Tesla Motors has famously said it will produce and sell a more affordable all-electric car to help further its goal of changing the gasoline-powered paradigm. While there are certain things we know about that vehicle already – it will come standard with a battery capable of a 200-mile range, cost about $35,000 and be around 20 percent smaller than the Model S – there are some things we don't know. For instance, what it will be called.

The automaker seemed to be leaning towards "Model E" and had trademarked that name. CEO Elon Musk even referred to the future vehicle by that appellation during a relatively recent public appearance in Europe. If you had been looking forward to the prospect of driving something called a Tesla Model E, however, you may need to adjust your expectations. During a perusal of the California company's various trademarks, we noticed that this particular one has been abandoned.

While this rather sadly destroys the possibility of someone ever stocking their garage with Tesla Models S, E, and X, we welcome the decision. Although it might seem a logical choice, as the word electric begins with "E", the letter just doesn't resonate particularly well. The move also raises the possibility of a different type of nomenclature altogether.

For its part, Tesla has confirmed with us that it is "no longer pursuing the Model E trademark." Name-wise, we suspect there is a good chance one has already been decided on and that it will be revealed sometime before the cloth is pulled from the first prototype early next year. Still,if you think you have a good suggestion for them, please let us know in Comments.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 48 Comments
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      Such investigative journalism, wow :) I hope that this doesn't mean for broken promises. Maybe they just don't want a Model S, E, X for sale all at the same time, lol...
        Grendal
        • 1 Year Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        And don't forget they also trademarked Model Y too: S. E. X. Y. Nothing wrong with that.
          Domenick
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          The Y, according to Elon at least, was trademarked in jest. http://youtu.be/MBItc_QAUUM?t=38m27s
          2 wheeled menace
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Grendal
          I suppose that Tesla won't be bringing sexy back. Shame.
      Anderlan
      • 1 Year Ago
      Not only Electric. Economy. Excellent. Easy. Elon. How much more perfect do they want a name to be?!? I CAN'T DEAL WITH THIS.
      Mindy Boo
      • 1 Year Ago
      Just as long as he doesn't call it the Model U.
      Cavaron
      • 1 Year Ago
      Call it "Model U", will look great between Model S and X :)
      Joeviocoe
      • 7 Months Ago
      Still, we would not want people thinking it is powered by an Ethanol blend.
      • 1 Year Ago
      People who have money can afford the Gaz(petrol) for the 8 cylinder Jaguar and buy a car for 100,000$. Why do Elon Musk or some compnaies produce a green for for the rich and make it impossible for an average person to even afford green car. The frist thing Mr Elon should do is to produce a car with 200 mile range for the middle class people and then rpoduce high tech for the rich. I have noticed even Hyundai came with hybrid on their blue drive Sonata and the price tag of 35,000$. All auto companies only think of the rich people first. They have it all wrong a rich man can afford the Petrol he does not need green car. he has enough money for wine women song and petrol.
      offib
      • 1 Year Ago
      I really wished the Model E was set in stone for the affordable 3rd car. Elon knows what sells... It would be Tesla's little inside joke! It's fine to have little jokes and quirks, I can't see a reason why not to call the car the Model E! If it's so, what will it be? Model A, T, I, Z, ... ?
      Grendal
      • 7 Months Ago
      I was using 85 because of the Model S. The Model E would be a different number like Model E65 for the largest pack. Likely the smaller pack would be an Model E50.
      diffrunt
      • 1 Year Ago
      Buick hasn't used ELECTRA in a long time, so maybe if Elon asks nicely-------.
        Joeviocoe
        • 7 Months Ago
        @diffrunt
        ewww.... that is such an 80's name. I think one of the American Gladiators was called that.
      JB
      • 1 Year Ago
      I remember when the Model S was called the White Star and the Model E was the Blue Star. White vs Blue Collar?
        Letstakeawalk
        • 1 Year Ago
        @JB
        It's worth pointing out that the original "White Star" concept was not the least bit like what the Model S turned out to be - they really are two entirely different vehicles. The "White Star" was originally planned to be a plug-in hybrid, based upon a Ford Fusion platform. Thanks in no small part to Henrik Fisker, Elon got so infuriated with the project that he completely abandoned that plan (even after prototypes had been shown to investors!) , and went to a pure BEV of original design. "Sometime in 2006, Tesla, in effort to design the now-delayed (and renamed Model S) four-door WhiteStar hybrid, contracted multiple companies to help with design aesthetics. One such company was Fisker Automotive, a coachbuilder. A deal between the two was settled upon in January 2007, with Tesla planning to use “Designed by Fisker Coachbuild” as a marketing tool. Fisker began work, unaware of Tesla’s desire to make the White Star a PHEV, and pursued other projects..." http://wot.motortrend.com/tesla-vs-fisker-the-epilogue-or-why-tesla-owes-fisker-11-million-3052.html#ixzz30yZ2rI7q "Tesla executives said they decided not to use Mr. Fisker’s design and were starting over on the design for White Star when they discovered that Mr. Fisker was going into competition with them. The design switch caused a three- to six-month delay in production of the car, which is now scheduled to go on sale in 2010, the company said." http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/15/technology/15tesla.html http://www.newmeyeranddillion.com/pdf/Tesla_v._Fisker_Corrected_Final_Award_.PDF
          Letstakeawalk
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          Pretty standard in the auto industry to have a different name for the actual production vehicle, after having referred to the project by a code name. Most car buffs prefer to refer to a car by its project designation (993, 996 for modern 911s; E30, E36, E39 for 3ers) because it is more precise than using the model name.
          Grendal
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          Nice reference info. You've mentioned the details at other times but this is the first time I've seen those quotes. Thanks. So in some minor way we owe the Model S to Fisker pulling his shenanigans (or perceived shenanigans by Elon) with the Karma. Elon needed a new designer and brought in Franz. A few years later we have the Model S...
          Joeviocoe
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          It seems the "... Star" is the name of the project. Not the vehicle.
        dgaetano
        • 1 Year Ago
        @JB
        Given that the Roadster was the Dark Star, I always assumed they were Babylon 5 Star Ship references (although it looks like in the show the ships were Black/White/Blue Stars).
      • 1 Year Ago
      American car makers usually try to create a name that conveys some false feelings. Take the following for instance... Cavalier Cobalt Avenger ... These are all poor quality cars with great names. Marketing overcomes the need for a quality product. I think other car makers take an approach where they put emphasis on the quality of the product, not the marketing. Take BMW and Mercedes for instance. Their models are merely numbers. The cars speak for themselves. Tesla is the first American auto maker where they have a high quality product. Don't dilute it with marketing names - let the car speak for itself.
      Robert Fahey
      • 1 Year Ago
      SE
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