In the late 1970s, performance cars suffered a huge blow when the necessity for better economy and lower emissions crippled their power. It took nearly a decade for the horsepower to return. Today, we're in the middle of another push for greater vehicle efficiency, but don't expect another era of malaise this time. Instead, lightweight materials, turbos and hybrids mean that everyone can be happy. However, the pressure to clean up isn't just for the mass market, supercars must improve too, but Ferrari at least seems to be taking on the challenge in stride.

Ferrari Powertrain Director Vittorio Dini recently told Automotive News Europe that the Prancing Horse will improve its current average C02 emissions of 270 grams per kilometer by 20 percent by 2021, to reach about 216 grams of C02 per kilometer. To achieve these lofty ambitions, the company will exploit a relatively simple path. "In the future, all of our V8s will use turbos," said Dini said to ANE. Also, its V12s will use hybridization because it'll be a better choice for them compared to the heat of multiple turbos, he claimed.

The first steps of this strategy are already in front of us. The new California T ditches its naturally aspirated V8 in favor of a smaller displacement, more powerful turbocharged unit, and the LaFerrari is already using the hybrid V12. Dini's quote certainly lends some credence to the rumor that the 2015 refresh for the 458 Italia may use an even more powerful version of the California's turbo V8. With a new Ferrari model planned for each year between now and 2018, the Prancing Horse seems unperturbed by any threats posed by emissions.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 33 Comments
      Grendal
      • 6 Months Ago
      For Ferrari, this is more a PR move than really doing anything. You're not buying a Ferrari to tout your green cred.
        edward.stallings
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Grendal
        You are right on the PR or they would have characterized it other than in an emissions sense, but to the motorhead like me there is a performance gain to be had by more efficient combustion. I think it will mainly be due to direct injection. Mazda's Skyactiv has used direct injection with some novel strategies for big efficiency gains. For instance fuel can be injected late enough to avoid detonation allowing higher compression ratios or higher boost in the case of turbos.
          edward.stallings
          • 5 Months Ago
          @edward.stallings
          "I think it will mainly be due to direct injection. " I was wrong; According to Left Lane News the gains will be from Hybrid tech and turbos.
          Grendal
          • 6 Months Ago
          @edward.stallings
          Gaining performance in a Supercar makes a lot more sense than improving your green credentials. You do that the way that McLaren and Porsche did by doing a Supercar hybrid. There you get enough green to make your buyer happy while giving them a hardcore engine for the fun stuff and the showiness.
        Vassilis Alex
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Grendal
        I actually think it has more to do with European regulations.
      Ross
      • 6 Months Ago
      Phew. I'm sure they were worried they'd start losing customers because of conspicuous consumption of gasoline.
      Aaron
      • 6 Months Ago
      That's CO2, not C02.
        neilyadig
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Aaron
        Looks pretty strange to see it written like that. Kinda unprofessional, Autoblog.
      UnderdogSupporter
      • 5 Months Ago
      Couldn't they accomplish this by just adding cylinder deactivation to their lineup. I seriously dought a V12 will ever use its full power on the street.
      goodoldgorr
      • 6 Months Ago
      This is a bad designed car, It's too big even with the 20% co2 cut. I know ton of cars better then that and as a bonus it's cheaper and less polluting and already available. These cars are fiesta from ford, fit from Honda, yaris from Toyota or small used cars like my dodge neon 2005. These cars emit less co2, drive confortably the speed limit, have longer duration cheaper tires. They are high technology, no need for a Ferrari. Even if I won the lottery, I will stick with a small gasoline car, no need to pollute more then necessary and no troubles with speeding tickets. Also avoid leisure gadjets like motorcycles, boats, helicopters, private jets or airplanes, motocross, radio-guided hobby airplanes and helicopters.
