As we've already learned, 2013 was a pretty big year for diesel and hybrid sales. According to registration data, there are now 7 million diesel passenger vehicles and 2.8 million hybrids on the roads in the US. Diesel registrations grew by 410,040 last year, and hybrids increased by 531,385. From 2010 to 2013, diesel registrations increased by 30 percent, and hybrid sales grew by 64.5 percent. When compared to an overall market growth of just 3.7 percent, those numbers are remarkable. Diesel Technology Forum has analyzed registration data from IHS Automotive to let us which states are leading the way in diesel and hybrid vehicle sales, (with a heavier focus on the diesel analysis).

Texas has the most diesel passenger vehicles.

Texas has the most diesel passenger vehicles, at 837,426, of which 747,760 are pickups. Wyoming has the highest percentage of diesel drivers, at 10.8 percent, while diesel registrations are fastest growing in North Dakota (up 24.1 percent). Washington DC, Illinois and Delaware are also jumping on the diesel bandwagon, each with greater than 10-percent growth from 2012 to 2013. When you exclude pickups, Illinois, Arizona, California and North Dakota have seen the largest increase by percentage in diesel car and SUV registrations, followed by Delaware, Mississippi, Texas, Idaho, Wyoming and Arkansas. Allen Schaeffer, the executive director of the Diesel Technology Forum, said in a statement that diesel sales could make up 10 percent of the US market by 2020.

California, not surprisingly, leads in the total number of hybrid vehicles (698,560), followed by Texas (153,557) and Florida (150,885), mimicking the rankings for the states with the most diesel cars and SUVs. Rounding out the top 10 hybrid states are New York, Illinois, Washington, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Georgia.

Georgia, Oklahoma and Michigan saw the most growth in hybrid registrations, at 54.3 percent, 47.4 percent, and 35.7 percent, respectively. The next seven states to see the largest hybrid growth are Illinois, Alabama, South Carolina, California, Missouri, Hawaii and Arizona.

To see all the numbers for yourself, check out Diesel Technology Forum's chart sheet here or check out the gallery of graphs. We've also got the press release below.
Show full PR text
Clean Diesel Car Registrations Increase 30% Since 2010 While Overall Market Shows Just 3.7% Increase

Washington, D.C. – California, Texas and Florida lead the U.S. with the most registrations of fuel-efficient clean diesel and hybrid passenger vehicles according to a new analysis and data released today by the Diesel Technology Forum (http://www.dieselforum.org/index.cfm).

The analysis is based on data that includes the registration statistics of all passenger vehicles – cars, SUVS, pickup trucks and vans – that were compiled by IHS Automotive (formerly R.L. Polk and Company) in all 50 states and the District of Columbia through December 31, 2013.

"Consumers have an ever-growing number of choices for more fuel-efficient vehicles and this analysis shows that clean diesels are gaining in popularity all across the nation," said Allen Schaeffer, Executive Director of the Diesel Technology Forum. "Diesel car registrations are up 30 percent since 2010 while the overall market only increased 3.6 percent.

Download a PDF of the June 2014 Top States for Diesel Drivers Press Conference Presentation

Clean Diesel Vehicles Are 30% More Fuel Efficient Than Gasoline

"Clean diesel technology is likely to continue to grow in the U.S. based on consumer acceptance of diesel as a clean and proven high-fuel economy choice. Diesels are about 30 percent more fuel efficient than gasoline vehicles and do not require compromises in vehicle performance, driving patterns or vehicle utility.

"Clean diesels also deliver a competitive or superior total-cost-of-ownership compared to other fuel efficient technologies. The increasing number of diesel offerings from manufacturers reflects their confidence in the technology and its importance as they select fuel- efficient strategies to meet the 2025 higher fuel economy requirements," Schaeffer said.

Illinois, Arizona & California Are Showing Fastest Growth in Diesel Car Registrations

According to the new data, Illinois (+25%), Arizona (+15.5%) and California (+11.3%) lead the pack of states with the fastest-growing registrations for clean diesel cars and SUVs (2013 vs. 2012).

"One of more interesting findings is the universal appeal of clean diesel cars trucks and SUVs as we see new registrations of diesel cars trucks and SUVs growing in all regions of the U.S. - red states, blue states, urban and rural regions alike," Schaeffer said. "This can be explained by clean diesel cars proven fuel efficiency and because diesel fuel is widely available at more than half of all service stations today.

