Have General Motors' hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles emitted enough water vapor over the past six-plus years to equal the steam coming out of Old Faithful? Not exactly, but GM has released a few figures related to the Project Driveway initiative it began in 2007. The numbers are impressive, if not quite of the geyser-spouting variety.

In all, the General converted 119 Chevrolet Equinox SUVs to run on hydrogen, and those vehicles have just collectively surpassed the 3 million mile mark. And if you were waiting for us to tell you that the distance equals a half-dozen round trips between the earth and the moon, well, there you go. The better news is that the SUVs have combined to save almost 158,000 gallons worth of gas, and some of the vehicles have more than 120,000 miles on them. More than 5,000 drivers have participated in the project.

GM reached that landmark about 10 months after it announced that it was working with Honda to accelerate the development of hydrogen fuel-cell powertrain technology. The two companies estimated last summer that it may have something to sell to the public as soon as 2020. For now, you can check out General Motors' press release below.
Show full PR text
GM Fuel Cell Fleet Tops 3 Million Miles

Chevrolet Equinox fuel cell vehicles driven in real world reach milestone

DETROIT – General Motors' fleet of fuel cell vehicles recently passed 3 million miles of hydrogen-powered, real-world driving. Some individual vehicles have accumulated more than 120,000 miles. By GM's estimate, using hydrogen to power these vehicles, the fleet has avoided 157,894 gallons of gasoline consumption.

This specially equipped fleet of Chevrolet Equinox Fuel Cell vehicles are part of GM's 119-vehicle Project Driveway program, which launched in 2007. Since then, more than 5,000 drivers have provided feedback on the functionality and drivability of fuel cell technology.

"Hydrogen fuel cell technology is an important part of GM's advanced propulsion portfolio and we continue to make substantial progress in furthering this technology," said Charlie Freese, executive director of GM's global fuel cell engineering activities. "These vehicles have operated through seven full winters and a wide range of environmental conditions, proving that fuel cells can meet the demands of real-world drivers."

Last year, GM announced two fuel cell-related collaborations. In July, 2013, GM and Honda announced a long-term collaboration to co-develop next-generation fuel cell and hydrogen storage systems, aiming for potential commercialization in the 2020 time frame. In addition, GM and Honda are working together with stakeholders to further advance refueling infrastructure, which is critical for the long-term viability and consumer acceptance of fuel cell vehicles.

Also last year GM opened a new state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development Laboratory at GM Powertrain World Headquarters in Pontiac, Mich. In September, 2013 GM and the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development & Engineering Center (TARDEC) jointly announced an expansion of their relationship for testing automotive fuel cell technology.

GM is an acknowledged leader in fuel cell technology. According to The Clean Energy Patent Growth Index, GM ranked No. 1 in total fuel cell patents granted in 2013, and continues to lead all companies in total fuel cell patents granted since 2002.

General Motors Co. (NYSE:GM, TSX: GMM) and its partners produce vehicles in 30 countries, and the company has leadership positions in the world's largest and fastest-growing automotive markets. GM, its subsidiaries and joint venture entities sell vehicles under the Chevrolet, Cadillac, Baojun, Buick, GMC, Holden, Jiefang, Opel, Vauxhall and Wuling brands. More information on the company and its subsidiaries, including OnStar, a global leader in vehicle safety, security and information services, can be found at http://www.gm.com
Show full PR text
GM Fuel Cell Fleet Tops 3 Million Miles

Chevrolet Equinox fuel cell vehicles driven in real world reach milestone

DETROIT – General Motors' fleet of fuel cell vehicles recently passed 3 million miles of hydrogen-powered, real-world driving. Some individual vehicles have accumulated more than 120,000 miles. By GM's estimate, using hydrogen to power these vehicles, the fleet has avoided 157,894 gallons of gasoline consumption.

This specially equipped fleet of Chevrolet Equinox Fuel Cell vehicles are part of GM's 119-vehicle Project Driveway program, which launched in 2007. Since then, more than 5,000 drivers have provided feedback on the functionality and drivability of fuel cell technology.

"Hydrogen fuel cell technology is an important part of GM's advanced propulsion portfolio and we continue to make substantial progress in furthering this technology," said Charlie Freese, executive director of GM's global fuel cell engineering activities. "These vehicles have operated through seven full winters and a wide range of environmental conditions, proving that fuel cells can meet the demands of real-world drivers."

Last year, GM announced two fuel cell-related collaborations. In July, 2013, GM and Honda announced a long-term collaboration to co-develop next-generation fuel cell and hydrogen storage systems, aiming for potential commercialization in the 2020 time frame. In addition, GM and Honda are working together with stakeholders to further advance refueling infrastructure, which is critical for the long-term viability and consumer acceptance of fuel cell vehicles.

Also last year GM opened a new state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development Laboratory at GM Powertrain World Headquarters in Pontiac, Mich. In September, 2013 GM and the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development & Engineering Center (TARDEC) jointly announced an expansion of their relationship for testing automotive fuel cell technology.

GM is an acknowledged leader in fuel cell technology. According to The Clean Energy Patent Growth Index, GM ranked No. 1 in total fuel cell patents granted in 2013, and continues to lead all companies in total fuel cell patents granted since 2002.

