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Since taking over Bentley, the Volkswagen Group has done a lot to modernize the marque and its products. And no small part of that came down to the engines. Under VW stewardship, Bentley introduced its ubiquitous W12 that makes it the largest producer of twelve-cylinder engines in the world. It then rolled out a smaller V8 co-developed with Audi that offers nearly all the benefits of the larger twelve but with less weight and better fuel economy. There's even been talk of hybrids and diesels. But one thing the Germans have avoided touching is the 6.75-liter V8 in the Mulsanne.

Based on architecture that dates back to 1959, the Bentley L Series engine is one of the oldest automobile engines still in production. But while the basic architecture may remain the same, the engine has, of course, gone through many updates over the past several decades. Introduced when Bentley was still under Rolls-Royce ownership, official output figures were not released, but suffice it to say you can rest assured that it has increased dramatically from the "perfectly adequate" ratings of the original to the effortless 505 horsepower and 752 pound-feet of torque it produces in the Mulsanne today.

And for the foreseeable future, according to Autovisie, the car section of Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf. Which may seem like a foregone conclusion, but does not represent the wisdom of a couple years ago. Speaking with an unnamed spokesperson for Bentley, Autovisie reports that the Flying B marque has no intention of retiring the big old V8 that's still demanded by Mulsanne customers who are not interested in a newer or more technologically advanced engine brought in from Germany. The 6.75-liter V8 is a Bentley signature, after all – much as it was for Rolls-Royce before the two split and new parent BMW developed a V12 of the same capacity for the Phantom – and that's not about to change any time soon, emissions legislation be damned.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 13 Comments
      kanonenofen
      • 5 Months Ago
      This article is partly wrong because when VW bought Bentley the 6,75 litre was on it´s way out due to emission requirements. VW invested quite some money to bring back the 6,75 and is continuously investing in keeping this engine up to date. I guess they see the engine as part of the brand heritage.
      SquareFour
      • 5 Months Ago
      Apparently some things are still sacred. Good news!
      kajohns1964
      • 5 Months Ago
      Is it available as a crate engine? I'd love it in my '66 Galaxie.
      Bernard
      • 5 Months Ago
      Pushrod is definitely the way to go for true luxury. Leave the 4L DOHC for the plebeians.
      carguy1701
      • 5 Months Ago
      Of course they aren't, the customer base doesn't care about fuel mileage.
      Winnie Jenkems
      • 5 Months Ago
      They really should retire that goofy Spongebob Squarepants front end.
      anto needo
      • 5 Months Ago
      Take that American 7 litre V8... Or any American V8 for that matter.
      SpikedLemon
      • 5 Months Ago
      Litre. It's printed right there on the engine. Not "liter" but "litre".
        Winnie Jenkems
        • 5 Months Ago
        @SpikedLemon
        "Lee-tree"?
        Bernard
        • 5 Months Ago
        @SpikedLemon
        I'm sorry but the old world got this one wrong. Liter just makes more sense phonetically.
        stevenh
        • 5 Months Ago
        @SpikedLemon
        Actually Litre is the proper / original way to spell as the metric system was devised by the French
      LW
      • 5 Months Ago
      Why is this dinosaur engine using liters as its size, I would think they would refer to it as being 11 and 2/5 pints. And make sure to make the engine block out of lead so it deadens all vibration at the cost of everything else.
      ffelix422
      • 5 Months Ago
      There was a time when Bently refused to share HP & TQ numbers.
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