For those wondering why Nissan named its coming Le Mans Prototype the GT-R LM Nismo, colliding the two worlds of sports car and prototype racing, an article in Autocar might have the answer. The deeper union is explained by saying that the next-generation GT-R will use "hybrid technology that will closely align it" with the GT-R LM Nismo.

The point could be further driven home by the fact that the GT-R LM Nismo will begin its FIA endurance racing campaign next year, and the next GT-R is due to debut next year as a 2016 model. The expectation is that it will use a hybrid system possibly dubbed R-Hybrid and perhaps developed by Williams. Just like performance car makers Ferrari and Audi, Nissan wants its racing efforts to pay off with road car technology, company vice president Andy Palmer saying they "want to link technological linkages between future evolutions of the GT-R and evolutions of what we do in LMP1, and the two do go in both directions."

The bigger question is, with the GT-R getting hybrid assistance, will it also get the weight gain that usually comes with it? Enthusiasts would love to see the trend reversed, especially on a car that's already no lightweight.


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  • 14 Comments
      KeiCarLvr
      • 6 Months Ago
      No, the real question is, "why give a damn?" Seriously. New tech, probably better performance figures, and you're going to complain about weight? Really? Not that big a deal. The tech will mature over time and innovations like Ford's newest Fusion concept will put that concern to rest. Lighten up and enjoy the future.
        Aaron N
        • 6 Months Ago
        @KeiCarLvr
        Well here's the thing that goes along with what you're saying... The GT-R might be 3900lbs. But um, it does 0-60 in 2.7s and does the Nurburgring in under 7:20. Don't get me wrong, it would be nice to have a lightweight GT-R, but the car is absolutely amazing in both technology and performance.
          forg0tmypen
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Aaron N
          Let me ask you this: why innovate on the driveline and electronics of the car, yet totally neglect the weight? Can you imagine a 3,499lb GTR with all the new tech they have planned? It would be world beating for a decade. In any case hopefully we see some carbon ceramic brakes this time.
      fordskydog
      • 6 Months Ago
      Don't let your fat girlfriend... I mean just don't buy it in white.
      Richard Fitzwell
      • 6 Months Ago
      To drive an European car or domestics, you need to know how to drive them to get the most out of them. To drive a Japanese cars, they take the skill out of it. GTR is case and point, every aspect is assisted with computers. Every ricer is techno fitted to make a idiot look like a pro. In Japan they also sell sex assist contraptions too, to allow out of shape dudes to perform. That's like your beloved GTR, lets admit, you can't drive well so the GTR will fill in the hole. We have programs for folks like that. It's called a short bus, did you take one? Sound familiar ricers fanboys?
        chrisphenephom@yahoo.com
        @Richard Fitzwell
        lol stopped reading after you called the GTR a ricer. Your just mad the GTR can do what those cars can do without breaking a sweat. hater
          forg0tmypen
          • 6 Months Ago
          @chrisphenephom@yahoo.com
          It is rice. GTR is every ricers wet dream. It's just not a car I would drive. I can say this, unlike 99% of people that comment here, I own a super car and can afford a GTR.
      mitytitywhitey
      • 6 Months Ago
      I would imagine that means it's going to stay a very 'aggressive' looking car rather than become a pretty one. I would not call LeMans prototypes pretty, nor would I the GTR. But I would call them awesome.
      360_AD
      • 6 Months Ago
      "The bigger question is, with the GT-R getting hybrid assistance, will it also get the weight gain that usually comes with it? Enthusiasts would love to see the trend reversed, especially on a car that's already no lightweight." Not true. As long as there is significant power and traction to offset the weight, the heft will be largely overlooked. Current GT-R is case in point.
        forg0tmypen
        • 6 Months Ago
        @360_AD
        Sounds like you are making excuses for a pig of a car... There is no debate against the laws of physics: heavy=bad.
      miketim1
      • 6 Months Ago
      R36 ?
      WindsWilling
      • 6 Months Ago
      Can't wait to see it. Unfortunately I doubt we'll see the R36 GT-R come in at the price the R35 did originally, swelling north of 100k. :( R35 was great, still is. Fast, great handling, etc. But there's no doubt if they were able to contain it's weight that it would be faster and nimbler. I hope they do address this.
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