Okay America, this has gotten silly. A new study by Edmunds has revealed what we've always kind of known – people don't like going car shopping. What we didn't realize, though, is why, and what they'd rather do (or not do) to avoid a trip to the dealer.

Really, it comes down to the haggle. According to Edmunds, 83 percent of the 1,002 people surveyed would rather avoid haggling, with nine out of 10 saying they'd be more excited about the car-buying process if it meant a haggle-free experience (Saturn, you were on to something).

What's ridiculous, though, is just how much people hate the haggle. One in five said they'd willingly give up sex for a month rather than haggle for a new car. Another 44 percent said they'd be willing to give up Facebook while 29 percent would happily turn over their cell phones for a weekend to avoid sitting down with a dealer.

Even more worrying, though, are the number of people that'd simply prefer to avoid the car-buying experience all together. One in three people surveyed said they'd rather do taxes, go to the DMV or sit in an airplane's middle seat if it meant not having to go through the purchasing rigmarole (somehow, we don't think the 1,000 people surveyed have ever done taxes, gone to the DMV or sat in a middle seat before).

There are more interesting insights in Edmunds full results, which you can view below in the associated press release.
Show full PR text
When It Comes To Car Shopping, Edmunds.com Finds That Americans Hate The Haggle So Much, They'd Give Up Sex, Facebook And Smartphones To Avoid It
Fortunately, Edmunds.com Introduces "Car Week" to Make Car Shopping Easier

SANTA MONICA, Calif., June 3, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Car shopping site Edmunds.com conducted a survey of more than 1,000 U.S. adults and learned that Americans claim purchasing a car or truck is more stressful than getting married, going on a first date or watching their team in a close championship game.

"Nine out of 10 respondents wish car shopping was easier. We don't see any difference in the experience when looking at gender, age, geography or any other demographic variances," said Edmunds.com's CEO, Avi Steinlauf. "It's clear that the average shopper is craving a better way to buy a car."

Having more trust in the purchase price would relieve a lot of stress for car shoppers. The survey found:

Nine out of 10 car shoppers would be more excited to purchase a vehicle if it had a set price they felt good about, rather than having to haggle
Ninety-four percent would buy a car from a dealership where they were guaranteed to save thousands off of sticker price on a new vehicle
Online resources are the highest-rated sources of car advice across all demographics
American car shoppers loathe haggling over price; in fact, 83 percent of respondents prefer to avoid it. Among Millennial respondents, this number jumps to 91 percent, compared to 78 percent of Boomers. How much do shoppers hate the haggle?

One in five Americans (21%) would rather say sayonara to sex for a month than haggle over the price of a car; 44 percent would give up Facebook for one month and 29 percent would turn over their Smartphone for a weekend if it meant avoiding the haggle
One in three Americans (33%) would rather go to the DMV, do their taxes or sit in the middle airplane seat than go through the process of buying a car
Between the Generational Divide and Mars versus Venus, Americans disagree on who to trust when it comes to car buying advice:

Women are twice as likely as men to seek advice from a family member who is not their parent
Baby Boomers are twice as likely as Millennials to trust their mechanic
Baby Boomers are also three times more likely than Millennials to say they have never received good car buying advice
Friends are consistently rated as the worst source for car buying advice and are twice as likely to be cited as a source of bad advice than a source of good advice
In a continued effort to make it easier to buy a new car or truck, car shopping site Edmunds.com is kicking off the first-ever "Car Week" from June 9 - June 15, 2014. Modeled after successful Restaurant Week events that have introduced diners to local restaurants for over 20 years, Car Week connects shoppers in the Los Angeles and New York metro areas to hundreds of local dealers offering prices at or below Edmunds.com's True Market Value®, which means shoppers can save thousands off sticker price without wasting a second on negotiating through Edmunds.com's Price Promise® program. Participating dealers are also featuring extra promotions, savings and events. More information can be found by visiting www.Edmunds.com/carweek.

Methodology
The Edmunds.com Car Week Survey was conducted online within the United States by USamp on behalf of Edmunds.com from May 2-10, 2014 among 1,002 adult (18+) car owners/intended owners. Age, gender, and region quotas were set to match current U.S. Census figures. USamp handled the incentive for survey takers, who chose from over 200 different rewards-including cash, gift cards, or charitable contributions.

