Thanks to the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), when car shoppers look at horsepower and torque figures on vehicles, they know that all the automakers are calculating them the same way. However, that isn't the case when it comes to truck buyers and max towing capacity ratings because each company figures the value differently. That practice finally changes with the SAE's standardized J2807 system, though, and Ram Truck is the first one to apply the new test procedure to its entire light- and heavy-duty pickup range.

All models of the Ram 1500, 2500 and 3500 use the new, standardized rating for the 2015 model year, but buyers might not notice too much difference. According to the company, in 99 percent of cases the max towing weights are unchanged or even improve slightly from last year. That's a strong result compared to the 2015 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra that are seeing few increases but mostly decreases under the new testing procedure.

"For too long, an uneven playing field existed and towing capacities went unchecked. We're happy to be the only pickup truck manufacturer to align with the SAE J2807 towing standard across our pickup truck lineup," said Mike Cairns, director of Ram Truck engineering, in the company's announcement of the new specs.

The new 2015 Ram SAE J2807 towing capacities are as follows:
  • Ram 1500 with 3.6-liter Pentastar V6 – 7,600 pounds
  • Ram 1500 with 3.0-liter EcoDiesel V6 – 9,200 pounds
  • Ram 1500 with 5.7-liter Hemi V8– 10,650 pounds
  • Ram 2500 with 6.4-liter Hemi V8 – 16,300 pounds
  • Ram 2500 with 6.7-liter Cummins inline-six diesel – 17,970 pounds
  • Ram 3500 with 6.4-liter Hemi V8 – 16,420 pounds
  • Ram 3500 with 6.7-liter Cummins inline-six diesel – 30,000 pounds
Not only is J2807 meant to create a standard across all truck makers; its tests are supposed to simulate real-world towing for trucks. To achieve a given weight rating, the pickups have to perform certain tests. These include evaluations like a 0-60 miles per hour time allowance, the ability to climb a grade without dipping below a certain speed and some handling checks. Once all of the companies are using J2807, buyers should have a far more accurate idea of towing performance. Scroll down to watch a video of Ram touting its new numbers and read the company's official release.



Show full PR text
Ram Truck Announces Industry's Broadest Alignment with Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J2807 Towing Standards Across All Pickup Truck Segments

• Ram Truck is the only full-size pickup truck manufacturer to adopt the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J2807 towing practices in all three pickup truck segments (1/2-ton, ¾- ton and 1-ton)

• Ram pickup maximum towing capacities unchanged or improved under SAE standardized J2807

• Ram 1500 owns the top positions in pickup fuel economy and SAE affirmed towing capacity for V-6 engines

• Ram 1500 3.0-liter V-6 EcoDiesel with 8-speed transmission combines best-in-class fuel economy of 28 MPG with up to 9,200 lbs. of towing capacity

• Ram 1500 3.6-liter V-6 Pentastar with 8-speed transmission combines best-in-class gasoline engine fuel economy of 25 MPG with 7,600 lbs. of towing capacity

• Ram 1500 offers SAE towing of up to 10,650 lbs. with 5.7-liter HEMI V-8 and exclusive 8-speed transmission

• Ram 2500 Heavy Duty retains the highest level of capability with best-in-class SAE towing of 17,970 lbs. and a payload capacity of 3,970 lbs.

• Largest displacement V-8 in the Heavy Duty segment, 6.4-liter HEMI® delivers best-in-class 410 horsepower and 429 lb.-ft. of torque and features VVT with Fuel Saver cylinder deactivation

• Ram 3500 Heavy Duty is King of the Hill with best-in-class SAE 30,000 lbs. of towing capacity backed by 6.7-liter Cummins Turbo Diesel producing 385 horsepower and 850 lb.-ft. of torque

• All Ram trucks feature an unsurpassed powertrain warranty – five years/100,000 miles


Beginning with the 2015 model year, Ram will become the first automaker to adopt the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J2807 standardized tow rating practices across all three fullsize pickup truck segments, including the ½-ton Ram 1500, ¾-ton Ram 2500 Heavy Duty and one-ton "King of the Hill" Ram 3500 Heavy Duty.

Ram beats the competition in the two most sought-after titles in the pickup truck market, fuel economy and SAE towing capacity, offering the most capable and most fuel efficient trucks available.

