The Ford Everest Concept SUV at the 2014 Beijing Motor Show shows the future of the Blue Oval's truck line in China. While a concept for now, we're told that JMC, Ford's Chinese joint-venture partner, will build a production version sometime in the near future.

With design from Ford's Asia Pacific design team, the handsome seven-passenger SUV shows off some very muscular styling with wraparound headlights that hook into the contours of the angular trapezoidal grille. The beltline rises up the body in the rear and makes the back appear higher than the front. The rear is made from hard, chiseled contours that give the truck a very tough look. The Everest looks ready for some rough roads.

Ford is keeping the interior and mechanical details about the Everest a secret for now, but the SUV is rumored to share some components with the overseas Ranger pickup. The company has no plans to sell the truck in North America. Scroll down to read the official announcement, including the few details on its production.
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Ford Everest Concept Offers Glimpse of Future Medium Off-Road SUV at Auto China 2014

 Ford Everest Concept shows Ford's vision for a rugged and versatile off-road SUV that would further strengthen its unsurpassed SUV lineup in China

 The concept vehicle is indicative of a vehicle the company's JMC joint venture will produce and distribute through JMC's Ford-brand dealer network

 Created by Ford's Asia Pacific design and engineering team, the Ford Everest Concept represents a new benchmark for modern and robust SUV design

 Tough yet sculpted exterior communicates impressive off-road capabilities combined with premium refinement and advanced technologies


BEIJING, China, April 20, 2014 – Ford is giving consumers in China a glimpse of the future with the unveiling of the Ford Everest Concept at Auto China 2014. The concept for a medium, seven-seat off-road SUV previews Ford's vision for a compelling addition to its unsurpassed offering of SUVs in China. The production version will be produced for the Chinese market by Ford's JMC joint venture and distributed through JMC's Ford-brand network of dealers.

"Around the world, Ford continues to develop and launch global SUVs of all sizes, to meet the growing and dynamic demands of our customers. They play an important role in driving Ford's growth globally and in China," said John Lawler, chairman and CEO, Ford China.

"The Ford Everest Concept shows how we envision cementing our leadership in the SUV segment with a rugged and versatile vehicle that combines stunning design with the promise of incredible off-road capability. We see a strong market in China for a vehicle like the Ford Everest Concept, which would expand and complement our existing world-class family of SUVs."

A strong SUV lineup helped Ford's global utility sales grow 37 percent in 2013 to 1.2 million units, compared with 13 percent growth for the segment overall. In China, Ford's share of the utility market shot up from 0.3 percent in 2012 to 4.5 percent in 2013, with record sales of more than 150,000 vehicles. The Ford Everest Concept previews a vehicle that Ford anticipates would help to extend its SUV leadership and reach a wider range of customers, with unrivalled off-road capability, premium refinement, advanced technologies and Ford's fun-to-drive DNA.

"The SUV market in China grew 49 percent last year, and we see tremendous opportunity in this segment over the coming five years," said Lawler. "With a vehicle like the Ford Everest Concept, we would be furthering our commitment to serving our customers in China."

Created by Ford's Asia Pacific design team in Australia, the Ford Everest Concept features key Ford design cues, starting from a prominent inverted trapezoid grille. Headlamps wrapping around the grille give the Ford Everest Concept a technical, robust look, an appearance that calls to mind interlocking gear cogs. The connected headlamps also communicate functionality while emphasizing the grille, and give the front end a strong and powerful presence that is unmistakably a Ford.

"We drew a lot of inspiration from our Ford design heritage," said David Dewitt, exterior design manager, Ford Asia Pacific. "When we designed the Ford Everest Concept, we looked at how to communicate a sense of sleekness and refinement, and you can see that in the silhouette. The sleekness and sophistication are then punctuated in the details, which are very technical."

Moving back from the upright grille, the headlamps are swept back for a modern and aerodynamic look. The vehicle's profile is sculpted, helping the Ford Everest Concept to stand out from the crowd.

"As tough and capable as we wanted it to be, we also wanted the Ford Everest Concept to be modern and sophisticated," said Dewitt. "So even though it's tough, chunky and robust-looking, it's also sleek, tailored, and much more sculptural than a typical boxy SUV design."

At the back of the vehicle, designers placed prominent, chiseled tail lamps over a negative scallop, making for a sculptural and robust rear that contrasts with the square, flat liftgates on traditional SUVs. Combined with high ground clearance that indicates the vehicle's off-road potential, the distinctive design of the Ford Everest Concept looks bold and purposeful, yet modern and nimble.

Amplifying and reflecting the vehicle's tough physique and impressive capabilities, the Ford Everest Concept is painted in a show-stopping red with a flash of orange, called "Sunset Flare." Bold and powerful, it has a warmth that expresses the vehicle's premium qualities.

