Count wireless vehicle charging system sales as yet another sector in which both supply and demand will soon surge because of the growing popularity of plug-in vehicles. The relatively nascent inductive charging market will more than double every year from 2012 to 2020, research firm Frost & Sullivan says. With inductive charging, a driver can simply park the vehicle over a sensor in the ground or on a garage floor and have the vehicle recharge without the aid of power cords.

More than 10 automakers have begun testing wireless charging systems, including Renault, Nissan, Daimler, Volvo, BMW and Toyota. Many of those companies plan to include wireless charging systems as a built-in feature. For example, reports were out in April that Volkswagen may have its own inductive charging system ready for the public by 2017.

With such rapid growth, annual wireless charging unit sales will reach about 352,000 by the end of the decade. Wireless systems will will account for about one in 80 charging systems in North America and one out of about 40 in Europe by 2020. About 70 percent of those systems will be for residential use. You can read more in Frost & Sullivan's press release below.
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Frost & Sullivan: Inductive Charging for Electric Vehicles to Gain Traction Transforming Infrastructure Landscape

Strategic alliances and partnerships are key to gain expertise and opportunities for research and development

LONDON, June 5, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Intensive research has boosted the profile of the nascent electric vehicles (EVs) inductive charging market globally. As various verticals such as telecom, industrial automation, and utilities establish their presence in this domain, market participants will increasingly partner with original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) at the testing phase to enhance the value of their products.

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan, Strategic Analysis of Inductive Charging for Global Electric Vehicles (EV) Market, finds that the total market for inductive charging is expected to experience a compound annual growth rate of 126.6 percent from 2012 to 2020, with approximately 351,900 units likely to be sold. Inductive charging will account for 1.2 percent of both public and residential charging in North America and more than 2.6 percent in Europe. Residential charging will be the most popular method, accounting for more than 70 percent of the overall charging.

The market for inductive charging will grow the fastest in Europe, owing to a number of demonstration projects conducted by government bodies, OEMs, and charging station manufacturers.

"OEMs such as Renault, Nissan, Daimler, Volvo, BMW and Toyota are working on the development of inductive charging for future EVs, and more than 10 automakers have announced trial tests," said Frost & Sullivan Automotive and Transportation Senior Research Analyst Prajyot Sathe. "As a result, inductive charging will soon be available in cars either as an additional feature or as an inbuilt feature."

Currently, inductive charging is offered as an aftermarket solution with attractive financing options. Yet, the cost of purchasing and installing an inductive charging solution is approximately 30 percent higher than that of conductive charging. The time taken to charge is also longer, reducing the feasibility of what would otherwise be the most convenient way of charging EVs.

To overcome these challenges, market participants from across the value chain are partnering with OEMs to gain further opportunities for research and development. Large companies are acquiring smaller companies to strengthen their product portfolio.

"While in the short-term 3.3 kilowatts inductive charging will be widely accepted to enable residential and semi-public charging, with time, vehicles will tilt towards 6.6 kW to enable faster charging," noted Sathe. "Inductive charging in stationary applications too will be most sought after in the near-term, whereas dynamic or on-the-move charging will gain traction post-2020."

If you are interested in more information on this study, please send an e-mail to Chiara Carella, Corporate Communications, at chiara.carella@frost.com, with your full name, company name, job title, telephone number, company e-mail address, company website, city, state and country.

Strategic Analysis of Inductive Charging for Global Electric Vehicles (EV) Market is part of the Automotive & Transportation (http://www.automotive.frost.com) Growth Partnership Service program. Frost & Sullivan's related studies include: Strategic Outlook of Global Electric Vehicle Market in 2014, Outlook of the Global Automotive Industry, Global Investment Opportunities in Electric Vehicles (EVs), and Global Hybrid and Electric Heavy-Duty Transit Bus Market. All studies included in subscriptions provide detailed market opportunities and industry trends evaluated following extensive interviews with market participants.

About Frost & Sullivan

Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today's market participants.

Our "Growth Partnership" supports clients by addressing these opportunities and incorporating two key elements driving visionary innovation: The Integrated Value Proposition and The Partnership Infrastructure.

