Honda's ASIMO robot is moving into its teenage years, having originally been introduced in 2000, and like all teens, it's still learning. The bot has received regular incremental upgrades over that time, and the latest version will premiere on LIVE with Kelly and Michael on Tuesday, April 15.

The newest enhancements provide ASIMO with improved hand dexterity, the ability to use sign language, run faster, climb stars more smoothly, balance on one foot, jump and more. Honda says other new features will be demonstrated with hosts Kelly Ripa and Michael Strahan on the show.

The ongoing development of ASIMO, which stands for Advanced Step in Innovative Mobility, is being done so that one day it can help humans who require assistance. The current version is 4-feet, 3-inches tall, weighs 110 pounds and is made mostly from magnesium alloy and plastic. A big limit is still its lithium-ion battery that only provides 40 minutes of charge. The robot has not needed human control to move since a previous iteration in 2011, which also improved its manual dexterity. It could even pour drinks.

While you can't stroll into your local Honda dealer and buy an ASIMO (at least not yet), its technology has been adapted to other Honda projects. The Miimo lawnmower trims grass without human assistance, and the Uni-Cub β mobility device is adapted from the robot's balancing and movement tech. Scroll down to read a bit about the new abilities.
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ALL-NEW VERSION OF ASIMO WILL DEBUT IN NORTH AMERICA APRIL 15

Honda will introduce its newest version of ASIMO, the world's most advanced humanoid robot, to U.S. audiences on the popular nationally syndicated talk show "LIVE with Kelly and Michael," on Tuesday, April 15, 2014. The newest version of ASIMO will join hosts Kelly Ripa and Michael Strahan to debut several of its new robotic abilities.

The new version of ASIMO - which stands for Advanced Step in Innovative Mobility - features enhanced hand dexterity, including the ability to sign in both Japanese and American sign language, as well as the ability to run faster than previously, climb stairs more smoothly, hop, jump, balance on one foot, and transition seamlessly between walking and running, among other new and unique capabilities.

"ASIMO was designed to help those in society who need assistance, and Honda believes that these improvements in ASIMO bring us another step closer to our ultimate goal of being able to help all kinds of people in need," said Satoshi Shigemi, Senior Chief Engineer with Honda R&D Co., Ltd. in Japan, responsible for humanoid robotics.

Following the broadcast on "LIVE with Kelly and Michael," ASIMO will demonstrate its new capabilities for national technology and science media in New York.

About ASIMO
Honda introduced the first version of ASIMO, the world's most advanced, bi-pedal humanoid robot, in 2000, after 14 years of research on humanoid robotics. Honda created ASIMO to help people and society, to create a helpmate for humans requiring assistance with their daily lives.

The small, lightweight robot is designed to operate fluidly in a human environment, and is capable of walking, running, climbing and descending stairs, avoiding objects, and recognizing human faces, among other skills.

The new version of ASIMO is 4'3" tall (130 cm), weighs 110 lbs (50 kg), and is made of magnesium alloy, plastic resin and other materials. ASIMO runs on a rechargeable lithium ion battery, with an approximate operating time of 40 minutes before recharging.

Previous versions of ASIMO have entertained people around the United States, while showcasing its innovative technology, including ringing the opening bell on the New York Stock Exchange, conducting the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, walking the red carpet at a Hollywood movie premiere, and appearing in regular performances at Disneyland.

About Honda
Honda established operations in America in 1959, and now employs more than 26,000 associates in its U.S. sales, R&D and manufacturing operations with a capital investment of more than $12.5 billion.

Based on its longstanding commitment to "build products close to the customer" Honda operates 14 major manufacturing facilities in North America, producing a wide range of Honda and Acura automobiles, automobile engines and transmissions, Honda all-terrain vehicles, and power equipment products such as lawn mowers, mini-tillers and general purpose engines, using domestic and globally sourced parts.

Seven Honda auto plants in the region, including four in the U.S., have the capacity to produce 1.92 million automobiles each year. In 2013, nearly 95 percent of the Honda and Acura automobiles sold in the U.S. were produced in North America.