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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 45 Comments
      P.Z. Dawkins
      • 8 Months Ago
      I think this would look very nice shortened by two doors and renamed "Bronco," don't you?
      g
      • 8 Months Ago
      Both Ford and Volkswagon are dumb as hell when it comes to what America wants. This truck would sell like hotcakes in nearly every state
        Dean Hammond
        • 8 Months Ago
        @g
        ah yeah....right now the Explorer is leading its segment so why rock the boat with un-necessary change?
          Dean Hammond
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          sorry, but sales proove the point,I would say more so here in the States than anywhere else, and the US just happens to be the worlds biggest market...the prior Explorer WAS BOF, initially there was a lot of grumbling when the decision was made to go Unibody, and sadly the consequence was...class leadership..so critique all you wish, fact is Fords decision ( based on their research ) was the correct one, and its sucessis one any other manufacturer would LOVE to emulate
        A
        • 8 Months Ago
        @g
        Problem is the Explorer is selling like hotcakes in America to two major groups of people out there: Soccer moms and cops (Utility Interceptor).
      Jake
      • 8 Months Ago
      Well, at least in the states we get a Taurus dressed up to look like an SUV. Yeah!
      Anonymous
      • 8 Months Ago
      I had a Ranger T6 on which this is based when I was living in Malaysia and it was amazing. It had REAL 4wd which never let me down in the rural areas of Sarawak. The diesel/6speed combo was phenomenal and would pull down 30 mpg regularly. This is particularly impressive when you consider the type of driving one does there. The back seat was even comfortable for tall adults, I put my 6'2" brother back there on a trip from Kuching to Miri and he never had a complaint. It was dead reliable, fun to drive, great off road, great on fuel, and better than my 2013 f-150 in almost every way and FAR better than the Explorer we have today.
      mumbojumbo
      • 8 Months Ago
      Isn't Alan Mullaly making a big thing about "One Ford", where all the cars Ford makes are sold globally. If so, then when or why don't we get this thing in the USA? This SUV is way more desirable than any of the current SUV's Ford sells in the USA. Sigh.
        Robert Ryan
        • 8 Months Ago
        @mumbojumbo
        More than this is not sold in the US and a Ford Product. So much for "One Ford"
      Apex Surgeon
      • 8 Months Ago
      I'd drive this...
      Bill
      • 8 Months Ago
      Maybe Ford greenlighted this Durango looking design since it knew it was not coming to America. Will this sell more than the Explorer? No. Is it a better SUV? For what SUVs are meant to do, probably yes. The Explorer looks like a tough SUV... but it isn't and it shouldn't still be called an Explorer... it's like selling ash wood as oak wood... but then again... Ford is selling many "Explorers" so it must be the right decision;)
        Dean Hammond
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Bill
        actually Bill, I believe the Explorer is a little tougher than you think...its the darling of the Police Interceptor crowd right now, and i can assure you, anything deemed Interceptor worthy is as tough as they come...
      Brodz
      • 8 Months Ago
      The Asia-Pacific design team are the guys here in Australia. The same talent that brought us the venerable but unloved Falcon.
      Avinash Machado
      • 8 Months Ago
      2015 Bronco?
      sdwalker85
      • 8 Months Ago
      Am I the only one who thinks this looks very simular to a Durango?
        avanti
        • 8 Months Ago
        @sdwalker85
        Fist thought i had was "This looks just like a Durango!" Side profile, headlamp treatment, grill proportion/shape are uncannily similar.
        Middleman
        • 8 Months Ago
        @sdwalker85
        I was starting to think it was just me.
      border411@yahoo.com
      • 8 Months Ago
      Dont even like Fords, and the new Explorer is ho-hum. This thing looks awesome! And no, it doesnt look like a Durango.
      bcsaxman
      • 8 Months Ago
      IMO, this SUV - and it not being available in the USA - is everything wrong with Ford right now. As someone noted below, in every market this vehicle is available in, it positively slays the competition. Diesel power & fuel economy, great 6spd manual and auto, plenty of room, reliable as an anvil, and - Durango similarities be damned - it looks fantastic inside AND out. But not in the Land of the Free. No, there you must hear mealy excuses about FoMoCo not wanting to spend the money federalizing it. Meanwhile, how much money was spent on the new Explorer? It gets worse MPGs & looks like ass. It sells, yes, because it's all you have from Ford in N.A. Does anyone seriously doubt his SUV & the Ranger truck it's based on would sell crazy numbers if offered in the U.S., Canada & Mexico too, had they ever been offered there? Bbbut - God Forbid! - the F-Series should ever lose it's marketing banner of 'Best Selling Truck in Wonderland'. Am I missing something? Is it so hard to call it the "F-50 Ranger"? Is 'Explorer' a badge only to be used on ugly SUVs?? Forgive me for droning, but this is a troubling, recurring trend for Ford in the last few years. With some obvious hits (like Fiesta ST & Mondeo & maybe F-150), they also seem hell-bent on snatching defeat from the jaws of victory. Usual methods are: a] keeping good product out of the hands of half the buying planet (see story above), b] modifying already good product to conform to another half the planet's regular expectations, even though said product in it's iconic state is what attracted them in the first place (i.e. the Europeans and the Mustang), and forcing it down the throats of everybody, or c] being obstinately mediocre in the face of moments when boldness is called for (saving Lincoln from oblivion). And I have no idea where MyFordTouch fits in there, but by Jehovah what a screw up. I keep thinking of Apple Inc. - maybe because Mulally almost jumped ship for their historic competitor Microsoft. At least under Jobs, Apple would never hesitate to risk cannibalizing a pre-existing & profitable product line with a better mousetrap they created (and, generally, it was made sure that it WAS a better mousetrap before it hit the public). If the iPod had to fight it out against another version of itself, or an iPhone, so be it! The consumer was the beneficiary of the best Apple had to offer no matter what. With Ford, more and more it seems we keep getting fed spoonfuls of drek in shiny new bowls and told to pay no attention to the fancy cuisine the guy one table over is eating for the same money. "Why, you have the best cars in the world already! Health care too! KEEP EATING SUCKER …"
