The battery pack is the single most expensive component in a plug-in vehicle and, until now, figuring out the cost to replace one has been a bit of a mystery. Last year, Nissan tried a $100/month price for a new battery in its popular Leaf, but was loudly criticized for that attempt. Today, Nissan is changing gears with a big announcement regarding the price of a new pack for your Nissan Leaf: $5,500 to buy. With an asterisk.

Nissan's Brian Brockman, writing at My Nissan Leaf, announced that Nissan Leaf replacement batteries are now available to purchase at certified Leaf dealers in the US at a suggested retail price of $5,499. These packs are the ones found in 2015 Leaf models, which are similar to the ones the Leaf has always had, just with a different, better battery chemistry. To buy a new pack, you need to give Nissan your original battery pack (which Nissan says will be recycled and has a value of $1,000) and the $5,500 "does not include tax, installation fees or an installation kit required for 2011 and 2012 vehicles." That kit costs around $225. A $100/month financing program will still be available (details will be made available later) but now it will have an end date and the driver will own the pack at the end of the payment process. All replacement packs will have the same eight-year, 100,000-mile warranty as the battery in a new Leaf. You can read Brockman's full statement below or over on My Nissan Leaf.

Ever since the Leaf entered the market in late 2010, Nissan has been dealing with degrading battery issue, both as a real thing (in warm climates like Arizona) and as a worry in the mind of potential customers. Now that we know how much it'll cost to get a new pack, we can calculate that the overall cost for a new 24-kWh pack is now officially $6,500. That means the price to a customer is less than $270-per-kWh. That's quite low compared to some early estimates, right on target with others and a very big deal for EV shoppers and drivers out there.
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Hi all:

I'm happy to be back to provide a long-awaited update on the Nissan LEAF battery replacement plan.

Last year, I posted preliminary details of the program that we'd created based on early survey data, and it led to spirited discussion (and very vocal criticism). So we went back to the drawing board with your comments and the ongoing guidance of the LEAF Advisory Board. Over the past year, we've used owner feedback to create a program we believe will better serve you and our other current drivers. Sorry we've been quiet on this topic. I hope you agree that it was worth the wait.

Battery replacements are now available for purchase at your certified Nissan LEAF dealers in the United States. The suggested retail price of the Nissan LEAF battery pack is $5,499. This price includes and requires a return of your original battery pack (valued at $1,000) to the dealer in exchange for the new battery. This price does not include tax, installation fees or an installation kit required for 2011 and 2012 vehicles. The MSRP for the installation kit (which includes brackets and other minor parts required to retrofit the newer pack to original vehicles) is approximately $225. Nissan expects the installation to take about three hours. However, dealers set the final pricing, so we recommend confirming with your local retailer.

We are also continuing to finalize details for a Nissan financing program for those who prefer an affordable monthly payment option, and we expect to keep that monthly payment in the $100 per month range. But to be clear, at the end of the finance terms, you own the battery. It is not a lease or rental. I will post more details here later this year when they are finalized, but we didn't want to delay announcing the battery price itself any longer.

These replacement batteries are the same battery found in 2015 LEAF vehicles, which are also on sale now at Nissan dealers. As a replacement, this battery is expected to provide similar range and charging characteristics as the battery offered since the launch of the LEAF in 2010. Changes in battery chemistry, however, have been made in an effort to make the battery more durable in extremely hot climates. (So, yes...this is what you've been calling the "lizard" battery.) We knew it was important to early buyers to purchase the latest technology. Holding the replacement program until this summer meant we would be offering just that.

Replacement packs will carry similar warranty coverage as a new LEAF: 8 years/100,000 miles against defects and 5 years/60,000 miles against capacity loss.
Below is a bit more Q&A on the topic that you may find helpful.

Thank you all for your patience on this topic. We've been hard at work developing a plan driven by your feedback, and we hope you're satisfied with the results.

Brian

--

Q. Will I own this battery outright?
A. Yes, unless you choose to finance the battery, in which case the finance company will have an interest in the battery until it is paid for in full.

Q. What happens to my old battery? Can I keep it?
A. No. The old battery must be exchanged for the new battery as a condition of the sale of the replacement battery, and Nissan's suggested retail battery pricing reflects a $1,000 core value assigned to the battery. Nissan will ensure that the old battery is recycled and disposed of properly or possibly reused as part of our 4R Energy business.

Q. For resale, how can I prove that my car has a new battery?
A: Your certified Nissan LEAF dealer will provide you with a copy of the repair order showing your lithium-ion battery replacement at the time the replacement is made. If for any reason you do not receive it, ask your dealer for a copy. Additionally, any authorized Nissan dealer can confirm the battery replacement by reviewing the vehicle's service history by authorized Nissan dealers which is maintained by VIN.

Q. Is the replacement battery compatible with all Nissan LEAF models?
A. All 2011 through 2015 LEAF models are currently compatible with the replacements being offered in this purchase program. However, a separate installation kit must be purchased at the customer's expense for all 2011 and 2012 vehicles.