About Edmunds.com, Inc.
Edmunds.com is a car-shopping Web site driven to make car buying easy. Almost 18 million visitors use our shopping tools every month to connect with nearly 10,000 dealer franchises across the U.S. Shoppers can browse our inventory listings for available cars and trucks, and with Edmunds.com's Price PromiseSM, they can get an instant, upfront price on those same vehicles. Recently named the "Highest Ranked Third-Party Automotive Web Site" according to J.D. Power's 2014 Third-Party Automotive Website Evaluation StudySM, Edmunds.com is also home to comprehensive car reviews, shopping tips, photos, videos and feature stories. Even when you're at the dealership, we're always by your side. Just call our free Live Help Line at 1-855-782-4711, text ED411 or use our acclaimed Edmunds.com iPhone and iPad apps or Edmunds.com Android App. Edmunds.com also founded Car Week, a special week-long event that connects more car shoppers with dealers. We're based in Santa Monica, Calif., but you can connect with us from anywhere by following @Edmunds on Twitter or by becoming a fan of Edmunds.com on Facebook.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 200 Comments
      Actionable Mango
      • 6 Months Ago
      YES. When I bought a car, I negotiated down the price. I kept insisting over and over that we were talking about an "out the door" price, including any and all fees, taxes, etc. When the salesman brought up the paperwork, the price was discounted, but there were other fees and add-ons all over the place that had not been mentioned. I pointed this out and the salesman apologized for the "mistake". When the next paperwork arrived, I checked to see that the add-ons were all removed, and they were. But then I double checked the purchase price only to find it had "mysteriously" gone up. I pointed this out and the salesman apologized again for this second "mistake". When the third set of paperwork arrived for me to sign, I took a good 45 minutes to read it all through and check everything, and I still feel like he probably scammed me some how. The whole process took over 4 hours. I can't even imagine buying a new car again. I'd rather set myself on fire.
        James Dailey
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Actionable Mango
        Can you imagine a reputable company doing this to you? Would you ever shop a second time at a store that did this to you? The dealership model is broken. NADA better keep buying regulators off, because without regulatory protection, they simply can't last.
          Dean Hammond
          • 6 Months Ago
          @James Dailey
          thats actually incorrect...there are more laws to protect buyers against underhanded practices than ever before...and its under a constant microscope from such entities as the DMV....not saying theres some that still operate in bad manners , but the Industry is very strongly regulated...
        marv.shocker
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Actionable Mango
        They tried that with me when I bought my truck. That's why it's important to know ahead of time exactly what model you want, what the typical price is, and what your credit score is. For me, if he brought that paperwork back with all that sh*t on it, I'd say, "This isn't what we agreed on" and start walking out. They'll chase you out the door and probably offer you a better deal than you originally discussed.
        Dean Hammond
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Actionable Mango
        thats just a bad dealership...those practices are pre-historic.
      Terry Actill
      • 6 Months Ago
      My last purchase was going great until the finance manager put his ugly face in. You should be able to punch him at least once during the negotiations.
        Brian Brown
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Terry Actill
        I skip the finance guy altogether. I always come in with a pre-approval from my bank that states the maximum I am allowed to borrow. This is an actual form that the dealer fills out and they are issued an E-check immediately for the value negotiated. They fill in their info, put the dollar amount for the loan and we both sign it. I never show the dealer this during negotiation and tell the finance guy to go screw himself with his "ultra low APR finance deal". That same deal screws the customer out of significant amounts of cash back nearly every time. The finance guy will still always ask me what rate I got from my bank, and always tries to hold back a look of disgust when I tell him somewhere around 1-2%. I always get better deals from my bank, but people don't think about these things when going in to buy a car. I get all my ducks in a row and then just go buy the thing for the best price I can get. Sites like TrueCar can really help in this situation.
        johnb
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Terry Actill
        yeah, the dreaded finance manager.
          superchan7
          • 6 Months Ago
          @johnb
          Dean Hammond: You know what's funny, I bought a new car in November, all cash. The "Finance Manager" still manages to steal the show by complaining to you about how little they're making, and throwing obnoxious jokes to tell you you're ripping them off.
          Mark
          • 6 Months Ago
          @johnb
          You mean Lienance Manager.
          Dean Hammond
          • 6 Months Ago
          @johnb
          can agree there, of course there is the option of you jumping from bank to bank yourself in search of the best rate....once again...YOU HAVE OPTIONS PEOPLE...but god forbid you spend your own time doing that...
          superchan7
          • 6 Months Ago
          @johnb
          The clown of the dealership!
      Tes
      • 6 Months Ago
      First, why there are two prices listed, msrp & invoice and then destination is always extra. Why not have a normal one price like other new products with no haggling allowed and simply offer discounts. Second, yes, I want to be able to buy the car over the internet, the only time I would want to step into dealership is to pick up the car, but wouldn't mind if they deliver it to my door as well. Yes, there are instances when you have a trade that you need to be present, but that could also be optimized.
