Ram may be preparing a new sort of tailgate that could rethink the way we access the bed of the company's pickup trucks. Rather than the typical fold-down tailgate that we know so well, patent drawings show a tailgate that combines the functionality of a traditional fold-down design with a 50/50 split that can, individually, be opened like a barn-door design or dropped flat like a standard tailgate.

Now, Ram is far from the first to toy around with something like this. The most obvious example is the Honda Ridgeline, which features a single-piece tailgate that is double-hinged so that it can open traditionally or be swung out to the side. The big news here is the split and the fact that each half can be used independently of the other. Unlike the Honda, the individual halves would be operated via touchpads.

The implications of this new design aren't entirely clear right now. It seems possible that the rendering could just be for a concept vehicle, but production is certainly possible as well – Ram has shown a real willingness to innovate in the pickup segment as of late, with features like coil-spring rear suspensions, light-duty diesels and the Ram Box bedside storage system.


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  • 40 Comments
      Riley C.
      • 6 Months Ago
      "Radical" is not the word for it... "New" should be.
      Jeremy
      • 6 Months Ago
      I would love to have a split tailgate. If I'm hauling something longer than the bed, I can open only one half to let it hang off, on that one side. Also, you could swing one side open, and use the bumper to step into the bed, instead of laying the tailgate down and having to use one foot and only a corner of the bumper to get in. Another good use, would be if you're hauling dirt or mulch, you could open one side to better distribute the dirt/mulch to where you want it.
      tenspeeder
      • 6 Months Ago
      Touchpads? Give me one that I can just operate via handles in the gate instead
      Revis Goodworth
      • 6 Months Ago
      Once again Honduhblog cannot go without blatantly pandering to its Honduh sellout and offer a comparison to the pathetic excuse of a truck,the Ridgeline, which is really the first vehicle with a hidden catbox carrier on wheels. Ford pioneered the very tailgate that Honduhblog attributes to the Ridegline - Ford station wagons were the first to patent and to build a rear access tailgate that would both fold down and also swing open. Honduh merely was the first to add to a car that looks like a truck. But the Ridgeline is never a truck - and if you stretch the definition to a truck, then so is a Tonka.
        bombdefuzerjeff
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Revis Goodworth
        You're right! Every car that has wheels is a rip off of a Ford idea! Give us all a break. Why would there be a patent if it was something that someone else invented?
          jz78817
          • 6 Months Ago
          @bombdefuzerjeff
          no, he's right. Ford introduced the "Magic Doorgate" on their 1966 wagons, a tailgate which could either flip down or swing outward. The Honda Ridgeline's tailgate could do the same thing, and since it seems Brandon Turkus thinks anything which happened before he was born is unimportant then Honda must have invented the thing. Even though Ford invented it 40 years earlier.
      lostboyz
      • 6 Months Ago
      Coil springs went in back in 2010 and nobody else has even tried. Now they have air suspension with active load leveling. It has a ton of features that are well beyond the competition, and that's why sales have doubled since 2010. 8 speed trans, electronic shifter, fob-locking tailgate and ram boxes, front park assist....
      BipDBo
      • 6 Months Ago
      I cannot think of a single purpose for this.
        sc0rch3d
        • 6 Months Ago
        @BipDBo
        sometimes answering a question that nobody asks, does actually reveal the question we never thought we needed an answer to
      ebn.hahn
      • 6 Months Ago
      WhoptiDoo.... Lincoln Blackwood had it. What is the value added when you can lower the entire tailgate...
      jebibudala
      • 6 Months Ago
      I thought Ford already had this.
        jz78817
        • 6 Months Ago
        @jebibudala
        they did, in the 1960s. But modern "automotive journalists" are kids who think nothing important happened before they were born. So, Honda "invented" the dual-opening tailgate 40 years after Ford did. I read a post elsewhere from some dude who said "diesels have been direct injection since the '90s when VW launched the TDI." I didn't hear anything back from him when I kindly stated that diesels have been direct injection since the 1920s.
          atc98092
          • 6 Months Ago
          @jz78817
          Perhaps there were some direct injection diesels back then, but until the 90s the vast majority of diesel automobiles had indirect injection. The fuel was not injected directly into the cylinder, but instead into a small chamber that had a path for the burning gasses to pass into the cylinder. My 1980 Rabbit diesel had such an indirect injected engine, as did all those old Mercedes engines.
          jz78817
          • 6 Months Ago
          @jz78817
          almost all diesel engines were direct injection since like the 1920s. *car* diesels tried pre-chambers as a way to quiet the engines down for a little while until common-rail injection became viable. Indirect injection was a fad. As I said, VW didn't invent direct injection.
      360_AD
      • 6 Months Ago
      Seems like a solution to a nonexistent problem?
      Dark Gnat
      • 6 Months Ago
      There is nothing new or inventive about this at all.
      CGJHfootballdude
      • 6 Months Ago
      Chrysler has some good engineers. You can Like them or Love them but in the end you have to at least give them credit for the innovations that the new Chrysler, Ram and Jeep are bringing to the table.
      Bradford
      • 6 Months Ago
      Lincoln Blackwood did this, right?
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