Remember when Hollywood stars Diane Kruger (Inglourious Basterds) and Joshua Jackson (Fringe) took a Mercedes-Benz B-Class F-Cell into Death Valley and "survived" by drinking water from the car's tailpipe? Honda has taken that idea into movie theaters in Australia. The idea, but not fuel cell water itself.

Honda H2O logoHonda has created a bottled water brande called H2O, and it's meant to promote the hydrogen-powered Honda FCX Clarity as part of Honda's "clever thinking" campaign. The headline message, just as it was for Mercedes, is that a hydrogen fuel cell car emits nothing but water vapor, which is actually safe to drink. To give movie fans a hands-on experience, Honda Australia filled a number of Palace Cinemas movie theaters with free disposable bottles of H2O water. Of course, since there are only a handful of FCX Clarity vehicles in the world today and it would take a lot of driving to fill up that many bottles, Honda admits that, "if you're holding a bottle of our specially produced H2O water in your hand right now, you've been drinking plain old spring water. If you want to taste the real thing, you'll have to travel to California, Japan or the UK where the FCX is currently available."

Of course, why anyone would want to associate themselves with the unending waste that is bottle water, a product that has not proven itself to be any better than good tap water, is beyond us. But that's what Honda is doing, as you can see in the promotional video about the stunt below.