        gary
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Tes
        There's an invoice price for every new product you buy, from a car to a gallon of milk. Difference is, nobody knows the invoice price on anything but cars. As for "destination," its usually different for Alaska and Hawaii (for obvious reasons) so that's why it's itemized separately. As for buying over the internet, only stepping in the dealership to pick up your new car, you can do that at most new car dealerships (and many used car dealerships) already.
      JeepinBen
      • 6 Months Ago
      I've had great and terrible experiences at dealers and it always comes down to the salesperson and their attitude. The guy I bought from shook my hand, asked "what are you here to see?" and said "let's drive one". I've had dealers ask me to come, shoe me brochures, sit in offices for 15 minutes, only to go see the car and notice that it had 2 pedals, not 3 as promised. If dealers want more buyers, get better salespeople.
        Bernard
        • 6 Months Ago
        @JeepinBen
        There are nice sales people, but you will never see internet prices on showroom cars unless it was the listed price for that specific car.
        Dean Hammond
        • 6 Months Ago
        @JeepinBen
        BINGO...its NOT what you know its WHO. Quandry is the only way to keep good sales people is supply them with an income on which they can survive, with the ever shrinking profitability in vehicles I think you will have a tough time finding someone willing to stay in the business, dealing with retail of any sort is a tought road to hoe.
        Dean Hammond
        • 6 Months Ago
        @JeepinBen
        @Bernard....funny how you are assuming the Internet price is the best you can get.....after all, it must be since its on a Computer screen correct.......
      express2day
      • 6 Months Ago
      Haggling still took and takes place all the time at so called no-haggle dealerships like Saturn on things like trade value, freebies, etc. Instead of negotiating or haggling a discount off MSRP, it was/is negotiated via the trade value. Regardless, I don't think dealers like to haggle either. If customers were willing to pay the MSRP or first price offered, no haggling would need to take place. It's consumers that initiate haggling....and I fall into the category of wanting to haggle or negotiate when shopping for a car. Overall, haggling is very common on big ticket items like real estate, cars, RVs, boats, etc. It is less common on low price items because any potential savings simply isn't worth the time. Using coupons, price matching policies, shopping around, etc. is more or less the substitute for "haggling" on cheaper stuff.
      R S
      • 6 Months Ago
      As a salesperson/scum I think I would like to point out that I just sold $46,000 Van. I made a grand total of $100 dollars for spending the whole day with these customers. The problem is that with the advent of internet a dealer can not make a fair profit to pay its staff fairly or keep a staff that is willing to work for that kind of money. I know there is someone reading this saying bs, but doesnt make a difference what i say(just scum car guy). I also understand being a customer when purchasing other things besides cars, and I dont blame the customer either. What I do blame is the dealer owners for their horrible advertising that gets the customer in and then they get mad when a customer wants that price. The business has just turned into "what is your best price" and then let me email the other three dealerships in the area. I again dont blame the customer either on that, what I do get mad at is I wasted eight years of my life to being a professional and caring. I am now looking to leave the business. I am really emabarrassed that I stayed this long. To the customers, I know price is important, but please remember that we have families and do deserve to make a living. If it is only about price, then please walk in and pay for the car and leave. Don't ask me anything, I will be more than happy to fill out your paperwork for the $100 bucks.
        raughle1
        • 6 Months Ago
        @R S
        The problem is that filling out the paperwork is really all you're doing at this point. Not trying to be rude, but what value are you adding to the car-buying process?
          R S
          • 6 Months Ago
          @raughle1
          You may know what you want, but 90% of the people I deal with dont. They are clueless. I don't know how many times I have suggested a different car or model to fit the customers needs. How I have actually saved them money. The problem is the whole system, it needs revamped. I read all these posts about salesman not knowing the product, that is the result of the internet and that anyone with some smarts not wanting to deal with some customer for 100 bucks. The people that would make great salesman leave because of how unfair that business is to them. I did the math, I added up all my sales last year and my cut was .002. That is not 2% of the selling price price of vehicle, its .002. So next time you feel that you want to beat the poor salesman across the desk for 5 dollars a month or spend 2hrs with salesman on the lot and buy it somewhere cause it was 100 bucks less. Remember that is why he is being scum.
          Anonymous Coward
          • 6 Months Ago
          @raughle1
          @R S, you must be talking about the times you convinced people to buy the cruze instead of the Volt?
        Weapon
        • 6 Months Ago
        @R S
        The problem is with the entire dealership model. Most people after retiring from being a dealer feel a sense of relief and a sense of shame of what they did as it is very soul shattering. Look, no one is blaming you the salesperson/scum. The issue is with the system itself. The system worked fine early on in history but in modern day it became obsolete. And now being held up by monopolistic laws. This creates an environment for both the dealer and the consumer that drives people insane. If the laws were removed and dealerships had to truly compete in a free market. You would find most dealerships owned by manufacturers. Cars be cheaper for consumers. The process would be less of a burden. Those dealerships not owned by manufacturers would be for high luxury brands offering a personalized experience for the high end buyer. Which would cost more but you pay for the service as they say.
