• Image Credit: Volvo
  • Image Credit: Volvo
  • Image Credit: Volvo
  • Image Credit: Volvo
  • Image Credit: Volvo
  • Image Credit: Volvo
  • Image Credit: Volvo
  • Image Credit: Volvo
  • Image Credit: Volvo
  • Image Credit: Volvo
  • Image Credit: Volvo
Another Swedish family is taking the One Tonne Life eco-challenge from Volvo and is enjoying the results. This time, it's the Jogensjö family, which is taking on the challenge three years after the Lindell family did the same. Only the Jogensjös get to drive around in a Volvo V60 Plug-in Hybrid, whereas the Lindells had to "make due" with a Volvo C30 battery-electric.

All things considered, the Jogensjö family is producing about half the carbon emissions of a typical Swedish family by driving the plug-in while living in the so-called One Tonne Life house developed by A-hus. Among other energy-saving touches, that 1,700-square-foot, super-energy-efficient house includes about 1,100 square feet of solar panels on its roof and facade, giving the house enough juice to serve the family while even sending a little extra back to the grid for some extra cash. In addition to A-hus and Volvo, energy company Vattenfall is a partner in the project.

The original Lindell family took the One Tonne Challenge starting in early 2011 and was charged with cutting its emissions by about 85 percent compared to the footprint of a typical Swedish family. Check out Volvo's press release below and get more details on the project, and the Jogensjö family's results, here.
Show full PR text
The One Tonne Life project three years on: Pilot project enables climate-smart lifestyle

Three years on from the end of One Tonne Life, this ground-breaking project, initiated by A-hus, Vattenfall and Volvo Cars, has inspired a growing number of people to choose products that help them lead a climate-smart lifestyle. One example of these active choices is the Jogensjö family, with dad Jon, mum Tina and son Nils, who are now enjoying a comfortable, low-carbon lifestyle in the house that was at the heart of the One Tonne Life project.

"We've always believed in respecting the environment in our day-to-day lives. But we've still been pleasantly surprised by how easy and comfortable a climate-smart life is if you combine your environmental commitment with the latest technology," says Tina Jogensjö, who works as a creative producer at Unicef.

One Tonne Life gained a lot of media and public attention in 2010 and 2011. The project involved the cooperation of A-hus, Vattenfall and Volvo Cars, together with partners ICA and Siemens, to create a climate-smart life for the Lindell family (with dad Nils, mum Alicja and children Hannah and Jonathan). The test period saw the Lindells cut their emissions from their normal 7.3 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year per person to 1.5 tonnes.

"We were interested and followed the One Tonne Life project through the media. The 80 per cent reduction in the Lindell family's carbon emissions showed that it's possible to make a real difference given the right motivation, know-how and technology. We estimate that we generate around half the carbon dioxide of an average Swedish family, but without compromising on our quality of life," says Tina Jogensjö.

Love at first sight
The Jogensjö family immediately fell in love with the house's stylish design, space and its light interior. The family have been focussing on leading an energy-efficient lifestyle since leaving their apartment in central Stockholm for the 155 square metre One Tonne Life house, which was developed by A-hus and designed by Gert Wingårdh.

"We're able to live a completely normal suburban life, but the bonus is that we live in Sweden's most climate-smart house," says Tina.

Vattenfall's web-based EnergyWatch electricity metre and the company's Smart Plug sockets provide the family with control over their electricity consumption. And surplus electricity generated by the house's 95 square metres of solar panels on the facade and roof is sold to the family's electricity provider.

"The house is already outstandingly energy-efficient. But being able to measure electricity consumption in real time gives us an additional incentive to find areas where we can save a bit more. For example, we've discovered that Jon, who's the one usually nagging me and Nils, showers for far too long," laughs Tina Jogensjö. "Luckily we've also got solar thermal collectors on the garage roof, which provide hot water."

Family trips powered by home-generated solar electricity
The family have been testing out a Volvo V60 Plug-in Hybrid, which they charge on their driveway using Vattenfall's specially designed charging station. Tina Jogensjö travels to work at Unicef in central Stockholm by electric bike, but the plug-in hybrid has made it easy to visit friends and family on weekends.

"Being able to drive a comfortable and spacious family car powered by solar electricity generated at home is very cool. The range of up to 50 kilometres means I can easily drive a 40 kilometres round trip to central Stockholm without the diesel engine kicking in. And plugging the car in at home is easier than driving to a petrol station," says Tina.

"I like to try to go a little further in pure electric mode each time I drive the car. And it also means my driving style is a little more calm and efficient," says Jon.

A-hus – a leader in climate-smart homes
For the project's founders, A-hus, Vattenfall and Volvo Cars, the experience from One Tonne Life has provided further inspiration and motivation to develop new products. A-hus is a leader in developing climate-smart homes with a focus on design and comfort.

"Our houses are more energy-efficient than current energy standards, no matter if they have a modern or traditional design. One Tonne Life is helping us take the next steps in our development of energy-efficient homes and to increase knowledge about climate-smart living," says Susanne Ström, Marketing Director at A-hus.