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  • 22 Comments
      Anonymous Coward
      • 7 Months Ago
      bottled water is so environmentally unfriendly - just like hydrogen compared to an EV.
      krona2k
      • 7 Months Ago
      I don't think they are available on the UK, there's no indication of availability on the Honda UK website. There may have been a handful over here at some point and maybe there still are a few. On the other hand I saw my first BMW i3 on the road yesterday, in line with my prediction that I would see one by the end of May.
      Spec
      • 7 Months Ago
      I wonder if Toyota and Honda's fuel cell fixation is partly due to Japan's energy situation. They have very little local energy resources so they import a lot of energy. And with Fukushima, their electrical generation has taken a hit. Their electricity is expensive since it is now largely generated with imported coal & natural gas. But . . . they've got a research project to harvest methane hydrates. Those can be converted to hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles. Perhaps that is the dream driving their fixation of fuel cell cars? I think they would be better off investing a lot into offshore wind, solar PV, onshore wind, hydropower, geothermal, and restarting their safer nukes.
      Spec
      • 7 Months Ago
      Wanna impress me Honda? Offer a fuel cell car for SALE. (Not lease.)
      Spec
      • 7 Months Ago
      98% of the hydrogen we get is from natural gas. And how do we get natural gas these days? By fracking. And fracking is so good for the water supplies, isn't it? Kinda ironic for them to use water to advertise their fracked natural gas mobile.
      SteveG
      • 7 Months Ago
      Will they also be releasing a brand of Dry Ice named CO2? You know to inform folks about all the CO2 released when natural gas is steam reformed into H2?
      CoolWaters
      • 7 Months Ago
      The Chevy Volt killed the hydrogen car. No one wants it, no one needs it. It does nothing for America, funny Japan isn't pushing this INFERIOR solution on Japan. Is this being funded under the table by Exxon?
        Spec
        • 7 Months Ago
        @CoolWaters
        Yeah, I just can't see how a FCV will be able to challenge the value proposition of the Chevy Volt. The Volt is much cheaper up front, can refuel just as fast (actually faster), can handle most driving with cheap electricity, has refueling stations already installed everywhere, etc.
      electric-car-insider
      • 7 Months Ago
      Good grief. Has it really come to this, Honda?
      Captain Stu
      • 7 Months Ago
      A lot of municipal waters are bad. Bottled water isn't the answer but some city/county water is just bad for you. Get a pitcher filter or a fridge with a filtered dispenser.
      Rick
      • 7 Months Ago
      Yes, it's a marketing gimmick, but technologies need and should be explored. I don't think what we've seen yet is all we will see of hydrogen as a fuel. But go ahead and sit back and cast stones at everything and watch as your world changes around you. Good on Honda.
        Joeviocoe
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Rick
        The world does indeed change around us... and we are part of the change... as we review, buy, drive Electric Cars, and install solar panels on our roofs. Meanwhile, these corporate promises continue to plague the media, convincing people that the 'world is changing' and people don't need to change their own habits... but instead, wait for others to solve the problem and offer a car that operates just like a gasoline car (because people are too lazy to change habits).
          Joeviocoe
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          You keep up with the same nonsense about "potential" of FCVs replacing everything. Meanwhile, EVs/PHEVs ARE, in fact, TODAY replacing more and more. More in 1 year... than your Hydrogen Hype has done in over a decade. You keep fixated on EVs being such a small percentage... yet it is the fastest growing of any alternative. EVs/PHEVs put more power and more options into the hands of the consumers... and that scares the industry, enough to lie about those benefits and hype hydrogen with publicity stunts like this. You seem to think we should give special credence to a technology based on wild promises of 'single handedly replacing more forms fossil fuel transportation'.... but the reality is... there is a lot of diversity that is already better suited. We are NOT going to be a Hydrogen dominate transportation economy. We are going to have a very comprehensive economy. Hydrogen will play a small part in some Heavy Duty niches. The vast majority of light duty will be electric, with gasoline/diesel, playing as diminishing role. CNG/LPG will have larger role than Hydrogen, and biofuels will be included. So.... with all those technologies that work in different niches... and having the same net effect as going with hydrogen... who really cares about the hype and promises of a single fuel to rule them all.
          fairfireman21
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Joeviocoe, I agree with you 100%. You can buy an EV and use it anywhere in the U.S., but Hydrogen on the other hand has how much of a distribution system. You can Plug In at home but you can not compress Hydrogen at home, but have to drive 10s of miles if not hundreds to get to a hydrogen fuel station. Majority of hydrogen is produced from the use of electricity so why not just skip the third process with the secound if you can. The only thing I can see that hydrogen power has over electric power is range. Again which one is winning the race? Electric by decades.
          Marco Polo
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          @ Joeviocoe Your opposition to HFCV's reminds of me of those who always see new technology from a purely personal point of view. You make the mistake of assuming that everyone else in the world shares your personal lifestyle, environment and live in your blessed little acre. Transport technology is a huge, complex global industry. In the same way, global environmental issues can't be solved by small minority actions. So far, EV technology comprises of a tiny percentage of EV passenger (and two wheel) vehicles. The majority of these are small commuter style cars in affluent area's of the world. The impact on the environment is minuscule. With a considerable break through in ESD storage, the best exception of world EV sales over the next 50 years may reach 50 million. Now Joe, that's about the same pollution as emitted by one container ship ! On the other hand, HFCV technology could have the potential over the next 35 years, to replace 40-60 % of the worlds cars, trucks, buses, heavy transport, tractors, agricultural vehicles, even shipping ! The beneficial effect on the environment would be immense ! Thousands of times greater than current EV technology could even dream of achieving.
      Joeviocoe
      • 7 Months Ago
      Considering how their last publicity stunt was a lie... *they did not show the hydrogen carrying support truck needed for their trip to the desert*... This is also just a bad PR stunt. The water in the bottles is not from the exhaust of fuel cells... just plain bottled water. Hydrogen lobbyists are getting desperate again... focusing on gimmicks, because the two only advantages that an FCV has over the competition, is short refuel time, and longer range. PHEVs eliminate those advantages, so they are trying to sell the tailpipe as 'good for the environment'. Nobody is going to be drinking this water... we could save more water for drinking by NOT producing H2 for vehicles. And nobody cares about this gimmick. EVs/PHEVs are dominating the new automotive markets, and FCVs are now struggling to make an image... resorting to the dumbest stunts.
      • 7 Months Ago
      Bottled water is about as promising, valuable, and sustainable as hydrogen-powered vehicles.
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