Honda operates major research and development centers in the U.S. that fully design, develop and engineer many of the products Honda produces in North America.

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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      GR
      • 8 Months Ago
      I really don't get it. Toyota makes a useless robot that speaks Japanese and sends it to space to have conversations with a Japanese astronaut. Honda makes their latest ASIMO that does other useless things. Meanwhile, Japan is suffering a major radiation crisis and is resorting to hiring destitute men to expose themselves to very dangerous levels of radiation to clean up the mess. Idea: why not stop F-ing around with stupid, pointless robots and create robots that should be doing things like cleaning up radiation messes instead of sending humans who will likely die from it later on? Honestly, I'd be impressed with Toyota and Honda enough to buy their cars if they can make robots that could do something as dire as this and save human lives doing it. Otherwise, I can care less for these stupid publicity stunts that the robots currently serve.
        BTCC
        • 8 Months Ago
        @GR
        Actually, Honda built a robot for inspecting that reactor. And guess where the knowledge came from for that robot? http://world.honda.com/news/2013/c130617High-Access-Survey-Robot/
          GR
          • 8 Months Ago
          @BTCC
          Awesome, an inspecting robot. So... where are the ones that actually do something other than look at things? Hence, the men going in to do the labor.
        sstowes
        • 8 Months Ago
        @GR
        "I really don't get it." Don't feel too bad. A lot of people assume Honda is "just a car company". Honda is a mobility company and has always put engineering first, car-making second. Autoblog's above examples aren't particularly good examples of the lessons learned from ASIMO. The High Access Survey Robot (which they sent in for inspecting the reactor), and the mobility projects such as Stride Management Assist and Bodyweight Assist are more inline with ASIMO's purpose. http://asimo.honda.com/innovations/ That said, maybe in the future you shouldn't comment on things you have no interest in, nor know anything about. People here have been really snide lately.
          GR
          • 8 Months Ago
          @sstowes
          First, Honda is an engine maker. They simply started making vehicles to put their engines in. They started out as a motorcycle maker. Robotics is something that came much later on. ASIMO, if anything, is a publicity stunt for them. Hence, the media coverage every time it does something mundane like walk or open a bottle like this very article. Also, I'm of Japanese descent and have been following the nuclear reactor issue carefully because of vested interest. They are in over their heads and need humans to fix things because there aren't robots capable of doing so. The sad thing is that Japan is the global leader in robot technology and of anyone, would have the capability to do it. Yet, it isn't there. Despite your accusations of my ignorance, it's precisely because Japan has focused on robots to do rather mundane or needless things instead of what they should really be doing. What seems more important to you? Having a robot to carry old people around or having a robot to work in radioactively contaminated areas? Don't even try to tell me about the aging population of Japan. I have two Japanese grandparents there in an assisted living facility. No robots needed. I was going to school on a man-made island via an unmanned monorail 20 years ago in Japan. They have the technology to make specialized robots but they simply have never invested in having them be haz-mat applicable because they cared more about publicity with robots than actual practical applications that would garner as much attention. The consequence is that now they don't have robots capable of handling/working in hazardous areas and have to send in poor people who are willing to take the cash given that lack of life choices they have. Despite your accusations of me being snide, it's actually painful to hear that TEPCO is hiring men to give up their health for some cash given there are no robots to do the work.
      BTCC
      • 8 Months Ago
      Meanwhile, Detroit is working on this amazing piece. http://translogic.aolautos.com/2012/04/02/translogic-98-mabel-walking-robot/ LOL
        rlog100
        • 8 Months Ago
        @BTCC
        Guess it may seem bad to you if you're a sucker for showmanship which is what ASIMO is all about and don't care about real application.
          BTCC
          • 8 Months Ago
          @rlog100
          LOL at yomama
      mary.keana
      • 8 Months Ago
      Just have to laugh at the trolls that discredit the amazing technology in ASIMO.
      carguy1701
      • 8 Months Ago
      Needs more Robot Rock. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r2tYJoocSgg