Advanced-powertrain vehicle advocates in California and Maryland can rejoice over a chilled glass of Napa Valley's finest white wine and a heaping plate of Baltimore's best crab cakes. That's because both states will continue to make life a little financially sweeter for plug-in vehicle drivers. It's a short-term fix for California but potentially longer-term for Maryland.

The Golden State, which ran out of funds for its zero-emission and plug-in vehicle incentives earlier this month, has cleared another $25 million to take care of vehicle-rebate applicants through June 30, the end of the state's fiscal year, according to the California Air Resources Board (CARB). California provides a $2,500 incentive for zero-emissions cars and $1,500 for plug-in hybrids.

As for Maryland, on April 7, that state's General Assembly passed a provision (the governor still needs to sign it into law) that extends an electric-vehicle tax credit by three years to June 30, 2017. The law would also boosts the maximum possible plug-in vehicle incentive to $3,000 from $1,000. Additionally, the tax credit for plug-in vehicle recharging stations would increase to $900 for individuals and $5,000 for businesses from the current $400. Read Maryland's details here and check out CARB's statement below.

On the national level, the current maximum tax credit of $7,500 could be increased to $10,000. At least, that's what will happen if Vermont Representative Peter Welch follows through on his plan to propose such an increase and it gets voted into law. Granted, there are a lot of "ifs" and "maybes" involved, but it's something to keep an eye on.
Show full PR text
Success of state's Clean Vehicle Rebate Project prompts increased funding

California Air Resources Board votes to expand waiting list with additional $25 million

SACRAMENTO -

On the heels of another record-breaking month of rebates for the cleanest cars in California, the Air Resources Board today voted to immediately expand the funding and current waiting list for incentive funds that help consumers buy zero-emission and plug-in hybrid vehicles.

The Board's action expanded the current $5 million waiting list, established last month, by an additional $25 million to accommodate expected market growth into the summer. The move is in response to the growing demand for zero-emission and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles over the past two years. Currently, about 3,500 rebates are being processed each month totaling between $6 million and $7 million. March marked another record-setting month with 4,800 rebates totaling $9.8 million.

"Thanks to the Legislature and Governor Brown, California consumers can get up to $2,500 back when they buy an ultra-clean vehicle," said California Air Resources Board Chairman Mary D. Nichols. "These incentives have helped make California the fastest-growing market for zero emission vehicles in North America."

The Clean Vehicle Rebate Project has exceeded all expectations. ARB has issued about $100 million for about 50,000 rebates since the program began in March 2010, and plans to continue supporting the project in the coming years.

Applications are being accepted for rebates while the additional funding for the program is being put in place. Consumers placed on the waiting list will receive their rebates at the end of September. Eligibility criteria and rebate amounts for the current fiscal year (2013-14, which ends June 30) will apply to these rebates.

Under the program, individuals, nonprofits, government entities and businesses can get up to a $2,500 state rebate. That can be combined with an up to $7,500 federal tax credit and other regional incentives.

Funding for the continuation of the program for the coming fiscal year is currently in the governor's proposed budget. That funding will be allocated pending the Legislature's passage of the budget and adoption of the annual CVRP spending plan by the ARB in June.