Vattenfall – smart solutions for lower energy costs
Based on initiatives such as the One Tonne Life project, Vattenfall has developed a range of new products and solutions for energy-efficient living and a sustainable lifestyle.

"It's now easy for a lot of households to significantly cut their energy costs and environmental impact by actively monitoring their electricity consumption, using more energy-efficient appliances and changing behaviour. We're helping the development of electrically powered transport by providing simple charging solutions for both the home and public infrastructure," says Lars Ejeklint, Energy Expert at Vattenfall.

Volvo Cars – success for ground-breaking plug-in hybrid
The One Tonne Life "test family", the Lindells, drove a Volvo C30 Electric, the second generation of which was developed together with Siemens, Volvo Cars' long-term electric cars partner. The project demonstrated that driving an electric car could cut transport-based carbon emissions by 90 per cent.

The Jogensjö family's test car, a Volvo V60 Plug-in Hybrid, which has been developed together with Vattenfall, was one of Europe's best-selling plug-in hybrids in 2013. Later in 2014 the all-new XC90 will also be launched with plug-in hybrid version available.

"Electric cars are a mode of transport that is part of a sustainable society. The plug-in hybrid's smart combination of an efficient internal combustion engine and an electric motor is our most technically advanced driveline ever. This brings us closer to the goal of offering completely emissions-free driving in the future," says Peter Mertens, Senior Vice President, Research and Development at Volvo Cars.

Find out more about One Tonne Life at www.onetonnelife.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      CoolWaters
      • 9 Months Ago
      Can't Volvo come to America and build Houses Too?
      CoolWaters
      • 9 Months Ago
      That's a beautiful car. Why is Europe 10x ahead of the US, Always?
      Warren
      • 9 Months Ago
      Wait! The Lindells were already living a lavish suburban lifestyle, so their move made some sense. But this family was living in an apartment in the city, with no need for a car, and they moved them out to the suburbs to drive a hybrid. :-(
        CoolWaters
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Warren
        As many families do to actually raise a family. But, now many are retiring by moving back into the city.
          Warren
          • 9 Months Ago
          @CoolWaters
          I'd love to sell my place, and move into the city. Know anybody buying a house except near a few megacities?
      Ryan
      • 9 Months Ago
      That is my plan. It should be everyone else's too. A lot of the problems and those who are using their dirty money to spread lies and buy politicians would go away too.
        fairfireman21
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Ryan
        Because it is your plan why should it be everyone else's? I have evaluated solar for my home to getaway with no power bills, but have found several major problems. 1. all the mature trees that shade my house in the summer would inhibit solar production. Topping or cutting down said trees would not be allowed by the city and would make the house hotter in the summer. 2. Cost. It would take 20 years to see any return. 3. Costly inverters. 4. Weather. The sun has been out for about 6 hours for the last week. Other wise it has been overcast. I found that for about $3000 I could install a wind turbine that would take less than 3 years to get a return on, and if not for the city I would have one. Storage is not a problem, most people do not think about this but you can store power on the grid. When power is stored on the grid the power company pays a premium for it being green energy turning your meter backwards, so then when you need power from it the meter turns forward having you pay a cheaper price which if you do not use more than you store a refund from the power company.
          fairfireman21
          • 9 Months Ago
          @fairfireman21
          Can not grow trees on East and West sides would not matter anyway, my house is about 20 feet from either neigbor. I alredy have 2 large trees to the north 1 maple and 1 oak. If I grew any more then my yard would be useless. Also to the North I only have 2 windows where as to the Soouth I have 4 so more heat would enter in the summer making the cooling bill to increase, causing me to use more power. In the winter I do get heat in the south side because of the trees loosing their leaves. Overcast skies still produce power but at a very low rate. The highest efficiant cells I have found only rank at 18%, and they are brand new. I did resurch on the prices and sizes of panels and that was the best I could find. "That is all home repair", that I know I am a Handyman part time with my own business. Like I said I would go wind but the city will not let me put up a tower with one on it.
          CoolWaters
          • 9 Months Ago
          @fairfireman21
          - Grow trees on the North East and West sides of your house. - It should only take 8 years to get your return. Check out better solar panels with higher efficiency. Also, you can't go with the first estimate, of course, it usually takes 3 estimates to finally get an honest proposal. That's all home repair. - Overcast sky's still produce power. - Go Wind!
        Warren
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Ryan
        Please give us more details. I would love to know reducing energy use will reduce millennia of political corruption. Even if we were able to halve our energy use, as stopping the worst of climate change would require, we would still be using double what we used in the 1890's. And I don't recall politics being fairer then.
          Ryan
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Warren
          It was only about a century and a half of corruption. What else came about at that time... When people have a vested interest in maintaining our dirty energy use and either get former employees to run for office or buy off the candidates, it is pretty obvious the only way to win is to not give them money and build efficient buildings/EVs that are powered locally.