Western States Like Wyoming, Montana & Idaho Have Highest Percentage of Diesels

On a percentage of all registered vehicles - cars, pickup trucks, vans, SUVs - basis, there are more diesel drivers in Western states like Wyoming (10.8%), Montana 8.1%) and Idaho (6.9%).

"Consumers there have long valued the high fuel efficiency and driving ranges of diesel vehicles - some which approach 800 miles on a single tank of fuel," Schaeffer said. "But these results show an equally high interest in clean diesel in populated and more urban states. Among the top ten states for diesel car and SUV registrations in 2013 were California, Texas, Florida, Pennsylvania, Washington, New York, Illinois, North Carolina, Virginia and New Jersey.

Diesel Pickup Trucks Are Always Popular In The West . . . And Now Gaining Ground in the Northeast

"The popularity of diesel powered pick-up trucks in Western states is a well-known, but five of the top 10 fastest growing states in 2013 for diesel pick-up trucks are Northeastern states - Vermont, Delaware, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Rhode Island," Schaeffer said.

"Pick-up trucks continue to dominate the overall registration numbers for diesel, but we can see that changing in the coming years as new diesel engine options appear in an increasing number of cars, crossovers, SUVs and light-duty and compact pick-up trucks."

Diesel & Hybrid Registrations Are Both Increasing

In 2013, diesel registrations increased by 410,040 nationally and hybrids increased by 531,385. The analysis also showed that while overall diesel sales were up 30 percent in the 2010-2013 period, hybrid sales increased by 64.5 percent.

"We fully expected that hybrids would outpace diesel sales based on the number of choices available to consumers during this timeframe," Schaeffer said. "In 2013, there were 23 diesel cars and SUV choices for consumers, but more than double that - 50 choices - of hybrids. We are poised, however, to see the number of clean diesel choices grow in the next 18 months to encompass more vehicle classes and price ranges which will make diesels increasingly accessible to more consumers. Already we know of 16 announced new clean diesel options that are coming to the U.S. later this year through 2017.

http://www.dieselforum.org/resources/clean-diesel-vehicles-currently-available-in-the-u-s-



7 Million Diesel & 2.8 Million Hybrid Passenger Vehicles Now Registered In U.S.

Among passenger vehicle registrations, diesels currently account for over 7 million vehicles while hybrids account for 2.8 million vehicles in the U.S., according to the Polk data. Diesel registrations accounted for 2.8 percent of all passenger vehicles – cars, SUVs, pickup trucks and vans. However, diesels accounted for 10.6 percent of all pickup truck registrations.

"Diesel cars and SUVs are emerging in the U.S. market," Schaeffer said. "While diesels account for about 50 percent of all auto sales in Europe, diesels are a more modest three percent in the U.S. But clean diesel vehicles are poised to take off, as evidenced by the number of clean diesels being introduced in the U.S. market and there will an estimated 60 diesels vehicles available by 2017. As a result we could see the diesel market in the U.S. reach 10 percent by 2020 as Americans learn more about the proven real world fuel efficiency benefits and long term value of the new clean diesel technology."

The following Top 10 charts and data are available online:

http://www.dieselforum.org/files/dmfile/DieselTechnologyForum-2014LightDutyTopTenLists.pdf


Annual Registration Data 2010-13

- U.S. Diesel & Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Registration Data (2010-13)

- All Vehicle Registration Date (2010-13)

Top 10 States With Highest Combined Fuel Efficient Diesel & Hybrid Passenger Vehicles

- California, Texas & Florida Have The Most Combined Diesel & Hybrid Passenger Vehicles . . .

- Wyoming, Montana & Idaho Have The Highest Percentage of Combined Diesel & Hybrid Passenger Vehicles . . .

Top 10 States for Diesel & Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Growth

- North Dakota, DC & Illinois Are Fastest Growing Diesel States . . .

- Georgia, Oklahoma & Michigan Are Fastest Growing Hybrid States . . .

Top 10 States For Total Number of Diesel & Hybrid Passenger Vehicles

- Texas, California & Florida Have the Most Diesel Vehicles . . .

- California, Texas & Florida Have the Most Hybrid Vehicles . . .