"Because our customers asked for it, every single 2015 model year pickup truck Ram sells will come with a trailer-tow rating achieved using SAE's J2807 testing protocols," said Reid Bigland, President and CEO – Ram Truck Brand. "No other automaker can make that claim."

On the heels of finalized SAE towing specifications that now include trucks up to 14,000 GVWR, Ram has validated its full pickup line with the SAE J2807 Towing Standard – the only truck maker to adopt the standard in all three pickup truck weight classes.

"Ram Truck has been preparing for integration of the SAE towing standard over the past few years and adding heavier ¾ and 1-ton trucks to the criteria gives it more teeth," said Mike Cairns, Director- Ram Truck Engineering, Chrysler Group LLC. "For too long, an uneven playing field existed and towing capacities went unchecked. We're happy to be the only pickup truck manufacturer to align with the SAE J2807 towing standard across our pickup truck line up."

The SAE J2807 towing standard outlines dynamic and performance criteria as it relates to a given vehicle. Examples within the standard include a number of tests while towing: 0-60 MPH time allowance, tackling the notorious Davis Dam Grade while maintaining no less than 40 MPH for single-rear-wheel trucks and 35 MPH for dual-rear-wheel trucks, a constant radius understeer test while increasing speed and a sway maneuver using aggressive steering input. The purpose is to put all trucks through the schedule of tests in which operators will likely see in the real world. SAE standards have existed in a number of other areas including engine torque and horsepower. Ram Truck is the first to adopt the official towing standard for ½-ton, ¾-ton and 1-ton trucks.

2015 Ram SAE J2807 towing capacities:

Ram 1500 V-6 with 3.6-liter gasoline Pentastar – Unsurpassed 7,600 pounds
Ram 1500 V-6 with 3.0-liter EcoDiesel – Best-in-class 9,200 pounds
Ram 1500 V-8 with 5.7-liter gasoline HEMI – 10,650 pounds
Ram 2500 V-8 with 6.4-liter gasoline HEMI – 16,300 pounds
Ram 2500 with 6.7-liter Cummins diesel – Best-in-class 17,970 pounds
Ram 3500 V-8 with 6.4-liter gasoline HEMI – 16,420 pounds
Ram 3500 with 6.7-liter Cummins diesel – Best-in-class 30,000 pounds

Ram Truck Brand
Since its launch as a stand-alone division of Chrysler Group LLC in 2009, the Ram Truck Brand has steadily emerged as an industry leader with one goal: to build the best pickup trucks and commercial vehicles in the industry.

Creating a distinct identity for Ram Trucks has allowed the brand to concentrate on core customers and features they find valuable. Whether focusing on a family that uses a Ram 1500 day in and day out, a hard-working Ram 3500 Heavy Duty owner or a business that depends on its Ram ProMaster commercial van every day for deliveries, Ram has the truck market covered.

In order to be the best, it takes a commitment to innovation, capability, efficiency and durability. Ram Truck continues to invest substantially in its products, infusing them with great looks, refined interiors, durable engines and exclusive features that further enhance their capabilities.

Moving into the 2015 model year, Ram continues to beat the competition in the two most sought-after titles, fuel economy and towing capacity.
• Best-in-class fuel economy with exclusive EcoDiesel - 28 mpg with Ram 1500
• Best-in-class towing capability - 30,000 pounds with Ram 3500

