• Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
  • Image Credit: Nissan
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  • Image Credit: Nissan
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  • Image Credit: Nissan
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Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn may not be intimately familiar with the Dean Martin 1962 classic South of the Border, but he may as well start crooning the standard now. The Japanese automaker said this week that the Nissan Leaf will officially be the first mass-produced battery-electric vehicle to be sold in Mexico. So break out the horn section.

Nissan will start selling the Leaf through its Mexico City dealership network and is touting features such as the car's fast-charging port. That feature allows the car to be 80-percent charged in about a half hour. Nissan and the Mexican government are also working on an "electric corridor" of charging stations between Mexico City and Cuernavaca, which is about 55 miles to the south. There will also be "charging zones" in various districts throughout Mexico City, making it easier for the newly inaugurated EV drivers to charge up in town.

Nissan has been working on Leaf brand exposure to Mexico City for years, sending the first batch of 100 all-electric Leaf taxis to Mexico starting in the fall of 2011. Last month, Nissan had its best ever month of sales in the US, moving 3,117 Leafs in May and the company has sold over 115,000 Leafs around the world. Check out Nissan's press release below.
Show full PR text
Nissan becomes the first company to sell a 100% electric vehicle in Mexico

Nissan LEAF arrives in Mexico and becomes the first 100 percent electric vehicle to be comprehensively marketed in the country.
The car of the future is already part of the present with more than 115,000 global sales.
Nissan, the leader company in electric vehicles, strengthens its commitment to promote Zero-Emission mobility by opening charge centers distributed in Mexico.
MEXICO CITY – Nissan today announced the launch of LEAF, the first 100 percent electric vehicle to be marketed in Mexico. The presale starts today and will continue until its arrival on June 30.

Nissan LEAF is the first zero-emissions vehicle marketed in Mexico, confirming the leadership and the promise of the Japanese company to transform traditional driving into a new silent experience.

"Nissan LEAF is a reality in the Mexican market," said Airton Cousseau, CEO of Nissan Mexicana. "We are proud to be the pioneer company to introduce the first zero-emissions vehicle leader in sales worldwide in Mexico. This release represents an honor for us and recognizes a milestone in the history of innovation in Nissan, a cornerstone of our business strategy."

In Mexico, the Nissan LEAF will be available in a unique version with Around View Monitor that allows a panoramic view around the car, "B Mode driving" that allows power renewal almost immediately after the throttle is removed, a fast-charging port that allows a recharge of 80 percent of the battery in just 30 minutes, leather seats, a 7-inch touch screen, and many other features.

"Many of the 115,000 LEAF users have expressed the thrill of driving an electric vehicle," said Alejandro Viveros, senior manager of the zero-emissions business unit. "Having a Nissan LEAF is a totally fun and satisfying experience that now Mexican customers can enjoy."

Initially, the Nissan LEAF in Mexico will be available for sale through Nissan's certified dealership network located in Mexico City.

In addition, Nissan and the Government of the State of Morelos have taken the initiative to create the first electric corridor in Latin America that will be located between Mexico City and Cuernavaca.

Mexico City soon will have a development plan to install charging zones in Colonia Roma, Colonia Del Valle, Coyoacan, Polanco, Santa Fe, Ciudad Satelite, Altavista and San Angel.

"The main goal of this infrastructure is to increase the offer of charging stations to increase the confidence and safety when driving an electric vehicle, with the benefit of a responsible social change," said Jorge Vallejo, director of external relations and government affairs for Nissan in Mexico, Latin America and the Caribbean. "We understand the anxiety that driving an electric vehicle can cause without the proper infrastructure in each city, and the most important and positive fact is that every Nissan LEAF user has the chance to charge the vehicle at home."

