Just because the penetration of the American automotive market by Chinese brands hasn't quite happened yet doesn't mean that Chinese-built cars are far off. According to a new report, we could very soon see long-wheelbase Volvo S60s that were assembled in the People's Republic arriving on US shores.

The report comes from Automotive News China, which cites an anonymous Volvo exec. An official Volvo spokesperson later corroborated ANC's report, although where the original source claimed that we could see the Chinese-built S60L in US dealers at some point in 2015, the company line was that a timeline hadn't been established to begin exports from the world's most populous nation.

According to Volvo, the benefit to exporting from China to the United States rather than from Sweden is the relationship between the US dollar and the Chinese yuan. Overall, it's a less tumultuous issue than the dollar-to-euro situation. By moving vehicles from China to the US, the Chinese-owned company is limiting the degree of risk it's taking with sudden currency swings.

Volvo is currently looking at other markets for export, as well, which could include moving Chinese-built XC90s to Russia.


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  • 95 Comments
      h-man
      • 6 Months Ago
      China is ground zero for shoddy parts. The aviation industry is swamped with visually identical knock-off parts, even down to the smallest bolts. Most are made in a reputable factory's and then there are the knock-offs from China. Those from China are junk, have not met tolerances and fail under load. It is a very dangerous situation. The Chinese don't care, they will knock-off everything. Producing cars in China for export market is a terrible idea. Unless you have the place locked down like a prison you are basically throwing the companies future away in order to save money today.
        Jerry
        • 6 Months Ago
        @h-man
        The short term profitability boost will make all the bean counters at the top happy in their little two-year return window of life. The folks who made decisions will collect their big bonuses and move on within the next couple years. It will be the people after these $@?!ers who have to pick up the pieces. Greed knows no national boundaries.
        cnautofan
        • 6 Months Ago
        @h-man
        You got what you pay...
      Car Guy
      • 6 Months Ago
      I don't care if it has the Volvo name - if it's from china it's likely to have corners cut in its construction and you couldn't pay me to drive that crap.
      Gregory Calise
      • 6 Months Ago
      This is a huge mistake for Volvo. This will destroy their reputation and sales. I would never buy a chinese car. Their steel is for crap, and unless they have Swedish people on the ground supervising every aspect, you can forget about it. Then consider the slave factories, human rights abuses, etc., it's just a really, really bad move.
      no1bondfan
      • 6 Months Ago
      I hope we slap a huge import tariff on these cars. They do the same with our vehicles.
        cnautofan
        • 6 Months Ago
        @no1bondfan
        You will not say so if you know the huge profits GM/Ford got in China, you are totally ignorant about international trade.
          no1bondfan
          • 6 Months Ago
          @cnautofan
          I'm well aware that they make money in China, but they are required to "partner" with local firms, lose IP in the process, and share in those profits with local partners that don't really bring any benefits to the partnership. They partner with those firms because of onerous import duties that are placed on vehicles produced abroad and shipped into China, and they are not allowed to fully own their businesses within the country. I am merely suggesting reciprocal tariffs. Perhaps you are the ignorant one?
      RetrogradE
      • 6 Months Ago
      I'd rather walk. Everywhere.
        dualface
        • 6 Months Ago
        @RetrogradE
        Tell me your shoes are made in the US and A!
      GCG
      • 6 Months Ago
      Glad I dumped my Belgian made Volvo (XC60) But as someone mentioned before, cars are mostly made by robots, but bigger problem with Chinese made cars is parts they are made with. It's not like Volvo is just assembling their cars with same 100% parts as cars made in Europe. Ask Aston Martin how well their Chinese made part went. With so much garbage coming out of China, hard to tell what's legit and what's not. Bigger problem, Volvo is 'upscale' brand, not quite MB/BMW level, but notch below. It's all about perception. Even if only 1 car is going to be imported from China, it can have negative affect on rest of range. When you have 20+ years of 'made in China is crap' perception, it's going to tank rest of the brand, which will also piss off current owners with reduced resale value on current cars, which means they probably won't go buy another Volvo, and new customers will stay away from $50k 'Made in China' vehicle. Not sure what Volvo's logic is on this one. Essentially killing your own brand, slowly but surely. No one really thinks twice when your GM has Chinese made transmission in it, but when whole 'luxury car' is made in China, you're not going to win the perception battle.
        Silentnoise713
        • 6 Months Ago
        @GCG
        Don't forget Korean and Japanese were "omg, crap, don't/won't buy" only a few decades ago. Perception can change (along with product change/evolution) in a shorter than you'd think period of time. People are gullible. The question that remains to be seen is Volvo's game plan. I like the brand and hope they have future long term visions and goals.
          hypermiler
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Silentnoise713
          But Koreans and Japanese aren't Chinese.
          cnautofan
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Silentnoise713
          Cannot agree more, let the time to speak the truth and change the perception
      tenspeeder
      • 6 Months Ago
      Will they be sold through Walmart?
      shiratori90
      • 6 Months Ago
      "According to Volvo, the benefit to exporting from China to the United States rather than from Sweden is the relationship between the US dollar and the Chinese yuan. Overall, it's a less tumultuous issue than the dollar-to-euro situation. By moving vehicles from China to the US, the Chinese-owned company is limiting the degree of risk it's taking with sudden currency swings." OR, they could just build them in the US and avoid currency swings all together. Of course, that would require a lower amount of greed on the part of volvo and geely execs........
      StephenT
      • 6 Months Ago
      There should be a way to tell where it was built by the first letter of the VIN number. I would certainly avoid cars starting with the Chinese letter (or number) if I were shopping for a Volvo.
        GCG
        • 6 Months Ago
        @StephenT
        If VIN Starts with L it's Chinese made.
      ksrcm
      • 6 Months Ago
      The ONLY reason I would get Volvo over their competition are the perks you get with European Delivery. They have a really, really good program (at least they used to two years ago when my wife was shopping and C30 was a consideration) and the best part of it was you can build your car as Europeans can : more colors available, more interior combos available, options were on a cherry-picking list and not bundles and you get two free tickets to Stockholm. No way I would ever buy a Volvo without that possibility. Like BMW, you will not be getting a European Delivery on vehicles built outside of Germany (like all X models built in SC). Not good, Volvo.
      tigersharkjr
      • 6 Months Ago
      DO NOT BUY. I dont care if its GM, Ford or Chrysler. If we lose our car based manufacturing to those bastards it wont be good.
        Hung Ng
        • 6 Months Ago
        @tigersharkjr
        The truth is not as simple as it seems. Any person with moral will first look himself/herself in the mirror and question whether oneself's consumer oriented culture is the cause of the problem. Most Chinese made goods are made under the US brand labels, i.e. they are made for US companies. So immediately you can see the truth is getting more complicated. US companies' main objective is profit so low cost is of paramount importance. Also US companies have to respond to consumer pressure so low cost is again of paramount importance. There is no need to explain further: the fault does not solely belong to Chinese made products. Most US consumers are just not educated enough to even know what are really going on behind the scene. To understand the truth, one needs to understand more different topics: economics, political science, media communication.
          Patriot
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Hung Ng
          Not to mention the fact that China is unable to design and engineer products any sane person would want without stealing it first. Has to make Chinese citizens proud.
          Patriot
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Hung Ng
          Once the true costs are included in what China produces you will no longer be considered for new trinket production. Companies are already looking other places and some are actually bringing the work back home where it should have never been moved from.
        nettsu
        • 6 Months Ago
        @tigersharkjr
        And how much of an American car is American?
      marv.shocker
      • 6 Months Ago
      N-O-P-E
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