Whether it's Mozart, Beethoven or The Beatles, they all (arguably) pale in comparison to just the right engine note for many auto enthusiasts. Petrolicious has found one of the absolute best with its latest focus on a 1972 Ferrari 312PB.

The 312PB is important for more than just its ability to sound like an automotive symphony. It was also the final purpose-built prototype racer of the era from Ferrari before the Prancing Horse put its entire focus into Formula One. Maranello went out with a bang, though. The 312PB's design is simplicity itself with just a modified wedge shape combined with the necessary scoops and ducting to keep its 12-cylinder engine at full tune. The car won a string of races and scored the 1972 championship. Although even if it had been a loser, the racecar likely would have been famous just for its wonderful exhaust note.

In the video, Petrolicious expertly balances its interview with owner Steven Read with wonderful cinematography and just letting the Ferrari sing around the Willow Springs track. Crank up the volume and scroll down to get a wonderful earful of this sonorous vintage racer.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 9 Comments
      johnnyhedwardsjr
      • 5 Months Ago
      I could be out there driving that thing all day.
      Chayil
      • 5 Months Ago
      There is something about the siren song of a Ferrari 12 cylinder whether a flat 12 or V12. Having watched many of these cars race in person back in the day, nothing will stir the soul more than a Ferrari with a 12 cylinder engine. As wild as this car sounds, people should hear either Chris Amon's 612 Can Am car or a Ferrari 512 Prototype. Orgasm for the ears. And yes, they do sound like ripping sheets if one uses a little imagination.
      John Reid
      • 5 Months Ago
      Holy Crap Computer graphic have come along way. The only one that looks fake is the Lambo.
      Rotation
      • 5 Months Ago
      I will never understand the description of "like ripping sheets". People say it about flat plane crank engines (like Ferrari's 180 degree Vs) and I doesn't sound anything like that to me. It sounds nice, don't get me wrong.
        DC Mike
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Rotation
        It all sounded like exaggerations when I first heard people go on and on about how GREAT Ferrari's were. And I never fully understood the allure of Ferraris. I'd peel through magazines and say to myself how pretty they were but they just weren't "all that."... ...until I experienced a Ferrari track car ripping past me in the flesh for the first time. That MF was laying it down, HARD. I said to myself, "My god... I GET IT NOW." Epic machines that live up to the hype. You have to experience it in person, that's what happened to me.
      Joe Schmoe
      • 5 Months Ago
      The "Nurembergring?" Really?
      • 5 Months Ago
      Ah, can I have that as a ring tone?
      • 5 Months Ago
      Couldn't even come up with your own headline.. http://i.imgur.com/1ZLbLoP.png
      Just Me
      • 5 Months Ago
      Brought back memories of watching it blast by at the Glen. Great then and still great. Compare that with what passes for engine sound from current Formula 1 machines.