We dig simple solutions to problems. There's something highly gratifying about making a minute change to fix something, rather than tearing up the playbook. That's what GMC has done with the new Canyon midsize pickup.
When putting a car seat in, car seat manufacturers require that at least 80 percent of the seat's base fit on the bottom cushion. That's a big problem in extended-cab pickups like the Canyon, which feature jump seats with shorter bottom cushions, in place of the larger, more traditionally designed bench.

The Canyon gets around this with extendable jump seats - simply pop out the headrest and slot it into the bottom seat cushion, and the truck can now easily accommodate a child's seat.

"It's an elegant solution that makes efficient use of the limited space in the rear seat in this type of vehicle, by allowing us to adapt the seat cushion length for child restraint installation," Eduardo Bugelli, the Canyon's safety performance team lead, said in statement. "The additional seat cushion length provides more support to the child restraint, which helps to reduce the rotation and the risk of injury in a crash."

All in all, it's a pretty darn clever idea to a problem we imagine as being fairly common in the world of pickup trucks. To see the system in action, scroll down and have a look at the video.
Show full PR text
All-New GMC Canyon Brings Safety Firsts to Midsize Trucks
Active safety technologies and patent-pending child restraint safety feature

DETROIT – When the all-new 2015 GMC Canyon launches this fall, it will not only bring a full payload of midsize truck segment-leading capabilities, but segment safety firsts including a patent-pending child safety feature.

Smaller jump seats found in extended cab midsize trucks may have too little lower seat cushion length to meet many child restraint manufacturer's recommendation to have at least 80 percent of the child restraint base fit on the seat cushion. General Motors' engineers have designed a patent-pending solution for the 2015 Canyon extended cab to help keep kids in child restraints safer in a collision.

Using the rear jump seat headrest on the passenger side of the extended-cab Canyon, the jump seat cushion can be extended by removing the head rest and inserting it horizontally into the seat base. This helps the extended-cab Canyon satisfy the seat base recommendation of most child restraint manufacturers.

"It's an elegant solution that makes efficient use of the limited space in the rear seat in this type of vehicle, by allowing us to adapt the seat cushion length for child restraint installation," said Eduardo Bugelli, safety performance team lead. "The additional seat cushion length provides more support to the child restraint, which helps to reduce the rotation and the risk of injury in a crash."

In addition to this patent-pending design, the all-new Canyon will be the first midsize truck to offer Forward Collision Alert and Lane Departure Warning technology as part of the available Driver Alert Package.

Forward collision alert technology helps prevent frontal crashes by alerting the driver when the truck is closing in on a vehicle ahead too quickly, giving the driver additional time to react and avoid a crash.

Lane Departure Warning technology can alert the driver when the truck drifts over a lane line when traveling at least 35 mph.

In a collision, the Canyon's all-new cab structure is made from over 70 percent high-strength steel to better protect its occupants. It also comes standard with six air bags, including head curtain side air bags that can also reduce the risk of occupant ejection.

Safety and convenience technology continues with a standard rear vision camera and available next-generation IntelliLink infotainment system. IntelliLink can seamlessly integrate the capability of a smartphone into the vehicle so that hand-held phones may be safely stowed while driving. Features such as smartphone voice recognition pass through, including text message support and Siri Eyes Free, enable the driver to be alerted to new text messages and have them read aloud and respond, depending on the functionality of the smartphone). Siri Eyes Free enables iPhone 4S and iPhone 5 users to access Siri via the steering wheel controls and check calendar entries, have text messages read and respond to them, place calls or call up music.

Android phone users can also use the steering wheel controls to access their phone's voice recognition features.

The Canyon will be assembled at GM's Wentzville, Mo., assembly plant. GMC will continue to work on and develop the Canyon until the start of production in fall 2014.

