Okay, okay, okay, so I was just a smidge wrong. Those that read my review of the Ford Fiesta with the new 1.0-liter, EcoBoost engine will know that while I really enjoyed the torquey little three-cylinder, I was concerned that Ford's decision to force 1.0-liter owners into a manual transmission, steel wheels and one trim level might hurt sales of the new engine. I was also concerned that the promised 45-mile-per-gallon highway rating wouldn't be enough to tempt buyers into trying an engine that's so far outside of what the general public is use to. My concerns, though, seem to have been for naught.

While not doing a booming business on the triple-equipped Fiesta, Ford is seeing a take rate of four to eight percent per month in the engine's first few months on sale. Now, four to eight percent might not sound like a lot – if, like last year, the Fiesta sells around 71,000 units, there'd be barely 5,600 1.0-liter models on the road. It is also small potatoes relative to the take rate on EcoBoost-equipped vehicles across the Ford range, which US sales analyst Erich Merkle estimates to be roughly 35 to 40 percent of retail sales. Still, according to The Detroit News, the 1.0-liter is getting adopted at roughly the same rate as the sparkling Fiesta ST, which should be a solid indication of just how well this little engine is doing.

The 1.0-liter's success "really speaks volumes, not just to what we're doing with the Fiesta, but with EcoBoost in general," Merkle told Autoblog.

The biggest issue that Ford seems to be facing in regards to the 1.0-liter is a supply issue – engines just can't be built quickly enough. Production at the Cologne, Germany factory where the triple is built was doubled to 1,000 engines per day last year, in the face of growing European demand. Despite this, widespread availability in the US is still rather far off. And it's only going to get more difficult to snap up a 1.0-liter Fiesta, as Ford will begin offering the tiny engine in the Focus later this year. Customers that have purchased the triple – around 1,000 people, a third of whom are from California, according to The Detroit News – have had to custom order their vehicles.

Provided Ford can really ramp up production and come to grips with its supply issues, the future looks bright for its newest EcoBoost engine.


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  • 30 Comments
      car-a-holic
      • 7 Months Ago
      I can't speak for everyone, but there is a easy simple pleasure from non overly contented and bloated priced vehicles. Way to much nonsense these days. I still like knobs. Not too many buttons. Non wallet busting prices....... Despite being able to afford more. Yes Wierd I know....
        mylexicon
        • 7 Months Ago
        @car-a-holic
        It was more weird when car buyers thought they would be happy if they paid too much for superfluous options and chrome trim pieces. Zen is decontented trim and a manual transmission. Form follows function. Subaru has it right, and they are selling like hotcakes.
      spa2nky1
      • 7 Months Ago
      But I vowed to never buy steelies with wheelcovers ever again!
        BG
        • 7 Months Ago
        @spa2nky1
        Why? On a car like this, tell me one thing that is wrong or inferior about steel wheels (don't worry about the unsprung weight for this type of car).
        BG
        • 7 Months Ago
        @spa2nky1
        Why? On a car like this, tell me one thing that is wrong or inferior about steel wheels (don't worry about the unsprung weight for this type of car).
        PTC DAWG
        • 7 Months Ago
        @spa2nky1
        They sell nice wherls
      Hazdaz
      • 7 Months Ago
      So once again, these myths perpetuated by old-school Detroit executives have been proven wrong. Just like when they say that Americans don't like hatches and don't like small cars and manual transmissions. Consumers can only buy cars that are on sale. If you don't offer them a product, they can't buy it. When it comes to stuff like engine tech, most buyers don't give a crap what is under the hood, as long as the car has a certain amount of pep, and whatever power loss they have to live with gains them something else, be it increased mileage or a reduced price.
      Johnny Trailerpark
      • 7 Months Ago
      THANKS OBAMA.
      Andrew
      • 7 Months Ago
      Morons the best small car is the Spark by far and it doesn't have an EGOBoost with inflated numbers
        xxmixedxtapexx
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Andrew
        Wow you must be jealous if you have to come here and insult another car because of good sales. Very mature good sir, very mature
        Andrew
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Andrew
        It is slapped an Aston grill on a turd doesn't make it nice its till a turd
        Jj008
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Andrew
        I’ve never understood that people that treat the automotive world like they would sports. They are just going to root for their “team” blindly with no thought of their own. They Just need to see a badge to know if they like a car or not. I like good cars, and good cars can come from pretty much any manufacturer. Conversely, bad cars can come from any manufacturer (remember, the same people brought us the Mirage and the Evo). I have owned many cars representing pretty much all of the major manufactures. Team loyalty is great in sports, but misplaced in cars. Is the Fiesta the best small car on the market? There is room for debate on that one, but I can’t imagine any serious enthusiast who knows more then what badge it wears could seriously argue that the Spark is better than the Fiesta. Nevermind that really it's the Sonic that better aligns with the Fiesta in size and price.
      doctrsnoop
      • 7 Months Ago
      Idiotic choice to restrict availability to the low-end trim if such a constrained product. Should have made it only Titanium, and more profit for Ford.
        SquareFour
        • 7 Months Ago
        @doctrsnoop
        Not for me. This is exactly how I'd order a Fiesta: 1.0 EcoBoost, manual trans, steelies. Unnecessary features are overrated anyway, especially on small cars. They just don't add enough to the resale value to offset the added cost. Besides, I'd never spend 18-19K on any subcompact (except maybe the Fiesta ST, but probably not even then). Might as well just step up to a Focus.
      2 wheeled menace
      • 7 Months Ago
      Hey, it's cheaper than a Prius C, probably a bit faster, gets 1mpg less highway, and is quite a bit more exciting to drive ( i test drove a prius C and it is rather sluggish.. ) This car is definitely under appreciated, but i think that if Ford pushed it a little harder, it'd be a total hit.
      JayP
      • 7 Months Ago
      Great news. More little turbo hatches in the used car market in a few years. Imagine this car with a little boost, tighter suspension and wider tires.
      NY EVO X MR GUY
      • 7 Months Ago
      I'm worried about the engine overheating with such a small engine pulling that weight.
      bubba_roe
      • 7 Months Ago
      Ugly little turd isnt it.
      BodyBlue
      • 7 Months Ago
      "Okay, okay, okay, so I was just a smidge wrong." What else is new?
      SethG
      • 7 Months Ago
      I doubt that Ford will be happy if the take rate on the 1.0 matches that of the Fiesta ST. The 1.0 may be unconventional but it's targeted right at the heart of the compact market. The ST, on the other hand, is a performance-oriented model targeted at a niche market. I would imagine that the 1.0 picks up steam when the supply constraints are addressed and awareness continues to grow. At that point I'm sure Ford expects it to far surpass the ST's sales numbers.
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