Top 10 States for Diesel Cars & Pickup Trucks

- Wyoming, Montana & Idaho Have Highest Percentage Of Diesel Passenger Vehicles . . .

- Illinois, Arizona, California & North Dakota Are Fastest Growing Diesel Car/SUV States . . .

- California, Texas & Florida Have The Most Diesel Cars/SUVs . . .

- North Dakota, Vermont & Illinois Are the Fastest Growing Diesel Pickup Truck States . . .

- Texas, California & Florida Have The Most Diesel Pickup Trucks . . .

- Wyoming, Utah & Montana Have the Highest Percentage Of Diesel Pickup Trucks . . .


North Dakota, DC & Illinois Are Fastest Growing Diesel States...


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 34 Comments
      Jim
      • 1 Year Ago
      Is the author utterly oblivious to the likelihood that almost all of the diesel vehicles in these locations are gas-guzzling full-size pickup trucks?
      Luc K
      • 1 Year Ago
      I just wouldn't call diesel truly green. But if so then add other efficient engines like 3 cylinder engines, DI, VCM, .... But source is 'Diesel Technology Forum' which certainly would like everyone to believe they are at same level as 'green' cars. And weird is that EV, PHEV or fuel cell vehicles are missing.
      EVnerdGene
      • 1 Year Ago
      Remind me; why are DIEsels on AutoBlogGREEN ? try AutoBlogChoke
      JB
      • 1 Year Ago
      Calling a diesel green is as funny as clean coal.
      Saabpunk
      • 1 Year Ago
      Wow the states with the most vehicles have the most hybrid and diesel vehicles. Next you will tell us 7 is greater than 3, and that this fact is a new increadible find. What matters is what states have the highest percent of register cars that are Hybrid or Electric, and which state has the highest percent of diesel cars. A heavy duty pickup is not green no matter what fuel it burns.
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Saabpunk
        I agree, except with this, " A heavy duty pickup is not green no matter what fuel it burns." 20 to 30% is less efficient than 80 to 90% efficiency no matter how large the vehicle or what fuel is consumed. Ergo EVPU.
          Tweaker
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EVSUPERHERO
          Put down the koolaid, No diesel is 80-90% efficient.
      4EvsHybrids
      • 1 Year Ago
      How are diesels considered clean? They emit 400 % more cancer causing pollutants according to CARB's website. The best clean diesel can only achieve a smog score of only 5 or 6, while a Hybrid has a smog score of 9 or a AT-PZEV. Those Diesel PUs, don't even ask. The true definition of Clean is a smog score 9 (AT-PZEV) or 10(ZEV). Stinky Diesels masquerading as clean? What a joke!
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 1 Year Ago
        @4EvsHybrids
        99% of all 10 yr old ICE V's that are driven 100K+ miles stink bad. Even when the ICE is rebuilt the emission parts are not. My EV's are 5 yrs old and they will be just as clean in 5 more years, most likely cleaner.
        jack smith
        • 1 Year Ago
        @4EvsHybrids
        4Evs, It all depends on the type of pollution you're looking for. CO? CO2? NOx? Volatile particulates? Gasoline produces more for some, less for others as compared to diesel. Then you have to think about actual pollution created per mile, if your average diesel creates 15% more pollution per gallon used, but is actually 20% more fuel efficient, then at what point does it break even? At what point does it start polluting less than gasoline? Also, see here: "New petrol engines cause more air pollution than dirty diesels New Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) petrol engines for cars emit more cancer-causing particles than modern diesel engines, a new study by independent vehicle researchers TÜV Nord revealed today." And then you have Berkeley's flawed study in which they compare gasoline cars to diesel tractor trailers, and use the very ambiguous term of "Secondary Organic Aerosol", which SOAs also occur naturally, and the term can be used to describe almost anything. Spray Febreeze in your house? Well THAT'S an SOA. Like the smell of steaks on the grill? That's an SOA too. A link to Berkeley's study: http://newscenter.berkeley.edu/2012/10/22/diesel-vs-gas-contributing-to-smog/ And a link as to what SOAs can be (which is almost anything) http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231008000253
          wxman
          • 1 Year Ago
          @jack smith