The Integrated Value Proposition provides support to our clients throughout all phases of their journey to visionary innovation including: research, analysis, strategy, vision, innovation and implementation.
The Partnership Infrastructure is entirely unique as it constructs the foundation upon which visionary innovation becomes possible. This includes our 360 degree research, comprehensive industry coverage, career best practices as well as our global footprint of more than 40 offices.
For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Is your organisation prepared for the next profound wave of industry convergence, disruptive technologies, increasing competitive intensity, Mega Trends, breakthrough best practices, changing customer dynamics and emerging economies?


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 32 Comments
      EVSUPERHERO
      • 6 Months Ago
      I need this wire less charging for my cell phone. Why is it such a hassle to plug in your car and yet plugging in a cell phone is easy enough so they don't have induction charging for it after all these years?. Yes, yes, I know you have to walk all the way out to the garage to plug in the car.
        • 6 Months Ago
        @EVSUPERHERO
        Tons of Windows phones and Androids have inductive charging.
        brotherkenny4
        • 6 Months Ago
        @EVSUPERHERO
        I think it is because it's hard to remember to plug in your car. You know, with all those texts and twitters that we all have to do these days, things like plugging in your car are very easily forgotten. With wireless charging if you can remember to park your car in the garage you don't need to worry. Actually, it will be like an automatic transmission, where you don't really need it nor is it actually that much better in reality, but it will be sold as a luxury bump up on the cars and will get you into a higher trimline. Just like car companies have always done with people who are susceptible to the simplistic psychological manipulations that salesmen apply to the gullible masses. But hey, in the end, after you've paid more than you should have, you will convince yourselves that you are simply being nice to yourself by not having to do the laborious task of plugging in your car.
          Actionable Mango
          • 6 Months Ago
          @brotherkenny4
          "Actually, it will be like an automatic transmission, where you don't really need it nor is it actually that much better in reality" I'm a huge fan of manuals, but the reality is that manuals suck in stop-and-go traffic. If I lived away from the city, I'd have a manual, but I live in one of the top 5 congested cities in the US.
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 6 Months Ago
        @EVSUPERHERO
        One other reason would be, when your cell phone dies you can plug it in and still use it. When your car dies you can't plug it in and still use it.
        Letstakeawalk
        • 6 Months Ago
        @EVSUPERHERO
        Induction charging for cell phones does exist, and has for years.
      scraejtp
      • 6 Months Ago
      More proprietary hardware, rejoice. At least the plug-in units have a standard to follow, but currently it seems doubtful that a useful standard will develop that automakers will adhere to. I did briefly think about buying an induction unit for my Volt, but couldn't justify the cost. A high current capable EVSE is already a very high cost.
        Actionable Mango
        • 6 Months Ago
        @scraejtp
        "At least the plug-in units have a standard to follow" "A" standard to follow? Hahahaha. J1772 Combo. Supercharger. CHAdeMO. GB/T. Mennekes Combo 2.
          scraejtp
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Actionable Mango
          Yeah, the DC fast charging is a nightmare. Level 2 charging, which is the maximum you can expect from induction, is pretty standardized with the J1772 plug.
      Carguy
      • 6 Months Ago
      We have been a two EV family for over 50,000 miles just over two years and what would make this more convenient is not having a cord. Currently if one of our EV's is plugged in and the second EV driver wants to pull in to the garage we have to unplug the first one and then re plug in the EV. If you could push the charging puck from under one car to the other that would currently be worth about a $200-$400 premium to me.
        Joeviocoe
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Carguy
        They do make dual EVSE Chargers with two plugs. "Pushing the puck" would require a cable left on the ground. If you are okay with a possible tripping hazard, then that could work great. Thank you for writing exactly your "value factor" that you would place on this. Currently, this system's cost is over 10x what you (and most people) are willing to pay. When the costs come down, wireless charging will be a great option.
      Levine Levine
      • 6 Months Ago
      Don't count your chickens yet. Installing a pedestal mounted fast DC charger is still cheaper and faster than having to dig out the pavement to install the inductive loop and wiring to the power source. Plus, two EV can share one plug-in charger whereas inductive charging one car monopolizes the inductive loop.
        Spec
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Levine Levine
        Well, these are just for residential usage and they just plop the unit on the ground as illustrated . . . but it will have conduit/wire attached to it (which they omit from the picture to make it look better).
      Marco Polo
      • 6 Months Ago