About GMC
GMC has manufactured trucks since 1902, with innovation and engineering excellence built into all GMC vehicles. The brand is evolving to offer more fuel-efficient trucks and crossovers, including the Terrain small SUV and Acadia crossover. GMC's highest-volume vehicle, the Sierra pickup, is the most powerful light duty pickup on the market, and the first full-size pickup to receive the highest possible five-star Overall Vehicle Score for safety since the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration changed its New Car Assessment Program for the 2011 model year. Details on all GMC models are available at http://www.gmc.com/, on Twitter at @thisisgmc or at http://www.facebook.com/gmc.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 33 Comments
      Greg
      • 7 Months Ago
      That's a fantastic idea. If these are fold-away jump seats, then it could also be a good place to store the headrests when not in use so they don't impair rearward visibility, too.
      Avinash Machado
      • 7 Months Ago
      Neat trick.
      ocnblu
      • 7 Months Ago
      Being a single guy, and hearing about the extended cab "rear seat delete" option, I hope that is not only for base trucks. I am interested in an extended cab Z71 Colorado, but don't need jump seats taking up in-cab storage room.
        MechE
        • 7 Months Ago
        @ocnblu
        Could take them out and sell them off for a few bucks.
        v6sonoma
        • 7 Months Ago
        @ocnblu
        Exactly. I wouldn't want to torture anyone other than a child by making them sit back there. lol Might as well get rid of the seat all together.
      PiCASSO
      • 7 Months Ago
      Simple and smart....
      ocnblu
      • 7 Months Ago
      This is a smart idea for extended cab buyers. For those who need more cabin room all the time, the crew cab is available. And crew cab buyers have no need to worry about compromised bed space anymore, either, with the full 6 foot bed option.
      MechE
      • 7 Months Ago
      Could be used to torture some adult passengers too
      Joe Marcotte
      • 7 Months Ago
      The can't build an ignition switch, the don't have the right hear impact protection on the gmc Savanah and Chevrolet express, they can't build air bag worrying harness for enclave, traverse and Acadia what the hell makes you think I'm going to trust a child safety device?
        Greg
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Joe Marcotte
        But at least they can use proper grammar, so they have an advantage there,.
        atc98092
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Joe Marcotte
        Besides all the above obvious answers, the child safety device itself isn't a GM product. GM has simply made the seat in the truck compatible with existing safety seats. Try Reading Comprehension 101.
        v6sonoma
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Joe Marcotte
        First learn to spell. Then maybe someone will care about your opinion.
      churchmotor
      • 7 Months Ago
      Yet to save 57 cents, GM will knowingly let people buy and drive their cars with knows defects that could cause you to be in an accident and die.
      hokkaido76
      • 7 Months Ago
      OR........they could just make the rear seats bigger.
        ocnblu
        • 7 Months Ago
        @hokkaido76
        Uh, how are they going to do that in a compact truck extended cab and keep a modicum of legroom?
        montoym
        • 7 Months Ago
        @hokkaido76
        That's why they offer the crew cab as well. The extended cab versions are meant to provide a rear seat option if necessary, not as a daily use sort of thing. Used to be, they didn't offer seats back there at all, just cargo space. Now, most are large enough to allow at least the use of jump seats like these. Good thing is, buyers have a choice of which option they prefer. Despite the limited use of the rear seats in extended cabs (on all trucks, not just these), buyers still buy enough of them to keep the manufacturers building them.
      Gary
      • 7 Months Ago
      And were do the kids leggs go????????
      Nicholas
      • 7 Months Ago
      The car seat is in backwards. At least for Canadian child seat standards. Isn't the American child seat recommendation the same? Neat idea, but I can't see it benefiting a rearward facing seat, if it can even fit there in the first place.
        gary
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Nicholas
        In America, infant seats are rear-facing, but most switch their child from rear- to front-facing somewhere around age 1.
        nova
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Nicholas
        What's pictured appears to be a booster seat designed for older (age 2+) children. Children too big for a traditional car seat but not big enough to just depend on seat belts. We have convertible car seats from Britax that have 3 different setups. Reclined rear facing for infants and smaller babies. Sitting up rear facing for older larger babies. Then sitting up forward facing for when the child hits the 1 year/20lb minimun, although now the recomendation is to keep kids facing rearward as long as possible.
        Sorten Borten
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Nicholas
        Only in the front seat, where airbag impact is a concern
          atc98092
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Sorten Borten
          Child seats never go in the front, unless there is an airbag disable switch. Facing front or rear, never in the front seat. My Ram 1500 has a switch in the dash that uses the ignition switch to disable the air bag. It's the only way to safely use a child seat in the front.
      amge5.5
      • 7 Months Ago
      I wonder if there are any crash test results with this or if they just met the regulation that the car seat had to rest on something. I wonder how well that head rest stays in during a crash? Smart idea if it works and they actually tested it during crashes.
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