Nissan Leaf electric-vehicle sales continue to grow. And the number of US fast-charging stations that the Leaf can use are growing, well, faster. As it should be.

Nissan has made good on its early-2013 vow to help ensure that the number of CHAdeMO stations in the US tripled by mid-2014, with Atlanta, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Dallas emerging as the most prevalent US markets, Green Car Reports says. In fact, the number of such stations, which can charge a Leaf to 80-percent battery capacity in about a half hour, has jumped to 633 from about 160 as of January 2013. About 180 are at Nissan dealerships, and that number should continue to surge since Nissan plans to aggressively add fast-charging stations through next March. Nissan spokesman Brian Brockman, in an e-mail to AutoblogGreen, confirmed those numbers and added that companies such as NRG, through its eVgo program, are also adding fast chargers throughout the country.

The continued increase is good news for drivers of the Mitsubishi i (okay, we admit, there are not that many of them out there) and future drivers of the Kia Soul EV, as both of the models are CHAdeMO-compatible.

Granted, the US has nothing on Europe, where the number of CHAdeMO stations has jumped to more than 1,000 from about 600 stations early last year. Nissan expects the continent to have about 1,800 fast-charging stations by year end. Still, the number of US CHAdeMO stations dwarfs the number of Tesla Motors' Supercharger stations, which total about 100.