      @ Joeviocoe Don't be so gloomy ! If an auto-maker loses on offering inductive charging, well that's the way business learns. It's a risk. However, if offering inductive charging works, the auto-maker gains an edge, even if just by offering the option, the manufacturer gains a little prestige and customer confidence.
      Joeviocoe
      • 6 Months Ago
      Sure.. an automaker could offer and lose. I am just giving a reasonable explanation as to why we won't see automakers offering. Just so we know in the future... that it wasn't technology that hadn't been invented... that the economics didn't work out. 9 times out of 10.. good ideas don't see sunlight NOT because of technology.. but because of economics.
      Joeviocoe
      • 6 Months Ago
      Maybe I wasn't clear about "cost effective". Even convenience has a "value factor"... that is worth something to somebody. I understand that some people value the few seconds of not having to plug in greater than others. That is not the issue. The issue is HOW MANY, and HOW MUCH are willing to spend on that convenience. The answer is not a whole lot. So few, that an automaker would lose more money just trying to make it an option.
      DarylMc
      • 6 Months Ago
      1 in 80 and 1 in 40 seem reasonable and modest projections.
      Marco Polo
      • 6 Months Ago
      @ Joeviocoe "9 times out of 10.. good ideas don't see sunlight NOT because of technology.. but because of economics " . ......that's very true, but then no one ever went broke selling convenience...:)
      paulwesterberg
      • 6 Months Ago
      At this point any increase in wireless vehicle charging would be an infinite increase percentage. The drawbacks of wireless charging is that it wastes approx 10% of the energy transmitted and is limited to level 2 power levels. A system using automated connectors could provide the same "wireless" experience without those drawbacks.
      Marco Polo
      • 6 Months Ago
      @ Joeviocoe As always, you are entitled to your opinion, and if you don't want inductive charging you don't have to have it. However, others, especially female and the elderly, may wish to spend a few extra dollars for the convenience. That's their right ! Convenience, doesn't need to be " cost effective" , like power widows, etc it's just convenient !
      Ricardo Gozinya
      • 6 Months Ago
      Inductive charging really isn't a big priority for anybody who's doing serious development in EVs. It adds a lot of cost and weight to an already expensive and overweight platform. For essentially zero benefit, unless someone really is just too lazy to be bothered with putting a plug into a socket. Increasing range, decreasing cost and weight, maybe developing a single standard for charging. These things take precedence over something that has about as much utility as a remote control toilet.
        Spec
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Ricardo Gozinya
        Yeah, it is just offered because: 1) It is pretty easy to do; and 2) It does have some whiz-bang appeal to it. But I really think it is low priority. It should be offered as an option for anyone that wants it but it doesn't really help EVs reach mainstream acceptance. (Except maybe it will reduce the all divorces caused by EVs as Fox "News" suggested might happen. LOL. ;-) )
        Actionable Mango
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Ricardo Gozinya
        The history of successful inventions is full of things that cost money and deliver nothing other than convenience. "Zero benefit" is a matter of opinion. Some day there will be tens of millions of EV drivers and it is conceivable that some of them will forget to plug in. Maybe they had a stressful day, maybe they were in a hurry, maybe they had too many things on their mind. And the next morning they will wake up only to discover they won't be able make it in to work. On that day, wireless charging will sound like the best idea ever.
          Joeviocoe
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Actionable Mango
          The benefits of convenience have to outweigh the disadvantages. Saving a few seconds is nice... but the disadvantages are outweighing that little benefit.
          Joeviocoe
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Actionable Mango
          Maybe (when their tens of millions of EV drivers) there will be a cheaper alternative to wireless... something that won't even result in energy loss. Like a robotic pedestal that will communicate with the EV to open the port, flash IR LEDS to guide a mechanical arm with the charge connector into the port. It won't require an expensive device in the floors of the EV and parking space, and be fully compatible with any EV. And won't result in energy loss.
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Actionable Mango
          Joe, I don't think saving a few seconds is the keystone here. Rather the ability to not have to think at all. We Americans are getting addicted to not have to think. Maybe we just love things that are automatic and save us from being mistake prone. I suppose it would be nice to not have to remember to plug your car or your phone in. In the cars case you just "set it and forget it", ala Ron Popeel. Set it in it's parking spot and done. You never give it a second thought. Of course your kid could leave his bicycle in the way and there you are, having to think again. Yes, a automatic robot arm that deployed would do the same thing and less energy loss. Spec, good point, I forgot about all the marriages this would save, now I know why Marco wants it.
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