          @4E, Disagree with your characterization of a "smog score" of "6" as "abysmal". Even then, the "smog scores" do not necessarily address the true air quality impact of the specific vehicles. For example, the PZEV version of the VW Passat 1.8T gets a "smog rating" of "9", while the Passat TDI gets a "smog rating" of "6", yet the TDI has lower composite emissions than the 1.8T. Factor in the higher upstream emissions of gasoline, and the gap becomes even bigger. Regarding the SOA issue brought up by jack smith, all studies except the Berkeley study support the assertion that gasoline vehicles are responsible for most of the anthropogenic SOA precursors (NMOG emissions from exhaust and VOC from evaporation of gasoline). One study even goes on to say that the most recent gasoline engines have a higher specific SOA production factor than older gasoline engines.
          4EvsHybrids
          • 1 Year Ago
          @jack smith
          Stay with the benchmark facts, a CARB smog score of 5 or 6 is downright abysmal! There are a lot of independent studies done out there supporting Diesels as these are sponsored by oil companies. Get rid of these stinky diesels(Clean Ones too) out of our vehicles period!
      Luc K
      • 1 Year Ago
      Here are 2014 YTD numbers: 2014 YTD May ---------------------- Hybrid: 194K -9% Diesel: 63K +29% PHEV: 22K +60% EV: 21K + 15% These numbers do not include pick-ups so probably more apples to apples comparison.
      GoodCheer
      • 1 Year Ago
      So are we calling diesel pickup trucks in Texas "green vehicles"? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G6YxzHGFBaE
        • 1 Year Ago
        @GoodCheer
        Have you driven one of the newer VW or Audi TDIs? They are cleaner than modern gas cars and don't have the battery disposal problems of hybrids. Two of diesel fuel's environmental advantages have always been that diesel engines get better mileage than traditional gasoline engines and diesel fuel requires less refining.
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 1 Year Ago
          "Diesel fuel requires less refining." Yes and you know I can still travel 20 miles in my EV off the electricity it took to refine one gallon of diesel and you can keep the gallon of diesel. "Don't have battery disposal problems." You mean the same batteries that will be re-purposed to store clean energy from the grid so they don't have to fire up more power producing plants for peak demand.
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 1 Year Ago
          Jack Smith, I really don't care what other poisons or pollutants you can make out of trying to refine 19 gallons of diesel, if it takes 114kwh of energy then their you have it, that is what it takes to to make 19 gallons. Wind turbines kill bats, dams kill fish but I don't count those as beneficial byproducts for creating electricity. I stated that I can go 20 miles off the energy that is used to refine one gallon of diesel and you confirmed it, thank you. Then again your talking gas. Of course in the beginning it was gasoline which was always the waste product. They finally found a way to dispose of it, sell it to the public to burn in public. Second hand smoke on a global scale. I am sorry but all oil is going to waste if it is burned and the byproducts are spewed into the atmosphere we breath, Even the oil products that are not burned are killing places like the mouth of the Mississippi. Make a physical product out of oil, like plastic, asphalt, tires, etc... I am with Elon Musk on this. "We shouldn't play Russian roulette with our atmosphere, it is the only one we have." Well to wheels comparisons have been made many times in the past and gas burners on most grids come up wanting. The important thing to remember a gas car is approx 20 percent efficient and a EV is approx 80 percent efficient with the fuel it uses. You mention the average household uses 30 kwh per day. If I went a 140 miles each day, yes I would have to charge each night and would use 30 more kwh per day. To go those 140 miles in a diesel it would cost me 14 dollars per day but thanks to the inefficient grid I pay less than 3 dollars to go the same distance. According to you oil is so much more efficient, why then is it so much more expensive to propel my car down the road? I guess the electricity must be subsidized by the government a bunch, IDK. By the way you can't just throw out the process it takes to create gasoline because it is convenient for math purposes. Gas is a byproduct of all the other chemicals you are creating, you can't do one without doing the others. You can but you waste the other chemicals making the whole thing less efficient and you are so proud of this efficient process so it makes no sense to separate them. Enjoy your oil burning, I don't think your doing the future any favors.
          jack smith
