• Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
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  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
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  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
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  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
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  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
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  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
  • Image Credit: Matt Davis
You can add McLaren to the list of luxury and sports car companies to say it will not build an SUV, the automaker's CEO Mike Flewitt telling Bloomberg, "We need to remain very focused. McLaren is a sports car brand and that's exactly what we're going to remain." In spite of those words, in order to save his voice, Flewitt should get business cards made printed with that response, since the question will certainly keep being asked. And if the coming Lamborghini and Bentley SUVs do well, observers will expect Flewitt's ideas on the subject to "evolve," no matter what he or Ron Dennis says publicly.

The evolution we refer to has taken place at BMW, which was never going to make a M version of its SUVs, and Porsche, which said it wouldn't make an SUV smaller than the Cayenne. Furthermore, there's Rolls-Royce, whose CEO said the company hadn't even considered an SUV because it wouldn't fit the brand's values, meanwhile rumors abounded that the company was gauging customer reaction to a sketch of a concept SUV adorned with the Spirit of Ecstasy. And five months later that same CEO said the company was "intesively thinking" about building one. Those are but few and recent examples. If McLaren doesn't waver, it will join Ferrari as the only pure-sports car company holdouts.


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