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      Rotation
      • 5 Months Ago
      JakeY: I'm fully aware that superchargers provide more power. That's completely beside the point. You're right about the unused capacity. It does change the charging time efficiency of the system. However, that doesn't make the difference between a "true" dual station and a non-"true" dual station. You're making a No True Scotsman type argument here. No system that splits power is any less or more a dual station than any other. The face of the matter is the number of charging stations is half the number of probes in both cases. Joeevicoe: That's nonsense. It's completely accurate. I'm referring to the number of cars serviced by the chargers, that is the fleet size. I'm not referring to the number that use them each day. Okay. Maybe it's a dumb stat. I was just responding to your dumb stats about trying to say what's a better location or "more miles per charger". Let me explain what I mean by probe. By probe I mean probe. I don't care if it is an industry standard term. It's a refueling term. You choose your words, I choose mine. The connector is both the thing on the car, the thing on the charger and in some cases there are even more connectors along the charging circuit like in Europe how Mennekes works, or in the US when plugging your EVSE into a NEMA 14 and then into your car. So saying "connector" doesn't clear much up at all. So I refer to the thing on the end of the cord that you insert into the car to charge it the probe. It's like a gas nozzle. Deal with it. You're wrong about the one per stall. Early superchargers were individual stalls. On recent ones the power is split between stalls. That means you come up, start charging, go in to eat or whatever and someone else shows up and plugs in and your charge time rises. That doesn't happen with non-shared charging. Again, I don't need a reminder superchargers are higher power. LEAFs can only accept 40kW anyway, there's no reason I should be crying that CHAdeMO chargers aren't 135kW.
      Zerk
      • 5 Months Ago
      Link major cities. Chicago-Detroit for example, the only quick charging station between those cities is owned by Tesla. You would need four to make the trip. I really don't mind stopping for 20 minutes each time. You get a Leaf coast to coast and there's GUARANTEED increased sales.
      JakeY
      • 5 Months Ago
      @Rotation Actually no it doesn't. First of all, the Superchargers provide at minimum 30kW to one side (which is more than the 25kW some CHAdeMO stations are at). Also you are neglecting the charge cycle of the battery. What you are saying would be true if the battery can handle a steady state charge at the power rating of the charger (for example if the Model S can charge at 120kW from 0% SOC to 100% SOC). However, that is not the case: it tapers down. That means at the tail end of the charge cycle there is unused charger capacity that can be used by the car connected on the other connector.
      rick.danger
      • 5 Months Ago
      WTG, Nissan, yeah, put them all in your dealerships because that's where everyone wants to go to charge their car. Maybe you can expand and start putting them outside dentist's offices next.
        Rotation
        • 5 Months Ago
        @rick.danger
        They're not just in dealerships. http://api.plugshare.com/view/location/6060
        SublimeKnight
        • 5 Months Ago
        @rick.danger
        Put them at time share sales offices or maybe amway sales centers.
        Actionable Mango
        • 5 Months Ago
        @rick.danger
        I get what you are saying, but at the same time it's embarrassing when a dealership selling an EV can't bother to have a quick charge station for it.
          JakeY
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Actionable Mango
          True, but there should always be a filter to exclude dealer stations from the count because of the issues with them.
        paulwesterberg
        • 5 Months Ago
        @rick.danger
        How about next to the city sewage treatment facility or under the overpass where the homeless people live?
      Joeviocoe
      • 5 Months Ago
      I agree that Chademo should not be placed in the same types of places where SC stations are located. --"CHAdeMO charger service more cars because there are more LEAFs than Model Ses. By a lot." But that is not an accurate way to calculate it. Tesla has good measurements as to how many miles the SC network has enabled. Where are Nissan's numbers for the entire Leaf fleet, as to how many kwhs or miles enabled by Fast Charging? I would not just assume that because there are more Leafs, that their Fast Charging network is more utilized. --"By probe I mean probe." Circular. What do you mean? "Probe" is not an industry standard term (unless you are talking about a Multimeter). Charge connector? Because you are wrong, Tesla Superchargers have ONE per stall... and each stall is always on, even with other EVs charging.... at a power levels still higher than Chademo.
      JakeY
      • 5 Months Ago
      @Rotation The port on the car is a "socket". The plug that plugs into it is the "connector". I don't think that's too confusing. And I'm pretty sure Joe is referring to the connector when talking about other cars that might use Tesla's system, not only the socket on the car in this case.
      JakeY
      • 5 Months Ago
      @Rotation I said *in most cases*. Basically when the first car is out of the time window where it is at 90+kW charging power, then there is no difference in the charging speed of the first car even if a second car comes up (given the minimal limit is 30kW, where 90+30 = 120kW total). From the graphs I have seen, the charging power is only above 90kW for about 10-15 minutes: http://www.teslamotorsclub.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=39703&d=1388704028 "As to not splitting power, time-based slicing of power, even the coarse grained way Blink does it is still splitting power" In my view it is not because it is operating just like a single charger would (a single charger with a robotic connector would accomplish the same thing). I would expect any dual charger to offer simultaneous charging of some sort rather than just switching between two connectors. Since AFAIK there's really no technical definition for this, let's just agree to disagree with this.
      Joeviocoe
      • 5 Months Ago
      --"Let me explain what I mean by probe. By probe I mean probe. I don't care if it is an industry standard term. It's a refueling term. You choose your words, I choose mine." Once again... circular explanation is no explanation at all. Okay, so you mean "connector", or "plug". The thing on the car is not a "connector", it is a "Port" (charging port) or receptacle. If you are going to argue about something... you do have to use the right words, or else nobody understands your argument. We don't get to arbitrary make up words. And as Jake has already explained... the Superchargers do NOT behave as you have said. The peak power output may go down some, if there are other EVs charging... but they will not reduce anywhere near as low as a Chademo charger... so your initial argument is still wrong.
      Jon
      • 5 Months Ago
      @Ricardo I have never seen an i-MiEV or an i3. I see Tesla's literally every other day. Your and my accounts are anecdotal. The numbers are what matter.
      jeff
      • 5 Months Ago
      Although I think Chademo is a horrible standard and under powered, it is better than nothing I guess...
        Spec
        • 5 Months Ago
        @jeff
        I'm really starting to think that the Chademo & SAE-CCS standards war is a sideshow and maybe what everyone really should do is adopt the Tesla supercharger standard.
      Joeviocoe
      • 5 Months Ago
      Tesla Superchargers are not only placed in better locations for driving trips, but the "100" Superchargers in the U.S. is misleading. Chademo chargers are usually placed as a single charger and counted... Superchargers are placed with 6-8 chargers at a time. So really, they are about even as far as number. Plus.... Superchargers have 2.4 times the power, so they enable more miles per charger too.
        Rotation
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Joeviocoe
        Superchargers are only in the right places for long distance driving along particular routes. These Nissan chargers are well placed given the cars they are there for. What good would chargers 150 miles apart be to a car that only goes 75 miles on the highway (and less with a fast charge)? I agree about the issue of counting chargers versus stations. Although note that most Superchargers actually have two probes, meaning you split the power. So there are really only half as many chargers as you make out. Blink does the same thing with their CHAdeMO chargers, two probes for one charger. CHAdeMO charger service more cars because there are more LEAFs than Model Ses. By a lot.
        Rotation
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Joeviocoe
        Joeevicoe: Go tell someone else what words they can't use. Yes, we do get to arbitrary make up words. English isn't French. As to the idea that the charge rate was cut down because of temperature, I've charged my car in the central valley before. After having fast charged it 3 times that day already, and the pack was nearing its temperature limit (where it stops fast charging, not stops working). And it still charges at the same speed. Plus the Model S has better thermal control. There has to be another answer. Besides, you don't know what day this Tejon/Harris graph came from. For all you know it was 50F.
          Joeviocoe
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Rotation
          They chargers themselves have thermal controls... bigger fans in those cabinets behind the fence... so no, I don't know what day, or how many other Teslas there were charging at the time. Nor do we know if that Model S had the upgraded firmware for the charger (older firmware had different charging profile). I would like to see the thread where that graph was posted. Jake?
          JakeY
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Rotation
          @Joeviocoe I just found it with google images, but it's from this post: http://www.teslamotorsclub.com/showthread.php/23180-Finally-120KW-Supercharging!/page21?p=539550&viewfull=1#post539550
      Daryl A
      • 5 Months Ago
      Have two in the Miami area that at Nissan dealers that are broken. One has been waiting on a part from Mexico the other they are still trying to figure it out. There is also a the same charger at a park here that went down. Beginning to wonder how good these charges are and if there is any kind of service network for them. Beyond that the chargers themselves seems to be inconveniently placed and often blocked. So while level 3 charging is great for extending the usefulness of your Leaf (Great car BTW) if it's not working, blocked and you have to put up with idiot dealership people, why waste the money Nissan???
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