The Clean Vehicle Rebate Project is administered statewide by the California Center for Sustainable Energy. For more information on the program and which cars and models qualify for rebates, click here.
ARB's mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and considering effects on the economy. The ARB oversees all air pollution control efforts in California to attain and maintain health based air quality standards.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 63 Comments
      SublimeKnight
      • 7 Months Ago
      I agree with BF4ALTF and Car Guy. Come up with a formula that considers EPA range and price of the product. Make it an S curve with the targets of 200mi of range and $30k MSRP. Hit either one in isolation and the incentive is $5k. I think this would put both Nissan and Tesla at around $7.5k with the ability to hit the $10k incentive with their next offerings.
      Cavaron
      • 7 Months Ago
      Great, but now people will wait for the outcome of the 7500 to 10000$ rise with their EV purchase. I wonder how much sales will drop in the next month (and surge after the decision).
      • 7 Months Ago
      I think the federal tax credit should be based on combined epa mileage. $1000 per mpg > 30. 2015 honda fit gets $6,000 2014 ford focus sfe gets $3,000 2014 toyota corolla le eco gets $5,000 all hybrids at 40mpg get $10,000
        JB
        • 7 Months Ago
        40 MPG is not that big a deal anymore. The Honda insight was 49/61 MPG with today's EPA back in 1999. All incentives should go into plug-ins. Plenty of intensives for the oil industry already like trillions of US$ spent on the NAVY protecting oil tankers around IRAN. Build that price into the price of gas and you would not need any intensives. The market would adjust automatically toward cleaner, efficient transportation including transit. FYI, by the way the BMW i3 is 124 MPGe, so that's $84,000 of tax credit.
          fairfireman21
          • 7 Months Ago
          @JB
          JB, If that would happen what do you think would happen to the job rate, crime rate, and all that stuff. What about that single mother of 2 that already works 2 minimum wage jobs to just keep a roof and food. What about the retired people that still need cars but only get $1,000 to $2,000 per month to live on.
          JB
          • 7 Months Ago
          @JB
          Fairfireman21, Not a lot of people use cars to get to work in New York and SF. Fuel prices are much more in other parts of the world, but they get by with smaller more efficient cars, good transit, biking, walling and in general not sprawling out. Driving to work you don't get any oversize and it is a waist of time when you could be working, reading or having fun.
          fairfireman21
          • 7 Months Ago
          @JB
          JB, You did not say get rid of it in LA or NY you just said get rid of it. Yes gas prices are higher elswhere I will not dispute that, and yes they do get around in smaller cars, but is that not happening here in the U.S. Look at all the small cars you see everyday, when 10 even 5 years ago there was truck after truck. I could have lived in a big city but I would not have been able to afford a house, with a yard. About driving to work, now you are saying I am oversized because I drive? Waste of time? How can you work while going to work if your work has nothing to do with sitting behind a screan of some sort? Reading I will say is always a good thing. Having fun well I have fun driving. All the points you just made are invalid.
        Joeviocoe
        • 7 Months Ago
        Too much... there will be hardly any money left.
      RyanC
      • 7 Months Ago
      I really wish that they would re-work the credit to be a rebate. That would definitely help out a lot for people who are buying an EV, and aren't in the 6 figure salary range. I just don't have enough tax burden to be able to take advantage of the full $7500 credit -- let alone a $10k credit!
      danfred311
      • 7 Months Ago
      It's not really state aid we need although at high enough levels it will work. All we need is for the nitwit automakers to price the cars by cost like they do on their other entry cars. It's a simple fact that batteries are nowhere near expensive enough to justify the ridiculous 250% price hike most of the douches give us. A Cruze starts at 17k$, a Volt started at 41. That's one hell of a battery price. The Volt uses LGchem cells. It has a redundant 16kWh which costs 3000$ from LGchem. Add that to a Cruze that's litlte over 20. So how does that end up at 40? because they are stupid and evil and you are gullible sheep who accept it without question. That's why. Once EVs are fairly priced the floodgates will open. And should they do something crazy like engineer it well so it's fast, light and aerodynamic then it will be no contest. Norway would snap to near 100% in a couple of years. Bulk of northern Europe and California would quickly follow. All we are waiting for is for even one of these nitwits (and that includes Tesla) to make a decent EV. Batteries are plenty cheap enough already. The cheaper the better of course but it's not battery cost that's holding us back.
        Spec
        • 7 Months Ago
        @danfred311
        Just stop it Dan. We have a free enterprise system wherein anyone can start a business and offer lower priced cars to steal business. No one has done so. And you are free to do it as well, but apparently no one agrees with you and thus no one will fund you. It is difficult to built cheap electric cars. But they have sure gotten better. It was thought to be impossible just few years back . . . but we now have cars that cost less than $30K with no subsidies at all. That is great progress.
        HVH20
        • 7 Months Ago
        @danfred311
