Don't you just hate when your neighbors' mess becomes your problem? Toyota certainly has good reason to be upset, after an dirty mishap at a steel mill delayed thousands of vehicle exports from its nearby port in Nagoya, Japan, (pictured above) by as much as a month.

The messy situation occurred on June 22 when the mill near the port lost power and had to burn off an excess buildup of coke oven gas – which isn't exactly a situation friendly to living beings or the environment. According to Automotive News, it caused a massive amount of smoke to emit from the plant that fell as soot and tar on about 23,000 vehicles that were waiting to be shipped out. Getting the models properly cleaned off has been quite a task. A team of 5,000 workers were at the port until this week getting them gleaming again.

Potential Toyota buyers in North America have no need to fret about getting a sullied car, though. A Toyota spokesperson told Automotive News that none of the vehicles were bound for this continent. The automaker is reportedly considering asking the mill's owners for reimbursement for the cost of the weeks of cleanup. Paying for the mistake is, after all, the neighborly thing to do.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 14 Comments
      Hernan
      • 5 Months Ago
      Trespass to chattel. Steel mill should pay.
      RC
      • 5 Months Ago
      Who is going to pay those workers their health bills a few years from now?
      imoore
      • 5 Months Ago
      Do they really expect the steel mill to pay for the cleanup? Good luck with that. They can easily claim that the loss of power was not their fault.
        ScottT
        • 5 Months Ago
        @imoore
        And Toyota could claim that losing power is not an unexpected circumstance and the mill should have been prepared to deal with that event without damaging their neighbors. I would think Toyota would have a very good case, the mill should be responsible for making sure they don't damage their neighbors regardless of whether a power loss is their fault.
        Hernan
        • 5 Months Ago
        @imoore
        The power loss was not their fault, but the burning off of the excess was intentional (someone actually had to decide to do that) and foreseeable.
        1454
        • 5 Months Ago
        @imoore
        Yeah, but that still doesn't exempt them from a contingency plan. Most places like that have redundant back-up generators for a situation like this. Had they been prepared for this incident, then their cars would have never been landlocked and covered in crud. Not "expecting" something is not an excuse, especially with something as simple as power going out, it happens on a regular basis, and therefore should be expected. It's not like we are talking about an act of "god", here.
      knightrider_6
      • 5 Months Ago
      Japan is like Texas - blatant disregard for environment and safety regulations. Remember the meltdown of poorly maintained reactor?
        1454
        • 5 Months Ago
        @knightrider_6
        Oh, dear god. It wasn't a "poorly maintained reactor", it was a 500+ year Tsunami that was actually completely unexpected. Please shut up. Also, if Japan is so regulation adverse then why is it that their air quality is sooooo much better than china's bigger cities? Please do the world a favor and....Pull.....The.....Trigger. Please.
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