Along with racing triumph at the Isle of Man TT comes tragedy. This year's racing has unfortunately seen two fatalities already with the 2014 TT races running from May 31 to June 6.

The first death was 65-year-old racer Bob Price (pictured above) of Gloucestershire, England, during the third lap of the Supersport class race on June 2. He had been racing in various events at the TT since 1992 and was even runner-up in the Senior Classic in 2002, according to the BBC News.

Tragedy struck again on June 3 when Karl Harris, 34, from Sheffield, England, crashed during the second lap of the Superstock class race, according to Fox Sports. He began racing in the TT in 2012 but was an experienced motorcycle racer in Britain and won the 1999 European Superstock 1,000cc Championship, according to a press release from TT organizer ACU Events Ltd.

Our condolences go out to the friends and families of both riders. Scroll down to read the official statements from ACU Events.
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STATEMENT ISSUED ON BEHALF OF THE ACU

Monday June 2, 2014 at 7:39pm

ACU Events Ltd regrets to announce that Bob Price, 65, from Stroud, Gloucester was killed during the Supersport 1 Race at the Isle of Man TT races today following an incident at Ballaugh on the 3rd lap of the race.

Bob, a car body repair shop owner, was an experienced road racer who first competed at the TT Races in 1992 and competed regularly in the Manx Grand Prix as a Classic racer.

Highlights of his Mountain Course career included 3rd place in the MGP Junior Classic in 2002 and runner up position in the same year in the Senior Classic. He also achieved third place in the 2004 Junior Classic MGP and took part in last year's inaugural Classic TT Races.

The ACU wishes to pass on their deepest sympathy to Bob's family and friends.

The Coroner of Inquests has been informed and an investigation into the circumstances of the accident is underway

STATEMENT ISSUED ON BEHALF OF ACU EVENTS LTD - KARL HARRIS

Tuesday June 3, 2014 at 7:26pm

ACU Events Ltd regrets to announce that Karl Harris, 34, from Sheffield was killed during the Superstock Race at the Isle of Man TT races today following an incident at Joey's on the 2nd lap of the race.
Harris, a professional Motorbike racer, made his TT Races debut in 2012. He was a triple British Supersport Champion and British Superbike podium finisher.

Harris appeared on the racing scene as a teenager in the 1990s, when he rode for Team Great Britain in the Superteen Championship. From there, Harris went on to win the 1999 European Superstock 1000cc Championship before spending a season in the World Supersport Championship.

He was best known for his British Championship career. He was the dominant force in the British Supersport Championship in the early 2000s before becoming a prominent front-runner in the Superbike class for the factory Suzuki, Honda and Yamaha teams.

Harris won three British Supersport Championships between 2001 and 2004, the first for Crescent Suzuki and the remaining two for Honda Racing, before progressing full time to the premier Superbike category in 2005. His best season came in 2006 when he finished in 5th place overall recording 6 podiums. In total, Harris notched up 12 BSB podiums.

The ACU wishes to pass on their deepest sympathy to Karl's family and friends.

Gary Thompson, TT Clerk of the Course, ACU Events, said:

"Karl was one of the great characters in the race paddock. His infectious enthusiasm and sense of humour lit up many race meetings. He was a hugely talented racer and will be sorely missed."

The Coroner of Inquests has been informed and an investigation into the circumstances of the accident is underway.