        You are an idiot and love trolling. Just for fun lets take a look at what you said. Redundant 16kWh battery pack? Your saying the Volt has 2 of these 16kWh packs in it? That would be an impressive 32kWh! Good for GM to package that much **** in the transmission tunnel. Where do you get this $3000 number for the cells from LG Chem because I'm pretty sure that they cost quite a bit more than that. I've heard realistic numbers of GM's pack costing just under $10k total including the cells. I bet you $20 my guess is closer than yours. I assume that by fast, light, and aerodynamic you mean you put thundersky LiFePO4 cells in a golf cart and wrapped it in cardboard for aerodynamics? You could do a $3000 battery pack for that all day.
        CeeJayABG
        • 7 Months Ago
        @danfred311
        Please provide documentation that the Volt battery cost is $3000. (The Cleantechnica bogus story about the "spares" price is not true, so don't use that as your basis. Kevin Kelly of GM specifically said those prices are not correct and WOULD NOT provide the actual replacement price.) The use of "I know" or "it's obvious" or various pejorative references to the industry don't count. Oddly, there is not a single global automotive company that has managed to do what you claim is simple. Not any US company, none from Japan, not the Hyundai Group, nobody from Europe. Even the dumpy BYD e6 is a $60k car for 122mi of range (EPA rating, not BYD's 186mi claim). So somehow tens of thousands of automotive engineers backed by tens of $B of investment cannot match the acumen of an unknown guy making angry posts on ABG. So you are the smartest guy IN THE WORLD in EV technology, production methods, and safety certification. I can't believe you aren't globally recognized rather than posting in a relatively narrowly-focused industry blog posting under a fake name.
        jmallx
        • 7 Months Ago
        @danfred311
        The volt doesn't start at 41k, it starts at 34k and can be had for 29.5K at chevynorthridge (Rydell). Add on $800 for shipping and another 2K in taxes and fees and you are at 32.3K out the door. Stop Trolling.
          jmallx
          • 7 Months Ago
          @jmallx
          I stand corrected. The 2011 Volt did start at 41K. However it is confusing to mix past prices and current prices.
          Actionable Mango
          • 7 Months Ago
          @jmallx
          He said "started at $41". That is past tense. The 2011 Volt was indeed priced at $41,000.
      2 wheeled menace
      • 7 Months Ago
      I wonder how many people will just live in the state for a year to get $7,500 off from the state and then leave afterwards.
        Joeviocoe
        • 7 Months Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        Probably none. The cost of living increase and moving expenses would cost more than you could gain.
        Spec
        • 7 Months Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        There is no $7500 state rebate/tax-credit that I am aware of.
        dgaetano
        • 7 Months Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        In what state is the rebate $7,500?
          Nick Kordich
          • 7 Months Ago
          @dgaetano
          Currently, to my knowledge, none. Up until January 1st, Colorado offered up to $7500 off in tax credits, but it's now capped at $6,000. http://www.afdc.energy.gov/laws/law/CO/5246 I assume 2WM misread the article, but taking Colorado as close-enough, part of the point of a tax credit is to lure people into the state. I'd be surprised if anyone moved in for a year then out just to nab the tax credit. I mean, if you're willing to move to Colorado, why leave afterward? If taxes are oppressive once you no longer qualify for the tax credit, why not stay in a lower or no-income tax state in the first place?
        Rotation
        • 7 Months Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        Which state are you referring to? There's no $7500 state incentive here.
      Aaron
      • 7 Months Ago
      The tax credit should be scrapped, and a point-of-sale rebate should be instituted. If they really care about the middle class being able to afford an EV, it should be a rebate. I know of no middle class people who have a tax bill greater than $10,000, or anywhere near that amount.
        Spec
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Aaron
        That is a tough political sell. It is one thing to allow people to keep more of their own money . . . it is quite another to have the government actually subsidizing car purchases.
          fairfireman21
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Spec
          I agree Spec. I do not like the fact that it seams the richer get richer and the poorer get poorer. I can not afford $30,000 for a car and I owed tax money. So I do not make as much as someone that can afford it and I still get hit with a bill not a pat on the back with a check in their hand so got richer while I got poorer.
        karlInSanDiego
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Aaron
        Aaron, It only takes a combined family income (joint filing) in the $52k with no kids, or little higher with kids to reach $10k taxes. What kind of income are you talking about? Two entry level post college jobs will make that, or several years beyond entry level if not degreed. Minimum wage? No, but then we're not talking middle class anymore. Can a single recent grad with an entry level job expect to get the full $10k back? No. But I never considered a $32k car a viable choice for someone in an entry level job. Not being elitist here, but these are still expensive cars, even when compliance cars are being sold at far cheaper than their R&D + production costs. I didn't purchase a new car until I was 30, and I have a college degree.
          fairfireman21
          • 7 Months Ago
          @karlInSanDiego
          My wife and I make more than $52K with 2 kids and we could not live well at all if we lost 10K in taxes per year. Right now we are doing OK but there are times when the money is realy short, and we had to pay in. That's right we had to pay in so we would have got $0.00 back from buying one. Now if you are talking "bring home amount" at $52K then they are making close to or more than $70K per year.
      Grendal
      • 7 Months Ago
      It will make me feel better that I waited to get mine until next year.
        Grendal
