The Nissan GT-R LM Nismo for the 24 Hours of Le Mans is teased with other GT-R racing variants.

For those wondering why Nissan named its coming Le Mans Prototype the GT-R LM Nismo, colliding the two worlds of sports car and prototype racing, an article in Autocar might have the answer. The deeper union is explained by saying that the next-generation GT-R will use "hybrid technology that will closely align it" with the GT-R LM Nismo.

The point could be further driven home by the fact that the GT-R LM Nismo will begin its FIA endurance racing campaign next year, and the next GT-R is due to debut next year as a 2016 model. The expectation is that it will use a hybrid system possibly dubbed R-Hybrid and perhaps developed by Williams. Just like performance car makers Ferrari and Audi, Nissan wants its racing efforts to pay off with road car technology, company vice president Andy Palmer saying they "want to link technological linkages between future evolutions of the GT-R and evolutions of what we do in LMP1, and the two do go in both directions."

The bigger question is, with the GT-R getting hybrid assistance, will it also get the weight gain that usually comes with it? Enthusiasts would love to see the trend reversed, especially on a car that's already no lightweight.