      Edsel
      • 6 Months Ago
      The reason why I keep my vehicles till the wheels fall off is due to my anticipation of having to negotiate with liars, cheats and scoundrels at the stealership. Doesn't matter which brand. BMW to Kia, the sales people and sales managers SUCK. I suppose their thieving attitudes are saving me money by delaying a new vehicle purchase every ten+ years. My truck is currently 14 years old.
        Dean Hammond
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Edsel
        Im afraid of my own shadow as well......
        superchan7
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Edsel
        Remember, you're the boss. You don't like it, leave and yell at them for lying and wasting your time. Don't let yourself fear them!
          Edsel
          • 6 Months Ago
          @superchan7
          I raised my voice years ago during a negotiation for a VW and I was told they would call the police if I continued. They were trying to add pinstrips, wax treatments and upholstery protection for $800.00 after the negotiated price. I walked out. I didn't have the time or inclination to argue with them.
      Jr
      • 6 Months Ago
      A huge part of the problem with the car-buying experience is Kelley Blue Book...or rather what people think Kelley Blue Book is/does. YOU WILL NEVER GET KBB VALUE FOR YOUR CAR WHEN YOU TRADE IT IN!!!NEVER!!!! KBB is based on a number of assumptions that don't apply to the real world. Also, KBB does not purchase vehicles! So it's easy for them to say a car is woth any amount. Here's the only question you need to ask yourself when you value your car on KBB, will KBB write you a check for that amount to buy your trade ?
      knightrider_6
      • 6 Months Ago
      One of our local dealer tried that in two dealerships. Didn't last long. The problem was that their no-haggle price was higher than what you would pay after a good negotiation.
      owenrec
      • 6 Months Ago
      The entire car buying process is terrible. I'm very good at negotiating, and in the current climate I usually just email every dealer that has what I need and tell them what I want to pay for it. Usually I end up somewhere around $500 under invoice minus any rebates or incentives. The dealer still makes their holdback and any bullshit $200 doc fee they throw in. What drives me crazy is the insane time waste, and that 90% of the time the sales guy has no clue what they are doing. I always end up knowing more about the cars than they do. Isn't there any training for these people? They seem to have their phrases down pat "What can I do to get you in this car today?" But they don't know what is included on the various trim levels. I would happily patronize any dealership that was transparent with their process. A big sign on the wall that says "Every car is $X dollars over/under invoice and every sale includes the following charges: (Tax, doc, whatever)" I just dont want to waste hours of my time with some baffoon who doesnt know the product and is intent on being deceptive. Even worse is when you are finally all done with the haggle and are then subjected to some finance boob trying to sell you a warranty. It's horrific.
        JTS
        • 6 Months Ago
        @owenrec
        Amen to that owenrec. I think some dealers like that they make you sit all day while they "go talk to their manager". It's like they know if you get sitting long enough, you'll eventually cave in and pay whatever they want just to get the experience over.
        Jr
        • 6 Months Ago
        @owenrec
        I hear a lot of complaints about product knowledge. It's true any sales professional will know his product inside and out. What the customer needs to realize is that there is much more to a vehicle purchase than what feature comes on what trim level. Also, the customer shops around for a car (usually online) once every couple of years at most. The guy on the dealer lot has to know an entire product line, with several trim levels each plus option packages within each trim level. Add to that mid-year changes, and constant updates/upgrades in each model year and it's not so difficult to imagine that a sales guy may not know every last nut and bolt on every car. Also, what you may see in an OEM website or online "configurators" may nor be the reality on the ground. You can build any car in any way you desire online, but that doesn't guarantee the OEM has actually builds it that way and has sent them to your local dealer.
          raughle1
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Jr
          The guy on the lot has to know the whole product line. Yes he does!. And I fail to see why our expectation should be any less. That frigging dude is spending 8 hours a day at that Honda dealer. What the F is he doing with his time that he hasn't learned the difference between an EX and an LX??? I think your argument is valid for used cars ... I don't expect that same Honda salesman to know the features on the 2005 Saab he just got on trade. But he damn well better know if the alloy wheels on that new Civic cost extra. Why wouldn't he???
      drewbiewhan
      • 6 Months Ago
      It's especially bad when enthusiasts like us go car shopping... I love having a salesman that knows less than I do about the car (sarcasm)
      superlightv12
      • 6 Months Ago
      Bought my new car in November of last year. When I think about it, I get pissed. I was a repeat customer who has brought in other customers. I didn't really negotiate the selling price except to get the $800 loyal buyer deal. I knew what I wanted and I knew what my trade was worth. That's where the problem was. They basically offered me half of the Kelly Blue Book value for a car in poor condition. It was an insult. I bought it there and it was very well maintained. Then I had to play the wait game, where they act like they are doing something special for you. What should have taken 45 minutes took 3 hours. I did get what I wanted for my trade, but they lost me as a repeat customer. Eff them, I'll never go back or recommend them again.
    • Load More Comments