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Grendal
        An extra $2500 would be very helpful to prevent my wife from killing me for buying such an expensive car.
          danfred311
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Grendal
          You can buy a used Leaf for 13k$
          Spec
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Grendal
          Pffft. She'll get over it. Once you go electric, you don't want to go back. Who wants to deal with oil changes, dripping oil, smog checks, numerous mechanical problems, filling up with gasoline, etc. I'll deal with liquid fuels on those rare times I need to travel long distances. Other than that, I'm done with liquid fuels.
          fairfireman21
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Grendal
          Spec, No oil drips, no smog checks, no mechanical issues, and 1 oil change per vehicle per year. You said no filling up with gas? No instead you have to fill with Electricity. Whats the differance. I can spend 10-15 min per week filling up. The up side to filling up with gas and not electricity is I do know I would forget to unplug it or forget to plug it in then I would realy hurt the wallet.
      goodoldgorr
      • 7 Months Ago
      I found this article in stocks sites but this time it is positive, http://www.topstockanalysts.com/index.php/2014/04/24/why-youd-be-crazy-not-to-buy-tesla-while-its-on-sale/?utm_source=NL-TopStockAn&utm_medium=EMAIL&U=3143195&utm_campaign=TopStockAnalysts.com_TSA_Digest_5-3-14-sat5/3/2014&utm_content=
        Joeviocoe
        • 7 Months Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        --"I found this article in stocks sites but this time it is positive," remember what I told you.
      elctrNmbliT
      • 7 Months Ago
      I don't think it's a bad idea. I think the current incentives are doing the job though. I do think it's important to keep the incentive cap at 200,000 cars per fleet. It gives the automakers an ultimate time frame to push the envelop to get their fleets ready for prime time. Even the companies that are dragging their feet and producing only compliance cars will eventually realize that they will hit their fleet limit and will need to actually produce a viable product.
      Rotation
      • 7 Months Ago
      Is not the federal tax credit also manufacturer-by-manufacturer, first 100,000 cars per manufacturer or something? Surely that would have to be addressed too.
        Spec
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Rotation
        I think Jake is correct. I think the number is 200K. And I agree that extending the 200K limit to a much larger number would be better than increasing it to $10K.
        JakeY
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Rotation
        I thought it was 200k. I think the way things are going, the "next gen" models (like the Leaf 2.0, Model E, etc) will run into that problem. I do think it would be better to keep the amount the same and just extend the car limit.
          Nick Kordich
          • 7 Months Ago
          @JakeY
          The phaseout kicks in "the second calendar quarter after the calendar quarter" that the 200,000th qualifying vehicle is sold in the US, so the credit actually applies to the first 200,000 cars sold and sales during the grace period. http://www.irs.gov/Businesses/Plug-In-Electric-Vehicle-Credit-(IRC-30-and-IRC-30D)
      goodoldgorr
      • 7 Months Ago
      If they give such big incentive then they should also give some incentive to guy like me that bought a small 4 cylinder car that I keep a long time and that I drive it slow. I don't have a place to plug so it's a proven fact that I bought and maintain the best car available.
        Spec
        • 7 Months Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        Have you done anything to try to get a place to put a plug? Or are you just a quitter?
          fairfireman21
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Spec
          I also would not have a place to plug it in. No garage big enouph to put it in and even if it did fit I would not be able to get it out after just 2 inches of snow, and do not have the money to build a new one.
        goodoldgorr
        • 7 Months Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        I have a dodge neon 2005 that I bought new and still will keep another 10 years and I moved 2 time till then and I will move this summer also. With the kind of trips I do I will be on the side of the road If I have bought a leaf and there were no leaf or volt in 2005. Many crazy folks have leased big f-150 or bmw x5 since that time.
          fairfireman21
          • 7 Months Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          I agree with all this as well. We had to make a 45 mile trip the other night, and with a EV range of even 80 would not have done it. So we used the Cruze and we were getting between 42 and 53 MPG acording to the instant fuel meter. If we would have got another car that was more than the $18,000 we would have had to get an older car that would not get the same MPGs.
        Joeviocoe
        • 7 Months Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        --" they should also give some incentive to guy like me that bought a small 4 cylinder car that I keep a long time and that I drive it slow" What is your car's emissions profile? The emissions of production is less than 15% that of the lifetime emissions of driving it... so it may be better for the environment to buy a newer small car. But it depends on what you are getting now.
          rubley00
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          So now you admit producing a car causes emissions...
          Joeviocoe
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          sigh... I don't have time or energy to go back and quote myself... Yes, always have. But it has always been insignificant compared to the lifetime emissions from driving... so I am always telling people to stop saying that EVs are worse for the environment just because initial production is a bit more energy intensive.
    • Load More Comments