        11fiveoh
        • 6 Months Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        LOL this is great. You just saved me a bunch of money! I was almost going to purchase a laferrari, but now I can get a fleet of 1,000 neons instead.
        stonehunte
        • 6 Months Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        Did you really just say your 2005 Dodge Neon is better than La Ferrari?
        thrutheeyesofbry
        • 6 Months Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        Thank god not everyone shares your opinion. I'd hate to see a world where we all drive 2005 Dodge Neons.
        mitytitywhitey
        • 6 Months Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        "Also avoid leisure gadjets like motorcycles, boats, helicopters, private jets or airplanes, motocross, radio-guided hobby airplanes and helicopters." While I'd like to think he's not being serious, there are people that actually think like this. I read an article about how we're not supposed to cook on the grill anymore... because of CO2. This is getting out of control. No wonder we're obese. Europe too; they are ready to declare obesity an EU-wide disability. We're all supposed to just sit around and watch reality TV. If the anti-CO2 crowd get their way, all of this will be banned at some point.
          skierpage
          • 5 Months Ago
          @mitytitywhitey
          "While cooking with charcoal emits *up to* 11 pounds of carbon dioxide per grill session into the environment, for example, grilling with propane emits just 5.6." One gallon of gasoline turns into twenty pounds of CO2, so a BBQ has the carbon footprint of a short car trip. Every little bit helps but it's pretty little. Your jump to obesity is an utter non-sequitur, grilling is neither an aerobic activity nor a weight-loss technique! The "anti-CO2 crowd" is everyone who understands what's happening to the climate, as a result of humanity burning billions of tons of fossil fuel every year. They don't speak with one voice despite whatever your right-wing bubble wants you to think. People concerned about the environment want you to pedal or walk short trips instead of getting in a 1.5-ton lardmobile, that's going to make a much bigger dent in your carbon footprint than tossing another shrimp on the barbie.
      IBx27
      • 6 Months Ago
      Who gives a $#!+, it's a boutique automaker, they should be exempt from emissions regulations.
        Nick Kordich
        • 6 Months Ago
        @IBx27
        I see your argument, but Americans like the idea of fairness too much for that to work here. Take a look at gas tax article comments, where people are pissed-off about EV drivers 'stealing' use of public roads without paying for them (aside from registration fees, tire taxes, sales tax, income tax, etc.). Can you imagine how they'd react to being told "I don't need a catalytic converter - this is a $250,000 limited edition sports car! How about you get your Fiesta smog checked annually instead, you Ford-driving peasant? There are a thousand times as many cars like yours polluting the air!" Fairness aside, pushing the envelope often happens from investments at the boutique level of production, where buyers can afford to outfit their cars with the latest technology, from lightweight components made from composites and alloys to engine components that depend on advanced production techniques and sophisticated electronic control to electric drivetrains. It takes time for some of these premium features to propagate to mainstream automakers, but low-volume automakers are incubators for performance, safety, convenience and even emissions.
          Nick Kordich
          • 5 Months Ago
          @Nick Kordich
          I say Americans believe in fairness and you call that anti-American...?! I think that's the most anti-American thing I've read here so far. Also, did you just say Canada and my 'anti-Americanism' are a perfect fit? Fairness is as much a right-wing virtue as a left-wing one. Your mention of European perspective reminds me of author Anatole France's quote: "In its majestic equality, the law forbids rich and poor alike to sleep under bridges, beg in the streets, and steal loaves of bread." While he's obviously mocking the perspective, as it doesn't fit his idea of justice, it still highlights that the basis of the philosophy that the law applies equally to everyone in spite of economic distress is rooted in *fairness.* It may be a 'Darwinian' fairness, but it's at the root of opposition to government meddling in free markets and taxing earners to support the indolent or promote 'social justice.' I'm not out to build a straw man - please give me a for that conservative virtue, if it's not "fairness." While I think it's unfortunate when people on the left and right take their ideas of fairness to brutal extremes, the concept of fairness is inherently bound to a country birthed in the words "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal..." It's after creation that ideas about fairness fork to the left and right. Getting back to my comment as a reply, I botched my attempt at humor, but my point was to highlight that IBx27's suggestions that a Ferrari should be exempted from certain laws because it's made small numbers is contrary to what many Americans expressed on the gas tax article: they felt that certain people shouldn't get a break just because of the minimal environmental impact. That is, they shouldn't be forgiven the cost of maintaining the roads they use just because they contribute less air pollution. To me, it seemed similar: Ferrari receives a break because of its small total footprint. IBx27's idea sounded like affirmative action to me. Mainstream Fords obey the law and get saddled with smog checks; Ferrari gets special treatment as a minority presence. It just doesn't sound...fair. It seems a violation of the spirit of the free market to have the government impose heavier restrictions on large automakers and make it easier for boutique automakers. When the government helps Tesla this way, it sure is. Finally, let me apologize for my reply making you get all political. It was rude of me to steer this in that direction (and continue it with this reply, but I felt I needed to clarify what I meant by fairness). Hopefully replying felt cathartic. And hopefully you'll contemplate how I can write "Americans like fairness" but you read it as "Americans like socialism." That's some freaky, Manchurian Candidate stuff you got going on. You must have been exposed to social or regular media at some point....