Q. Who qualifies for a replacement?
A. To be eligible to purchase a replacement battery, you must be a current LEAF owner, and you must agree to exchange your existing battery pack for the replacement battery. You must also read, acknowledge and sign a customer disclosure form and trade-in agreement. In order to allow for battery trade-in, and as a further condition of sale, customer must represent by signing the disclosure form that either (1) their LEAF vehicle and old lithium-ion battery are owned by customer free and clear of any liens and encumbrances; or (2) that any lender with a lien on the vehicle and/or original battery consents to the battery exchange. Customer must agree to assist Nissan in obtaining a signed consent from the lienholder.

Q. What are the terms of Nissan's financing?
A: We plan to release the exact terms of the financing by the end of the year.

Q. Will you offer higher capacity batteries to upgrade my LEAF in the future?
A: Currently, we can only discuss the 24kWh LEAF pack. We are not making any announcements concerning larger potential battery pack sizes for future products at this time.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 198 Comments
      Chris
      • 5 Months Ago
      I have 318,272 miles on my 2005 Prius and haven't had a problem with my battery yet. My service advisor said they haven't replaced any Prius batteries at my dealership, but replacement cost if I will need one is about 2,600 and change installed price. I think I'll stick with Toyota.
        Technoir
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Chris
        Has the efficiency declined since 2005? How much power can it still hold?
        FordGo
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Chris
        I wish you'd get a Prius with a plug at least, and help expand those savings. But, you're doing great. I thank you, and America thanks you for helping put the Terrorists out of business.
        Ele Truk
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Chris
        Woohoo, $2600 for 1.3KWh of battery. That comes to $2000 per Wh, vs. the $270 for the Nissan. Such a deal!
          Joeviocoe
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Ele Truk
          Accidentally downvoted. Sorry. +2
      Technoir
      • 5 Months Ago
      If EVs will last as long as some say they will, then people may keep them for 10-15 years before buying a new one. The long life may become a problem for the automakers....so dont expect the battery packs to be compatible with all older models.
        Nick Kordich
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Technoir
        Manufacturers will need to honor the warranties for 10 years from the last car sold using a given battery, so if you buy a Leaf today, Nissan needs to be able to provide a replacement pack in 2024. That doesn't mean the company will necessarily maintain the format in future versions, so you're going to see old packs recycled with newer cells (not necessarily the newest technology, but something available in the market at the time) or adapters if the format hasn't changed too much. I think the bottom line is that 'incompatible,' as in using a remanufactured pack or an adapter for a smaller battery to fit an older car, is very different from irreplaceable, un-upgradable or simply unavailable, which's potentially where some of the concern is coming from, and something Nissan can address by making their availability clear.
        Joeviocoe
        • 5 Months Ago
        @Technoir
        "Fitting the replacement pack to 2011 and 2012 Nissan Leaf models requires a special $225 installation kit, which makes the new battery "backward compatible" with even the earliest Leaf models."
          Michael Walsh
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          An excellent move on Nissan's part (and something else the owner community has pushed hard for).
      • 5 Months Ago
      2011 Leafs already go for $10k wholesale/private all day long. In a year or two -- when the warranty doesn't cover the battery -- these things will barely be worth $5500.
        SteveG
        • 5 Months Ago
        Where? I will buy one today if you can find me such a car.
          Ziv
          • 5 Months Ago
          @SteveG
          There are 20 of them listed on Cars dot com under $14k, so they are probably selling at $12k or so. Even with just 80% of the original range (most of the cheap ones are in Southern CA, AZ and TX) that is a heck of a deal. Knowing that down the road you can drop a re-furb pack in for less than $6k? That is a nice market niche. The down side is that you are going to pay more if you live in a cooler climate, but they are still pretty good deals. I love my Volt, but I could see buying a used Leaf as a second car if I didn't already have an electric car.
        Nick Kordich
        • 5 Months Ago
        The first 2011 Leafs were delivered in December 2010. In one or two years, they'll still be covered by the 8 year battery warranty.
          Michael Walsh
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Nick Kordich
          The warranty you refer to is for materials and workmanship only, the capacity warranty is 5 years/60,000 miles (though there are those of us who are prodding Nissan for something more equitable, like a pro-rated capacity warranty).
          Nick Kordich
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Nick Kordich
          @Michael Walsh - My apologies, I just reread the section I referenced, and the range guarantee does apply retroactively to the 2011 models, which is actually a better deal than I had thought.
          Nick Kordich
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Nick Kordich
