't think it will be too long before there are particulate filters on GDI-equipped cars.
        hokkaido76
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Matt
        Oh look, another diesel evangelist................ The facts are that diesels are dirtier than gas engines and produce more emissions in the form of CO2 and NOX. Stop pretending that diesel is some magical, cure-all fuel that emits nothing but rainbows and unicorn farts.
          Krazeecain
          • 5 Months Ago
          @hokkaido76
          Hokkaido, you can't beat BS with BS. Matt's comments about coal and Ev's are tired anti-ev rhetoric, but diesels do NOT pollute more than gas engines. Especially in regards to CO2, that's just basic chemistry. Fuel consumption is almost directly relative to CO2 emissions, and I think you can at least agree that diesels are more fuel efficient than gas engines...
          Matt
          • 5 Months Ago
          @hokkaido76
          I didn't say anything about "rainbows" or "unicorn farts". I was talking about particulates, and you didn't present any evidence to dispute my claim that diesel has the lowest particulate emissions of any fuel type.
      mitytitywhitey
      • 5 Months Ago
      Rabble rabble! Autoblog green? Diesel? Rabble rabble!
      winford82
      • 5 Months Ago
      I wish Hyundai/Kia would bring a diesel to the market, preffarably in the new Genesisor K900. I would sell my Passat TDI in a heartbeat.
      Scr
      • 5 Months Ago
      Hmmm. Am seriously looking at the Turbo Forte 5 door SX, but if they do the same vehicle as a diesel, that would change things.
      knightrider_6
      • 5 Months Ago
      Autoblog should stop putting diesel articles under Autoblog Green. Diesel is slightly more energy dense than gasoline. It doesn't even come close to hybrids, plugin hybrids and EVs. Look up greenhouse emissions on EPA website VW Jetta diesel: 297 grams per mile Toyota Prius: 179 grams per mile (40% less) Prius Plug-in: 133 grams per mile (56% less) This doesn't even account for the cancer causing particulate released by diesel engines.
        knightrider_6
        • 5 Months Ago
        @knightrider_6
        Owning a diesel car is a miserable experience. They cost more, fuel costs more, some need urea to prevent unburnt fuel from leaving the exhaust. They are loud, need more maintenance. Most diesel sedans and SUVs sold in US are made by German automakers and are inherently poor quality. The driving experience is just as bad. With less horsepower compared to a gasoline engine, they struggle to accelerate and have long 0-60 times.
        Tweaker
        • 5 Months Ago
        @knightrider_6
        Why compare across manufacturers? VW provides us plenty od proff that diesel is dirtier. http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=33819&id=33927&id=34167&#tab2 Energy and Environment page, click Show: Upstream and tailpipe GHG, State: California. There is no doubt that diesel burns dirtier in every way.
          wxman
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Tweaker
          And the diesel (TDI) version of the 2014 Passat has far lower emissions across-the-board than the 2014 Passat 1.8T, especially when taking the much higher upstream emissions of gasoline into account... http://webpages.charter.net/lmarz/emissions2014.html
        Matt
        • 5 Months Ago
        @knightrider_6
        All modern diesels have particulate filters, no GDI cars do in the U.S. GDI particulate emissions are over 10x worse than diesels.
        knightrider_6
        • 5 Months Ago
        @knightrider_6
        Most asian and american cars don't use GDI. ANY diesel engine is much worse compared to a Prius.
          Matt
          • 5 Months Ago
          @knightrider_6
          And a Prius is a soul-suckingly awful car to drive, unlike most of the diesels currently for sale, so it's not really an apples-to-apples comparison. The U.S. energy infrastructure couldn't handle it if EVERYONE switched to either diesel or plug-in, so it's not an either-or thing. Both are a piece of the puzzle until technology advances further.
          Matt
          • 5 Months Ago
          @knightrider_6
          And every automaker is in the process of switching to GDI. Even your beloved Toyota: http://www.dailytech.com/Toyota+to+Finally+Get+Onboard+With+Direct+Injection+Turbocharging+to+Boost+Efficiency/article27845.htm
      Jmaister
      • 5 Months Ago
      Just like Mazda is... or was.
      Avinash Machado
      • 5 Months Ago
      Great idea.
      Justin Campanale
      • 5 Months Ago
      Looks like we have a full on flame war between diesel fanboys and EV fanboys. I'll get the popcorn ready and watch the action.
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