          sixsix
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Nick Kordich
          Your 2nd paragraph is right on. Your first however is way off. This anti-americanism here humors me, especially consider what you describe is perfectly fitting of Europe and Canada. The "idea of fairness" is core to socialism, not capitalism. Despite all the efforts of social media and regular media pushing socialist crap down our throats from every angle, America still is a capitalist country (THANKFULLY!!!). Here there are no guarantees. There is only an opportunity. Not all opportunities are the same however. This is where the fruitloops say it's unfair. However unlike in other countries, anybody, and I mean anybody can strike it rich. Immigrants, poor people, oppressed people. Anyone can make it if they are born with the right abilities and they find the correct opportunities. That's the beauty of it and that's life. If we are all legislated to be the same the we are just living to die. The struggle and fight that makes life is lost and life becomes meaningless. Sorry for getting political but this bullshit about America on here really gets old.
      shyu0622
      • 6 Months Ago
      CO2. Not C zero 2...
      edward.stallings
      • 6 Months Ago
      Less carbon emissions with the same horsepower means better fuel economy. That means less fuel to be carried/lighter weight and better performance. The idea that it is important to reduce CO2 emissions for any other reason is a stupid one because we are at less than .04 % CO2 now. At .02% plants will no longer grow and we could not survive.
        Nick Kordich
        • 6 Months Ago
        @edward.stallings
        It certainly puts things in perspective, doesn't it? Just a -0.008% change from pre-industrial levels (0.028%) would mean 95% of plant biomass (plants dependent on C3 photosynthesis) would be carbon-starved, ending our civilization. It sure makes you wonder what effects a 50% greater change CO2 levels (+0.012%) in the other direction would have.
      korblalak
      • 6 Months Ago
      20% in 7 years! is that a joke?
        edward.stallings
        • 6 Months Ago
        @korblalak
        I'm sure you could maintain performance and decrease emissions by 100% in 5 years. They need to hire you!
          Aaron
          • 6 Months Ago
          @edward.stallings
          Tesla has a very high performance car with zero emissions. Ferrari has stated on the record they won't build an EV. Why couldn't Ferrari use Tesla technology and Ferrari manufacturing know-how to make an electric super car?
          Grendal
          • 6 Months Ago
          @edward.stallings
          They can't because the know how they have is in the ICE. They'd have to hire a bunch of cutting edge electrical engineers to even understand what Tesla has done.
      ffelix422
      • 5 Months Ago
      But will it make the cars look better?
      skoobey
      • 5 Months Ago
      Phew! I didn't buy one because I was so worried about the environment. lol Noone that has ever owned, drove, touched or even seen a picture of a Ferrari couldn't care less about the emissions.
      ddiazoon
      • 5 Months Ago
      Why not make them faster and more efficient at the same time by dropping the worthless gas engine completely.
    • Load More Comments