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  • 43 Comments
      GR
      • 6 Months Ago
      The Isle of Man TT is like no other. In an era of warning signs, government mandated controls, speed limits, and simply others telling you what to do and the time, this race defies all that. 200 MPH on closed public roads on 2 wheels. It's dangerous, it's insanely fast, and it's grueling. Each and every man and woman who races it knows the risks yet decides to race. I'm no motorcycle rider and really can't relate to these or other riders, but I've seen my fair share of Isle of Man TT videos and documentaries. What I like most are the actual riders and how they are really rather ordinary people doing extraordinary things. Some of the fastest riders are fishermen and plumbers when they aren't racing since the TT and motorcycle racing doesn't reward you very much financially. Unlike the egos, fame, and wealth you see so commonly flaunted in professional sports by professional athletes, Isle of Man TT riders are a stark and humbling contrast. Ordinary people doing insanely extraordinary things. In this regard, I have a high amount of respect for them and when one perishes, I feel the sense of loss, however they exemplify the special quality of dying doing what you loved which is ever so rare in this day and age of regulations, controls, and limits. RIP.
      Clipper44
      • 6 Months Ago
      I lost my father in a motorcycle wreck.. it's an amazingly tough deal to reconcile for the surviving family something so dangerous yet so passionately loved by riders... Condolences to the rider's families.
      NNIsFinest
      • 6 Months Ago
      RIP they do what we love and they do it a the absolute limit. Whatever your thing is cars or bikes or both you cannot admire the passion, commitment, and sacrifice
      cantera.developments
      • 6 Months Ago
      Rest in peace - Racers. Condolences to there friends and families. "If you are not living on the edge, your taking up too much space" They lived and breathed this way of life. Respect.
      Avinash Machado
      • 6 Months Ago
      May they rest in peace.
      husam
      • 6 Months Ago
      i'm a long time motorcyclist, and have always been a fan of the TT. my attitude has always been live and let live (or die, as it were). but i'm slowly starting to rethink the merits of this race. one of the motogp riders (Scott Redding) said bike technology is outgrowing the TT course, and i think he's spot on. Bikes will continue to get faster every year, and as a result, the stone wall lined streets of the Isle of Man will continue getting narrower every year. On a proper racing course you can add run-off, put up impact barriers, etc. There's nowhere to go on the Isle of Man.
        rsholland
        • 6 Months Ago
        @husam
        Couldn't agree more.
        Poe
        • 6 Months Ago
        @husam
        As long as the IOM TT remains a standalone event - not REQUIRED for any series - I think it should continue. Motorcycle racing is inherently dangerous... it's up to the individual racers to decide how much risk they're willing to accept and decide to participate or not. That said, I do think more could be done to make the course safer - although it will never be "safe". Nor will ANY race course.
          rsholland
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Poe
          I can accept that. One thing that can be done is reduce the engine displacement. For the better part of the last century the TT race classes were: 125cc, 250cc, 350cc and 500cc. Today the race classes span from 600cc to 1000cc, to better reflect what riders can actually buy at their local bike dealer. Easy access to high-powered large-displacement and hyper-powerful road bikes is a big part of the problem. The old, low-displacement bikes reflected the street bikes of that bygone era. Back then the TT—while still very dangerous—was better able to handle those bikes; not so today.
        Lewis
        • 6 Months Ago
        @husam
        I have to respectfully disagree. The technology is not outgrowing the course, it is a 37 plus mile lap with 200 plus mph straightaways and hairpins with every type of tarmac and condition in between. If anything, technology has not been able to make the riders much faster than they are now. I would wager Mr. Redding would have his rear handed to him by many of the TT regulars on a 1000cc Superstock and he could ride a full on factory MotoGP bike. The TT left the GP calendar due to the factory riders protesting. Truth be told, very few of the MotoGP riders would dare turn a wheel in competition here and if they did, would get smoked by the McGuinesses and Dunlops. It would definitely be an ego bruising.
      Technoir
      • 6 Months Ago
      Riding a bike is one of the most fun activities ever, but it carries a high risk.... RIP.
      big2.5
      • 6 Months Ago
      Was it worth it?
        speedracerx808
        • 6 Months Ago
        @big2.5
        What kind of dumb ass question is that? Are you saying living life isn't worth it? Doing something you love isn't worth it? Everyone dies, you make the most of life while you can.