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EVSUPERHERO Your idea of the energy needed to refine fuel is badly flawed. Yes we've all heard the claims that it takes 6kWh worth of energy to create 1 gallon of gas. It truly does take 114kWh worth of energy to refine one single 42 gallon barrel of oil. This barrel produces 19 gallons of gasoline, which is where the 6kWh per gallon of gas figure comes in at. However, the remaining 23 gallons are NOT wasted. They create propane, naptha, diesel, jetfuel, etc, in fact, not one single gallon in a barrel of crude goes to waste. Therefore, it truly takes 2.71kWh to refine one single gallon of gasoline, and even this isn't entirely correct. They use heat to refine crude, usually from burning natural gas, and the whole equation is done by converting the BTUs into kWh, at a 100% efficiency conversion rate of 3,500BTUs per kWh, so it takes less than 10,000BTU to refine one gallon of gas. An electric car is a great many things, but "green" is certainly not one of them. At least, not with today's grid, our energy inefficiencies, and the fuels we use to produce that energy. This may very well change one day, but that day is not today. You're certainly not saving the planet by driving one, unless you only use solar and wind power from your home. Just remember, 3,500BTU might equal 1kWh at 100% efficiency, but we have to burn 11,000BTU just to get that single kWh due to our inefficiencies. The conversion rate is only about 35% efficient, as we have to burn natural gas to create heat (chemical to heat energy), then we use the resulting steam to spin a turbine (heat to mechanical energy), and then we use the turbine to power generators (mechanical to electric conversion). Then, the grid actually loses 10% of that created energy through impedance over distance, meaning what you get out of your wall is only 25% efficient. So for every kWh you put into your electric, it took 14,000BTUs to make it. Since a Tesla model S averages 3.11 miles per kWh, and diesel contains 129,500BTUs per gallon, let's do the math: If a diesel can go 40 miles on 129,500BTUs, then a Tesla can go 28.76 miles off the same BTUs burned at the electric company. Enjoy your electric. and the average home only uses 30kWh per day per the EIA. Charging your electric is like adding another whole home to the grid.
          GoodCheer
          • 1 Year Ago
          "Texas has the most diesel passenger vehicles, at 837,426, of which 747,760 are pickups." "Have you driven one of the newer VW or Audi TDIs?" Since neither VW nor Audi make a pickup, I'm not sure how your question relates.
      CoolWaters
      • 1 Year Ago
      Diesel: the Oil Industry's dream. You burn less, price rises. Diesel: now more expensive then Premium. That's why hybrids are better, right there, without even looking at the micro-partical cancer issue.
        EVnerdGene
        • 1 Year Ago
        @CoolWaters
        DIEsels have both macro and micro particles. Macro get stuck in your lungs. Micro have been traced to heart and blood disease.
          EVnerdGene
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          from EPA website: VW Golf TDI 297g/mi, rated 6 out of 10 for nasty emissions Toy Prius 197g/mi, rated 9/10 for nasty emissions Chebbie Cruze 268 g/mi, rated 8/10 for nasty emissions Yes, VW definitely makes the cleanest, quietest, and smoothest running DIEsels; that poop their clogged filter when at or above boulevard speeds when no one will notice, and most of their emission system components will not last into 6-digit mileage. Question: 1. Compared with Vdub DIEsels; why are American and Italian (Chrysler) DIEsels pickups still so obnoxiously stinky, and with visual soot at every change in throttle position? 2. Why is the EPA not only allowing these gross polluters on our roads, they actually condone and promote their use? Sick Let me get this straight; DIEsel vehicles cost more up front, fuel cost more, societal (emissions) costs higher, but but but the engines last longer, so people can drive their poop generators even longer instead of crushing for better emissions technology, and most will need major emissions system component replacements well before 100k, or ? bypass the controls ? Within 5 years, gasoline powered engines will surpass DIEsels in fuel efficiency, as DIEsels lose efficiency trying to make cleaner. DIEsels emission tech vs. efficiency will never again match gasser tech.
          EVnerdGene
          • 7 Months Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          open webpage click on "energy and environment" tab
          wxman
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          The ACTUAL certified emissions of the 2014 Ram 2500 gas and diesel per CARB... NMHC - 0.004 g/mi (Diesel); 0.088 g/mi (Gas) NOx - 0.15 g/mi (Diesel); 0.1 g/mi (Gas) CO - 0.1 g/mi (Diesel); 2.6 g/mi (Gas) PM - 0.001 g/mi (Diesel); ------ g/mi (Gas) http://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/onroad/cert/pcldtmdv/2014/chrysler_mdv_a0091199_5d7-6d4_u2.pdf (5.7 gasoline) http://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/onroad/cert/pcldtmdv/2014/cummins_mdv_a0210593_6d7_u2_diesel.pdf (6.7 Diesel)
          wxman
          • 7 Months Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          Better than pooping in my fresh air 100% of the time.