Nissan presented the results of a study led by INAINE (Institute for Ecological Research Assistance, AC) in relation to the development of EV infrastructure in Mexico City. The study was possible thanks to a fund that METI (a Japanese government entity) awarded Nissan, and it confirmed the viability of infrastructure development for the marketing of EVs in Mexico City.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 22 Comments
      • 1 Year Ago
      I am from mexico and the stupid guys at Nissan decide to sell this vehicle starting from 545,000 pesos. That's almost 42,000 usd. That's double the price from the US. They are selling this 2011 model as 2015 here, which by the way, Nissan doesn't releases 2015 model in the US. This car is made in the US which doesn't pay any extra taxes and duties. I don't know who decided this, but once again, green cars in mexico will be a luxury that few people will afford. Looks like we will be attached to fossil fuel for a while. Mexican government not interested. Sad but true guys.
        aatheus
        • 1 Year Ago
        Is this the fully-loaded model, or the more basic model? The fully loaded 2011 SL model was $37,000 before federal and state incentives. So pretty close to the Mexican price. Still, it sucks that the Mexican price is higher.
      Ziv
      • 1 Year Ago
      Mexico is a great place for solar arrays and electric cars. Got to wonder if the Leaf pack is up for the very high heat of inland Mexico. When does the new heat resistant battery chemistry come out? Is it this year?
      EVSUPERHERO
      • 1 Year Ago
      Holy guacamole Batman! How much is gasoline in Mexico?
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 1 Year Ago
        @EVSUPERHERO
        A quick search indicated gas is about 20 cents cheaper than the US. The government subsidizes it.
      kebhariads
      • 1 Year Ago
      This procedure should be applicable in foreign country,not for market in India .because here street and traffic problem.Thank for sharing.
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      Not to be too cynical . . . but at least you probably don't have to worry too much about someone stealing your Leaf. They won't know what to do with it.
        Wika Rocha
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Spec
        and you guys wonder why the hell all the world think people in the US are ******** ...
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Wika Rocha
          Yeah, as a Californian, I love the local Latin culture. But sadly the drug wars down in Mexico have created a bit of a terrible situation down in Mexico that has led to far too much crime. I think having a limited-range electric vehicle will actually have a bit of upside . . . thieves will not likely have charging equipment and there will not be much of a market for parts.
          Marco Polo
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Wika Rocha
          @ Wika Rocha, I don't believe Sec is being racist, or intentionally Xenophobic, it's just that Mexico City does have an immense problem with crime involving auto-mobiles. (well, crime period).
      sebringc5
      • 1 Year Ago
      Would'nt that be great if not only being accredited in saving the environment....the Leaf is responsible for stabilizing the Mexican electrical infrastructure with vehicle to grid technology! All the best, Aaron Lephart www.smartcar451.com
      Marco Polo
      • 1 Year Ago
      It's good to see Carlos Ghosn continuing to push, and improve, the Leaf. Since the little cars inception it's battled hard to win a viable place, even within a niche market. For all it's faults and limitations, The Nissan has proved to be a resilient little EV that has captured the heart of at least 100,000 owners. The Leaf has proved that EV's are 'potentially' viable alternatives to gasoline and diesel passenger vehicles. Like all pioneers, the Leaf has only a minuscule impact on the world auto-market, and even less on the environment. But that's not the point ! What Ghosn has established, is that EV technology has the potential to replace ICE passenger vehicles, with further advances in ESD technology.
      Wika Rocha
      • 1 Year Ago
      forgot to say, i got this info from the official nissan mexico webpage http://nissan.com.mx/autos/leaf
      Technoir
      • 1 Year Ago
      Will be used to tansfer drugs in no time.
        Wika Rocha
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Technoir
        wouldn't that be good for you guys ? if we make drugs and export them to the US is because you are consuming them, and paying way more than someone will normally pay for drugs
          Thereminator
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Wika Rocha
          Its convenient to "separate" the poor,ignorant citizens from the "evil" government...however I cant do that. Its the citizens that allow gun laws that ban themselves from protecting there own rights and lives...and from having anything that looks like a free market/representative democracy. Own your country and its problems.
          Thereminator
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Wika Rocha
          Yeah...blame those evil drug users(or anyone other than Mexicans).Mexico's real problem is with "its not ME!" syndrome,giving way to severely corrupt government officials/Oligarchy and ONLY the citizens of Mexico can be responsible for allowing that to happen. The bell tolls for you.
          Spec
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Wika Rocha
          Indeed . . . the USA shares some blame for the drug wars. And sadly, we are also the source of most of the guns purchased by the cartels down there. There is plenty of blame to go around but we all need to do what we can to remedy the situation.
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Technoir
        No one will find them in the frunk.
      Wika Rocha
      • 1 Year Ago
      The thing that is more important to point out about this is the fact that nissan will only lease the cars, and the lease deal is ridiculous, we are talking about a lease deal of 13492 mexican peso (1044 US dollars) a month, for 48 months, you know you could buy a tesla with that kind of money In a country where people earn a lot less than in the US...
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Wika Rocha
        Why do they charge Mexico so much money for the Leaf? Are other cars expensive in Mexico?
          Wika Rocha
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EVSUPERHERO
          they are generally a little more expensive, but not this much, and it also depends where the car is made, i think Japanese cars have a 40% import tax, but then again the leaf is made in the US now, so no reason to make it super expensive here, unless they don't want to sell any
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