          rsholland
          • 6 Months Ago
          @speedracerx808
          What a dumb ass *selfish* comment. What about the rider's family? They have to put their lives back together. There are a lot of world-class professional riders who refuse to do the TT. Why? It's too dangerous. Since 1911, 242 riders have been killed at the Isle of Man.
          speedracerx808
          • 6 Months Ago
          @speedracerx808
          No what's dumb are people like you, who think that just because something is dangerous, it means you shouldn't take chances. It's like you are saying Senna was selfish because of how he raced, he took plenty of chances and died doing what he loved. Price was 65. It's not like he had a 5 year old that was left fatherless. He could have gotten hit by a car on the street, not at the TT, or got cancer. They would still have to put their lives back together. How many people die every day just because they got behind the wheel of a car? They know what they are risking, and they do as much to mitigate that risk as possible. Death is never ideal, but you can't just avoid life because "it makes it might make it hard on your family." Guess what, one day it will happen, whether you avoid all danger or not. And your anecdotal point of world-class riders who refuse to race means nothing. Because there are a ton of world class riders who do race it. Karl Harris was a British sportbike champion. The selfish thing is your opinion, that you think others shouldn't do what they love because they might have something bad happen. If that was the case, no one would race cars or motorcycles, we wouldn't have people that risk their lives every day like the military, firemen, police. We wouldn't have sent people to the moon. We would have oil drillers, coal miners, people that work with infectious diseases, so on and so forth.
          rsholland
          • 6 Months Ago
          @speedracerx808
          @ speedracerx808 Can't argue with you about doing something you love. Can argue with you about choices made. I have no problem with motorcycles or motorcycle racing. I spent several years of riding nothing but bikes—year-round, as I didn't have a car. Several of those bikes were pretty powerful, and one being a "superbike." Even went to the Daytona 200 a couple of times, not to mention other bike road races, and countless motocross races. So I understand bikes—and I get it. Bike racing is dangerous. That being the case why choose a course that has claimed 242 lives? You can get your jollies on a *safer* dedicated race track than on public roads. That's all I'm saying. Yeah, there is only one TT, and I see and understand it's appeal. I just don't think the risk is worth it. Finally I sense you're not married and/or don't have kids. I just became a grandfather. Maybe when you get to my age your perspective will change.
      imtoomuch1
      • 6 Months Ago
      This is a VOLUNTARY race. Those that have died were in control of the bikes. They made mistakes and they paid the ultimate price. Is it horrible? I don't know. We all die. Some of us die doing things we love and others die a slow, long, and painful death in a hospital bed from an incurable disease. Which would you choose? Either way, I think we should have the FREEDOM to do what we want. Neither the race nor the bikes should be limited in any way. That goes against the human spirit of trying to do more, go faster, live freer, and test the limits of man and machine. I hate being told what to do. The government imposes more rules every year because of people, such as many of those in the comments below, that are scared to live and those that refuse to take responsibility for their own actions. If you don't want to race, go into your house, sit on the couch in front of your TV and be safe. Let the others have fun!
        SCOTTM
        • 6 Months Ago
        @imtoomuch1
        Right on man and well said. The younger generations are, for the most part, sheltered wussies. Masculinity and what it means to be an alpha male is being destroyed by the MSM each day with promotion of the metrosexual "feminization" of man. It really upsets me. Helmets for everybody no matter where you go or what you do. It's just ridiculous. Some of us are not afraid of death and are okay with meeting our maker. It's my decision if and when I want to take calculated risks. Blame testosterone. Blame the prehistoric wiring of man's brain. Whatever. Real men will always live life to the fullest and will always be attracted to risk and the gratification that comes from triumph over adversity.
        rsholland
        • 6 Months Ago
        @imtoomuch1
        "Those that have died were in control of the bikes." Really?
      John Ralphio
      • 6 Months Ago
      League of Legends.
      upthewazooforus
      • 6 Months Ago
      Sorry, they must have forgotten that this site revolved around you, young insensitive Bayard.
      fran
      • 6 Months Ago
      I just hope Guy Martin is safe.
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