General Motors Co. (NYSE:GM, TSX: GMM) and its partners produce vehicles in 30 countries, and the company has leadership positions in the world's largest and fastest-growing automotive markets. GM, its subsidiaries and joint venture entities sell vehicles under the Chevrolet, Cadillac, Baojun, Buick, GMC, Holden, Jiefang, Opel, Vauxhall and Wuling brands. More information on the company and its subsidiaries, including OnStar, a global leader in vehicle safety, security and information services, can be found at http://www.gm.com


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 44 Comments
      danfred311
      • 2 Months Ago
      I'm convinced
      • 2 Months Ago
      Yes, the mileage is less, but the refueling time is similar to filling a propane tank.... not long. The best chargers take a minimum of 30 minutes to recharge the BEV's.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 2 Months Ago
      "FCEV's also have less range than the best EV's." Care to post some evidence to support your point? Most HFCV sedans we see being put into production over the next few years will get around 300 miles range. A current Toyota FCHV-adv has a range well in excess of 400 miles. http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1089484_toyota-fcv-hydrogen-fuel-cell-test-cars-concept-shown-at-ces "That prototype, the company said, has delivered 300 miles of range consistently from a full tank of hydrogen." http://www.nrel.gov/hydrogen/pdfs/toyota_fchv-adv_range_verification.pdf " Data was logged by Toyota and analyzed by NREL. The maximum range of the FCHV‐adv vehicles was calculated to be 431 miles under these driving conditions. This distance was calculated from the actual range of 331.5 miles during over 11 hours driving, plus 99.5 miles of additional range calculated from the average fuel economy from the day times the remaining usable hydrogen. Driving range results were independently calculated for each vehicle, and these results averaged together to achieve the final 431‐mile range estimate. " What EV are you thinking of when you suggest that they have a range greater than 300-400 miles?
      Hal
      • 2 Months Ago
      It is a miracle there have been no explosions yet.
        Dave
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Hal
        An explosion occurs when there is a compressed mixture of a fuel and oxygen. Since there is no compressed oxygen, why would you expect an explosion?
          Spec
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Dave
          A leak which then creates a trapped cloud of H2 can definitely explode. Take a look at Fukushima. And there have been H2 station explosions. But I don't view this issue to be a significant safety problem for FCVs.
      Actionable Mango
      • 2 Months Ago
      You can always skip Danny King's nonsensical first sentences. "Have General Motors' hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles emitted enough water vapor over the past six-plus years to equal the steam coming out of Old Faithful? Not exactly"
      Letstakeawalk
      • 2 Months Ago
      Cal State opened their new hydrogen station last week. http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1091968_another-hydrogen-fueling-station-opens-in-la-with-fuel-cell-cars-on-the-way https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHHfF6syRWg
        AlphaEdge
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        From your link: "Six stations will use completely renewable energy to generate the fuel."
          Grendal
          • 2 Months Ago
          @AlphaEdge
          Not to be too snarky, but the Hydrogen is reusable?
      Spec
      • 2 Months Ago
      It is 2014 and we are still getting 'test fleet' stories? Sh!t or get off the pot.
        Dave
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Spec
        BEVs took decades. Flat screen TVs took decades. Personal computers took decades. They'll be ready when they are ready.
        Dave
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Spec
        Of course ABG does have a habit of reporting / repeating non-stories.
        Joeviocoe
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Spec
        The important thing to ask is why something is taking "decades", instead of "years". BEVs only took, "years" once Li-ion battery prices were forced out of the stratosphere, and down to a reasonable level by the laptop/mobile industry. Both Musk and Ghosn talked about "forcing factors" setting conditions for the EV emergence. Equally, we must understand WHY something takes decades and still never actually happens. Lead Acid EVs, Flying Cars, American Bullet Trains. Economics of a particular barrier. Whether it be energy economics, or infrastructure economics. There is no predictive power in guessing whether a technology viable, based on how long people have been working on it. There is predictive power in understanding as many of the pieces as possible.
          gpmp
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Again, Alpha: Batteries
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Lead acid battery cars have as much in common with today's Li-Ion BEVs... as donkey riding had with horse and carriage.
          AlphaEdge
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Yeah right, the first electric vehicles are over a hundred years old, and only became viable in the last few years. How could you ignore that? Oh I know, your obsessive compulsive pro-EV/anti-hydrogen behavior.
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Lead acid battery cars have as much in common with today's Li-Ion BEVs... as donkey riding had with horse and carriage.
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Lead acid battery cars have as much in common with today's Li-Ion BEVs... as donkey riding had with horse and carriage.
      ssdajoker
      • 2 Months Ago
      This would be nice, but the infrastructure is not there yet. We need tens of billions of dollars invested in the infrastructure before hydrogen cars become mainstream. Electric cars are the way forward for now.
      Joeviocoe
      • 2 Months Ago
      And Tesla's Superchargers alone: 14,273,033 miles (as of April 2014)
      krona2k
      • 2 Months Ago
      So what? Tesla card alone drive more than 17 million miles *A MONTH* according to this: http://www.teslamotors.com/fr_CA/forum/forums/does-anyone-know-total-miles-driven-all-model-s
      • 2 Months Ago
      So, what's the next step, GM? Are you going to park them all in the desert and then crush them?
      • 2 Months Ago
      Ask GM about the hydrogen? How is it produced? What you will learn is that the hydrogen atoms come from the molecule CH4. Do you know what CH4 is also called? Methane... the main gas in natural gas. Guess what happens when the carbon atom is separated from the hydrogen atoms? It becomes CO and CO2. So how is this saving the environment? It doesn't, but it sure made you feel good until you found out the truth. Yes, you can separate hydrogen from H2O (water), but the energy is equal to energy that is produced when hydrogen and water recombine. This process is expensive and inefficient.
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