Truck customers, from half-ton to commercial, have a demanding range of needs and require their vehicles to provide high levels of capability. Ram trucks are designed to deliver a total package.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 52 Comments
      Bernard
      • 5 Months Ago
      30,000 pounds? Shouldn't you just get a semi at that point?
        RobG
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Bernard
        If you tow regularly, sure, you're probably better off using a true medium-duty truck like an FL70 (btw those things cost new upwards of $250k), but for occasional towing, why not? Besides, for regular folks who won't use these commercially, it's a huge cost savings, because insuring a medium duty truck can get expensive.
      HVH20
      • 5 Months Ago
      So the Ram 3500 can tow 3 1500s backwards...
        • 5 Months Ago
        @HVH20
        Dummy, try 6 of them backwards.
      Flash!
      • 5 Months Ago
      Payload is still going to be the limiting factor for most of these trucks, but it's nice to see more manufacturers using the standard.
      Clark
      • 5 Months Ago
      Sorry Ram, but the tractor has better lines. You look like a sucker fish.
      Michael
      • 4 Months Ago
      What data exists to match the buyers of these high-tow-capacity vehicles with their actual use in towing vs total use? Buying a massive truck, because one takes a boat to the lake four times a year seems silly but sadly predictable, when fuel is as cheap as it is.
      That Guy
      • 5 Months Ago
      Ford isn't going to like this. Their so called "trucks" are going to drop substantially. That's good because now Ford can't just make numbers up (like they do with fuel economy), and they can't purposely make one engine look worse so another one sells better.
        jtav2002
        • 5 Months Ago
        @That Guy
        Any drop by ANY manufacturer would likely be in the couple hundred pounds range, and that's assuming they don't engineer the 2015 model to be able to tow more than current to make up for any "loss" from the new standard.
          Carpinions
          • 5 Months Ago
          @jtav2002
          Correct. GM only lost a few hundred pounds in all configs, and went up 500 on the top-of-the-line model.
      Revis Goodworth
      • 5 Months Ago
      It should not be surprising that Total Recall Motors has had to restate their figures downward while RAM has not - TRM has long taken light duty trucks and done the least amount of work possible to be able to slap an HD label on the product. In most cases the only thing HD about a Chevrolet or GMC pickup has been the added cost that is charged. In other news, Honduh has had to restate the towing capacity of its truck with covered catbox in the cargo bed to a new low - being able to tow a big wheel.
        l9t8z
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Revis Goodworth
        Uuuh, have you ever used a HD GM truck for actual work. My guess is no, your yet another career automotive forum commenter who probably lives with their mom and doesnt even own a car. Your comments however are entertaining, I will give you that. Baseless, but entertaining.
          Carpinions
          • 5 Months Ago
          @l9t8z
          He's a known troll, one of the top 3 on this site. I almost never respond directly to him any longer because he just says flatly untrue things that don't even rise to the level of having to be fact checked. Just ignore.
          Carpinions
          • 5 Months Ago
          @l9t8z
          @ carguy1701 FuelToTheFire aaron_mt
          carguy1701
          • 5 Months Ago
          @l9t8z
          Top 3? Who are your other two? Mine are aaronm_mt and Rob (AWD Corvette guy).
        cfphelps
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Revis Goodworth
        Compare numbers to numbers though, the 5.3L GM trucks can still tow more than the Dodge 5.7L based on Autoblog's own numbers between the two articles. The 6.2L can tow 12k lbs, something none of the half ton Dodge's can do.
          Carpinions
          • 5 Months Ago
          @cfphelps
          @That Guy "You shouldn't be towering that much with a half ton. Rams numbers are based in reality." Says who, if it's capable of it? Awfully convenient opinion given that both Ford and GM half tons can tow more, previous generation or current. GM's newly J2807-tested half ton with the 6.2 can tow about 3/4 of a ton more than the fully kitted Ram 1500. If a GM truck is beating your favorite, suddenly some magical gentlemen's rule is being broken? Also, calling these trucks "half tons" is technically very obsolete, since the GM "half tons" can payload 2100 lbs, a lot more than half a ton. Their 3500 can payload more than 3.5 tons in the bed being a "1 ton" truck. Ram's maximum 3500 payload, by contrast, is 6,100 lbs.
          jtav2002
          • 5 Months Ago
          @cfphelps
          Even though most of what he says is trolling, I'd agree with not towing a certain amount with a half ton. Even though some of the half tons are rated at 12,000lbs, if I had to routinely tow that much, I'd be in a 3/4 ton. That goes for any vehicle. I would never want to be right at the rating. Especially since so many people forget to consider other valuables that can add weight too.
          cfphelps
          • 5 Months Ago
          @cfphelps