          @Michael Walsh - The capacity warranty doesn't even apply to 2011 Leafs, does it? I thought that only applied to 2013 and later. If that's the case, the warranty ovo17 could be referring to for the 2011 Leaf. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nissan_Leaf#United_States (scroll down to "warranty," third paragraph, just before marketing)
      sebringc5
      • 5 Months Ago
      I wonder if you have to prove ownership with a VIN#? Otherwise I say its game on for Jack Rickard from EVTV and other hobbyists that would rather make their OWN vehicle! I still think its a great thing for the entire industry. One has to wonder how this press release is somehow related to TESLA's own Gigafactory and there proposed KWH reduction! All the best, Aaron Lephart www.smartcar451.com
        SloopJohnB
        • 5 Months Ago
        @sebringc5
        Tesla Gigafactory is in for a rude awakening…the numbers just don't add up since the lithium cost itself is about 70% of the battery cost…and raw materials aren't going down with increased production.
          Dave D
          • 5 Months Ago
          @SloopJohnB
          "the lithium cost itself is about 70% of the battery cost" OK, seriously dude...are you retarded? If someone tells you they have a pet dinosaur do you buy tickets? Is there anything stupid you won't believe? LMAO!!!
          Joeviocoe
          • 5 Months Ago
          @SloopJohnB
          Two percent... 2% of the cost of the battery. You are in for a rude awakening... oh wait... all the EV detractors who said Tesla would be bankrupt years ago have already been proven wrong, and just continue to move on to the next lie spouted from Fox News. So what is next for you?
      Joeviocoe
      • 5 Months Ago
      ==== Autoblog Comments Enhancer (ACE) ==== https://openuserjs.org/scripts/joeviocoe/Autoblog_Comments Version Update 0.9.0 is now available: Features: -- Expand/collapse ALL comments and replies. -- Show number of New comments since page was loaded (in the title bar) -- Auto-Refresh when new comments detected -- Scroll to latest comment. -- Highlight and scroll directly through your own comments. -- Highlight the age of recent comments with increasing emphasis on newer posts. -- Scroll through the day's comments by age. -- Hyperlinks Added a few more User Options switches to handle default behavior when page first loads. Improved scrolling through comments by age. A bit faster now. Enjoy ... and as always, feel free to rate or comment ========================
      Joeviocoe
      • 5 Months Ago
      double sigh... I wish I could have access to the server to put in an edit button. I can do a client side edit feature.... but it would only show up for you.
      thecommentator2013
      • 5 Months Ago
      Where's the problem? By the time you have to replace a battery pack on a LEAF the prices will have gone down once again. In the meantime...no maintenance, or hardly any... Jees, people, get a grip. EVs are to stay and replace ICE on a large scale. Ok, I understand, it takes time to get used to it.
      PTC DAWG
      • 5 Months Ago
      Seems HIGH to me....
        Lasareath
        • 5 Months Ago
        @PTC DAWG
        Multiple what you spend on GAS a year by 8 years. How much is that? I used to spend $2000 a year on GAS, That's $16,000. If I bought this Battery after 8 years I will have still saved $10,000 by not buying Gas. Why do I say 8 years?, Because the LEAFs Battery has an 8 Year 100K mile warranty. Why would I buy a new Battery before that?
      eye.surgeon
      • 5 Months Ago
      Anybody priced a used Leaf lately? Their resale value is terrible as with EVs/hybrids in general.
        Joeviocoe
        • 5 Months Ago
        @eye.surgeon
        What other full production EV / Hybrid has bad resale value? http://transportevolved.com/2014/06/25/nissan-leaf-depreciating-quickly-can-grab-bargain/ There are specific reasons why the price is dropping for the used Leaf.
        PeterScott
        • 5 Months Ago
        @eye.surgeon
        Awesome. Cheap used Leaf, + cheap new battery = almost new car for cheap.
        Nick Kordich
        • 5 Months Ago
        @eye.surgeon
        @eye.surgeon: "Their resale value is terrible as with EVs/hybrids in general." Resale value tends to close the gap between hybrids and non-hybrids; the value comes in at the total cost of ownership. As a result, hybrids have been topping TCO charts and are an especially good value in terms of resale for the buyer. The seller's depreciation and fuel economy savings tend to cancel each other out, if they only keep a car for five years, but the used car buyer gets a car with a low TCO without as much of a hybrid price premium. The result is a good deal for initial owners and a better deal for used car buyers. Consumer Reports looks at the TCO (which factors in depreciation) over a five year period, and has named the Prius the winner for the last two years. Their top pick for full size car: the Toyota Avalon hybrid, with the non-hybrid version coming in second. Their top pick for luxury car: the Lexus ES hybrid, with the non-hybrid coming in tenth. That's the top seat in three of their vehicle categories and no hybrids occupying the worst value spots (at the bottom of each section) of any of their categories: http://static4.consumerreportscdn.org/content/dam/cro/news_articles/cars/CRO_BestCar_Chart1_02-2014.jpg
      Avinash Machado
      • 5 Months Ago
      Not bad.
      brandon
      • 5 Months Ago
      Don't get me wrong, you are 100% right. I'm just stating there are a few exceptions. I'm not down on the leaf at all. Other than the fact it is a hideous car, I wouldn't mind having one as a DD.
      Iamazing
      • 5 Months Ago
      You suckers didn't actually think that the Queef was a good deal, did you?
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