The people at the National Corvette Museum are hoping to turn a catastrophe into an opportunity for continued success. Since all eight cars eaten by the 40-foot wide and 60-foot deep sinkhole were removed and put on display, the museum has seen an uptick in visitors to check the wrecked 'Vettes out. According to CNN, attendance was up over 50 percent for March. The next step might be stabilizing the hole and making it a permanent part of the Skydome hall along with some of the most damaged cars.

Several of the eight Corvettes appear to be salvageable as well. The museum's board of directors meets with restorers in May to decide the next step. However, a few of them, like the Mallett Hammer, might be beyond repair. It now looks like little more than a twisted ball of metal and may remain on display in that condition.

The board is also considering what to do about the sinkhole. "There is a possibility of leaving it here. Whether, it's just a portion or all of it, having a bridge over it, stairs that go down in it, a glass floor on top where you can look down," said Katie Frassinelli from the National Corvette Museum to CNN. "We're talking to the construction company and engineers just to see the possibilities." It would definitely be a unique exhibit. Scroll down to watch a video about its future plans.

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