        snp
        • 8 Months Ago
        @bcsaxman
        where would this vehicle class fit in exactly? The fact that you said it was based on ranger platform, uses diesel, and competes directly with explorer means it wouldnt be wise to sell it here. IMO, it could only be sold here if it had something unique with broad appeal or is replacing an existing line. It's clearly too small to replace the expedition, and too large to replace edge - it has way less appeal than ford explorer too...It makes sense in foreign markets because they are importing our US made ford explorers so they pay heavy taxes, this is diesel and some countries have extensive use of subsidized diesel, ranger platform is internationally accepted and in use so minimal change. They could've easily given this the same exact look as ford explorer, but share almost none of the parts which kinda goes against "one ford".
          Robert Ryan
          • 8 Months Ago
          @snp
          Very few countries import Explorers and not in Asia, where diesels are preferred.
          border411@yahoo.com
          • 8 Months Ago
          @snp
          Why do cars always have to "Fit into" an established segment? Branch out and make a new one! Couldnt this replace the Expedition (if it "needs" to replace an already existing model"?
          bcsaxman
          • 8 Months Ago
          @snp
          I'll refer to the Apple example I gave as to where it would fit - if it sits right on top of the Explorer, oh well. Let the market decide which is best. As for it not being wise to sell it because of diesel power; I can only assume you haven't seen the introduction of diesel for the Ram 1500 & Promaster, Jeep Grand Cherokee, Nissan Titan, Chevy Colorado/GMC Whatever, & even Ford's new van has a 5cyl 'PowerStroke' that fits right up against their ubiquitous 6spd auto, as well as diesel in practically everything VW, MB, & BMW makes. It's just not a problem anymore man. People in the US actually LIKE diesel now - it's not he 1970s anymore! And btw, diesel is not subsidized in most of the markets this SUV is sold in - diesel is just cheaper to make (yes, even the low sulfur stuff) and thus they sell it cheaper to consumers. Only in 'Murica is it, somehow, a 'boutique fuel'. That's changing - Premium (which I believe all EcoBoosts must have) & Diesel are getting closer in price nationwide - but diesel's MPG advantage now makes up for the extra cost in most cases anyway. Certainly it would in the case of EcoBoost in anything but all highway driving. As for the international Ranger platform, it's brand new. This is not our old Ranger at all. So, for the same big bucks development money, this BoF SUV gets the same MPGs as the gas Unibody Explorer in N.A. does, kills it as a diesel, is roomier in back no matter the version, yet has the same footprint. In other words, it is what the Explorer should be, and what the more knowledgeable customers outside the US demanded of Ford. And Ford delivered … to them. I guess thats what happens when the competition is fierce in a given segment, Trust me, if the Toyota Hilux and all the other mid-size SUVs that are standard fare everywhere else in the world were sold in the USA, the Explorer that the N.A. region was saddled with instead would never have left the conceptual drawing stage. 'One Ford' was easily achievable by simply designing one truck/SUV. I submit that the market where this type of vehicle is popular & has the most competition would have been the most sensible place to make the 'One Ford' SUV, sold everywhere. Instead, as they are want to do, Ford saw an opportunity to complicate the matter unnecessarily. They designed two very different vehicles, which are targeted at essentially the same type of consumer; one was clearly better than the other, but building/selling the better SUV in the place where SUV's rule, where it would have made the most money for them for sure, was considered a losing strategy. They saw the road less sensical and Ford management took it. I guess we should just be thankful the Ford Alliteration Police/'Family Design' Division were apparently out having donuts when all this went down. Otherwise I'd be lusting after the international only "Ford Five-Fifty-Five", with it's Aston-esque "3-Bar Grill" & 'flag-inspired' headlights & taillights . Or something like that.
          Dump
          • 8 Months Ago
          @snp
          these are all very good arguments. unfortunately, there isn't any easy solution that will "make sense" to everybody. Ford does something to satisfy the US - the Asia/European markets balk/laugh & vice-versa. none of us want Ford to ever fail in the industry. we do want to see the automaker actually take a chance on some of the really good designs/concepts on a global scale. For example, GM - though under heavy economic scrutiny - made the Lambda CUVs as an alternative to the GMT-900 BoF trucks. The Lambdas arent massively more efficient but consumers liked a large SUV/CUV option that wasn't just the same Tahoe/Yukon/Suburban offerings - and as it turns out, GM is selling both types of large SUVs very well. Ford's response.....? A new Explorer? No, not big enough. The Expedition? Really? ...the redesign/refresh is cute though.
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