          @That Guy, I don't necessarily disagree there. I tow a 27' tag along camper with a 1500 that fully loaded is in the 7800-8000 lb range and I wouldn't really want to go bigger than that with a 1500. However if the truck is rated to handle the higher loads by a 3rd party SAE standard, I wouldn't say it is necessarily bad to do so, the half tons of today are designed with much stronger and stiffer frames to handle the loads they are able to certify to. However, GM's ratings are now also to the SAE standard, so they are just as much in reality of Dodges, and with the data available in both Autoblog articles, comparing the trucks that compete against each other, the GM's SAE numbers are still higher.
          Carpinions
          • 5 Months Ago
          @cfphelps
          @jtav2002 Not necessarily disagreeing, but then that would also apply to Ram and Ford's respective 30k and 31k maximum tow ratings for their HD lines. So in effect that would make the everyday tow rating more reasonable in the 10-11k range for GM and Ford half tons, and in the mid-to-high 20k range for Ram and Ford HDs. On the flip side though, TheFastLane Truck tested a full-tilt Nissan Frontier crew cab hauling 6500 lbs (a couple hundred over its maximum rating) of boat, trailer, people, and gear up the mountain to the eisenhower tunnel in Colorado, and it acquitted itself quite well being an old mid-size truck with a comparatively ancient V6 and no factory-integrated trailer braking features. Got crap MPG, but it did it surprisingly well. If a Nissan mid-size can do that, I'm pretty confident GM's 12k rating on a half-ton has a smidgen of headroom around it while possessing trailer braking and more advanced drive train systems.
          That Guy
          • 5 Months Ago
          @cfphelps
          You shouldn't be towering that much with a half ton. Rams numbers are based in reality.
      jjmoonen
      • 5 Months Ago
      This is great news. Now once the other truck makers fall in line and standardize comparing these numbers will finally mean something.
      Abhinav
      • 5 Months Ago
      I thought Toyota made a big deal of them being SAE certified 2 years ago?? So RAM is the 2nd I'd think??
        Stuka87
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Abhinav
        Theya re the first to have it on all their trucks. but third to use them in general. Toyota had it first, and then GM did it with the new 1500's (and most of their ratings dropped). Ram has now done it on all of their trucks, and they did not lose any capacity. Which basically means their own testing was pretty good.
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Stuka87
          toyota had it on its entire line, the just dont manufacture a heavy duty to test. The Tacoma and Tundra both have used them since 11
      tcdesigns
      • 5 Months Ago
      So does this mean the 5.7L Hemi is no longer available for the 2015 2500 HD? It would also be nice if Ram would post their MPGs on their HD trucks too. It is irritating going to the dealership and seeing N/A on the window stickers on a 2500. I thought after the CAFE went into affect, they would have to post them.
      carguy1701
      • 5 Months Ago
      Now all we're waiting on is Ford.
        Carpinions
        • 5 Months Ago
        @carguy1701
        What I think is interesting is that Ford just uprated their F450 to 31,200 lbs towing (with the additional HP/TQ boost) even though the frame apparently is no different than the 2014 F450 (I'm assuming, since it's still the old HD platform and not a fully new one that would be forthcoming in the next 1-2 years). The existing truck maxed out at something like 24,000 lbs, so how they managed to extract another 3.5 tons of towing out of it is curious. Either they've been way underrating their old F450, or they found very minute tweaks that made it capable of towing that for 2015. Is the F450 frame THAT much different and stronger than the F350 frame? If so, why do the F350 and F550 tow ratings essentially remain unchanged for 2015?
        • 5 Months Ago
        @carguy1701
        keep waiting....
      rsholland
      • 5 Months Ago
      Does this new standard also address unbraked trailers? In the past most automakers have had drastically reduced tow ratings if the trailer didn't have its' own set of brakes, usually between 1000 – 2000 pounds max. Has that changed?
        Nemebean
        • 5 Months Ago
        @rsholland
        It's not even legal to tow more than maybe 3000 lbs (and much less than that in some states) without trailer brakes, so how is that number remotely interesting? Basically what they're telling you is that if you tow a heavy trailer without its own brakes you're nuts. In an emergency stop situation bad things are going to happen no matter how capable the truck is.
          rsholland
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Nemebean
          There is often a gap between what the vehicle maker states for in unbraked towing and what the state requires for trailer brakes. So if you have a Tundra, Toyota says if the trailer weighs over 1000 pounds, you need trailer brakes. If you live in the state of Maryland, trailer brakes are required for any trailer over 3000 pounds. That means there is a 2000 pound gap between what Toyota requires, and what the state requires. Should you have an accident if your trailer weighs 1800 pounds, you will have no legal recourse against Toyota if the fault of the accident is a result of the truck.
        Carpinions
        • 5 Months Ago
        @rsholland
        I don't know. What's the largest legal unbraked trailer these days? I see them, but they are usually quite small, single-axle and short.
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