          EVnerdGene
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=34721&id=33353
          wxman
          • 7 Months Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          Oh, and back to the particle emission discussion. Take a look at the black carbon (BC, i.e., "soot") emissions graphic during the cold-start phase of FTP75 of both GDI and PFI gasoline engines at 0 degrees F at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es501791b. In cold ambient conditions, the BC emissions are over 10 times higher than the standard (lucky for gassers that the certified emissions are conducted at room temp!) The HIGHEST emissions I've seen with a diesel even during regeneration is about 7 mg/mi, which still meets the PM standard. The remaining 98% of the drive time (i.e., NO DPF regeneration), diesels emit around 0.01 mg/mile, or about 1000 times lower than the Tier 2/LEV II PM standard. So explain why you keep wringing your hands over the trivial PM emissions from modern diesels, yet turn a blind eye on high PM emissions from gassers under certain conditions?
          wxman
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          And everyone knows that diesels are the ONLY source of "macro" and "micro" particles, right Gene? Or maybe not... "...Eighty three per cent of particulate matters emissions in European Union countries (EEA, 2012a) and 97 per cent in the United States of America (EPA 2013) and Canada is generated by other economic sectors, mainly the commercial, institutional and household sector...." http://www.unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/trans/main/wp5/publications/Diesel_Engines_Exhausts_Myths_and_Realities_2014.pdf [Page 41]
          EVnerdGene
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          @Waxman Duhhh, admit it; you just like the DIEsel-rattle and stench think it makes you studly. With DIEsels so much more common in the EU than the US, your statistics kinda prove their contribution to particulate pollution.
          wxman
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          To address your questions/comments as presented... The "smog ratings" you presented do not necessarily address the true air quality impacts of the specific vehicles. For example, the PZEV version of the 2014 VW Passat 1.8T gets a "smog rating" of "9", while the Passat TDI gets a "smog rating" of "6", yet the TDI has lower composite emissions than the 1.8T. Factor in the higher upstream emissions of gasoline, and the gap becomes even bigger. Post-2007 pickup trucks (or any other on-road diesel for that matter) have no visible emissions or any detectable odor. The official certified emissions of the Dodge Ram diesel is far lower than the certified emissions of the corresponding Ram 5.7 gasoline. A comprehensive study was conducted on current-technology HD over-the-road diesel trucks recently ("Advanced Collaborative Emissions Study") which documents the near-zero emissions of diesels over a wide variety of test duty cycles. The diesels are almost always lower in certified emissions than the corresponding gasser. CARB is probably as institutionally hostile to diesels as there is, so I don't know what your point is about EPA "promoting" diesels. Anything but. I'm not arguing the up-front cost or higher fuel cost, only that you are demonstrably wrong about the environmental impacts of diesels. We've been hearing for years that direct-injection gasoline engines will catch diesels in overall efficiency, but the gap between diesels and the corresponding gasoline versions of those vehicles is still on average about 30% based on official EPA mileage estimates as it has been for more than a decade (and which EPA itself acknowledges is low-biased against diesels relative to gassers and hybrids), and most of the corresponding gasoline versions are now GDI. So we'll see in 5 years if SI gassers will actually surpass diesels in fuel efficiency. That trend is not really materializing.
          EVnerdGene
          • 7 Months Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          "The remaining 98% of the drive time (i.e., NO DPF regeneration), " So pooping in my fresh air 2% of the time is OK ? nuff said
          wxman
          • 1 Year Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          No Gene, it only proves that Europe has more legacy diesels in its vehicle mix. Your gasser emits lots of particle emissions whether you want to admit it or not. My Diesel doesn't rattle or stink (has zero detectable smell). Maybe you should try a different tactic. You're just discrediting yourself with your endless "DIEsel" and "stink" attacks on modern diesel technology.
      CoolWaters
      • 1 Year Ago
      Pennsylvania Kicks Ohio's ***.
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