• Apr 2nd 2014 at 11:58AM
  • 12
JAPAN-AUTO-ENVIRONMENT
  • JAPAN-AUTO-ENVIRONMENT
  • Employees of Japan's electric vehicle venture SIM-Drive dust the fourth generation model of the company's electric vehicle 'SIM-HAL' at the University of Tokyo on March 31, 2014. SIM-HAL has newly developed highly efficient in-wheel motors for all wheels and enables a drive of 400km with a charge. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Image Credit: Getty Editorial
  • JAPAN-AUTO-ENVIRONMENT
  • Employees of Japan's electric vehicle venture SIM-Drive dust the fourth generation model of the company's electric vehicle 'SIM-HAL' at the University of Tokyo on March 31, 2014. SIM-HAL has newly developed highly efficient in-wheel motors for all wheels and enables a drive of 400km with a charge. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Image Credit: Getty Editorial
  • JAPAN-AUTO-ENVIRONMENT
  • Japan's electric vehicle venture SIM-Drive chairman Soichiro Fukutake (L) and president Nobuhiro Tajima display the fourth generation model of the company's electric vehicle 'SIM-HAL' at the University of Tokyo on March 31, 2014. SIM-HAL has newly developed highly efficient in-wheel motors for all wheels and enables a drive of 400km with a charge. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Image Credit: Getty Editorial
  • JAPAN-AUTO-ENVIRONMENT
  • An employee of Japan's electric vehicle venture SIM-Drive dusts the fourth generation model of the company's electric vehicle 'SIM-HAL' at the University of Tokyo on March 31, 2014. SIM-HAL has newly developed highly efficient in-wheel motors for all wheels and enables a drive of 400km with a charge. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Image Credit: Getty Editorial
  • JAPAN-AUTO-ENVIRONMENT
  • Japan's electric vehicle venture SIM-Drive chairman Soichiro Fukutake (L) smiles as he sits inside the fourth generation model of the company's electric vehicle 'SIM-HAL' at the University of Tokyo on March 31, 2014. SIM-HAL has newly developed highly efficient in-wheel motors for all wheels and enables a drive of 400km with a charge. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Image Credit: Getty Editorial
  • JAPAN-AUTO-ENVIRONMENT
  • Journalists look at Japanese electric vehicle venture SIM-Drive's new 'SIM-HAL' at the University of Tokyo on March 31, 2014. SIM-HAL has newly developed highly efficient in-wheel motors for all wheels and enables a drive of 400km with a charge. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Image Credit: Getty Editorial
In Japan, it seems the fourth time's a charm. Meet SIM-HAL, the latest prototype from SIM-Drive and its partners. Like its three predecessors – the SIM-LEI, SIM-WIL, and SIM-CEL – this all-electric vehicle is a rolling exercise in efficiency and performance that depends upon a motor in each wheel to accelerate and recapture braking energy, while keeping mechanical drivetrain losses to the utmost minimum. It's also a little easier on the eyes than its forebears, sacrificing some utility and cabin space in favor of a sporty two-door coupe design. As a bonus, it won't refuse to open any pod bay doors.

Standing for "High efficiency All-wheel Link", HAL celebrates the company's continuing technological progress, boasting its latest "light-weight/high efficiency SS motor." These units are capable of an impressive 65 kW (87.17 horsepower) and 620 Nm (457.28 pound-feet) of torque each. Multiplied by four, that's 260 kW (348.7 hp) and 1,829.15 lb-ft of twisting force. Apply those numbers to the pavement in the 1,510-kg (3,329-pound) car and you're hitting 100 kph (62.14 miles per hour) in a respectable 4.7 seconds. Top speed is capped at 180 kph (111.8 mph).

While we, of course, love performance, efficiency is what really counts when it comes to electric vehicles. Here, the two-seater raises both eyebrows and the corners of lips, coaxing 404.1 km (251.1 miles) from its 35.1 kWh lithium battery using the somewhat generous JC08 protocol. That works out to a very economical 86.9 Wh/km (139.91 Wh/mile).

While we wait for more details to emerge and, hopefully, video of the SIM-HAL in action, we offer up below footage from another SIM-Drive vehicle, a Toyota AE86 electric conversion, below.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 12 Comments
      SublimeKnight
      • 1 Year Ago
      Over 7 mi/kWh in a 3300lb car. That sounds completely reasonable and totally within the laws of physics... at 20 mph, downhill, with a stiff tailwind.
      danfred311
      • 1 Year Ago
      Good car design isn't easy but the fascia is a do over. Not only heinous but such holes are aerodynamic faux pas. 1500kg is bizarrely wrong. No real wheel covers, no aerodesign in the rims. No video mirrors, no countersunk wiper. Many obvious ways to improve it. Padicakuo desu. sigh :)
      paulwesterberg
      • 1 Year Ago
      Autoblog deleted 5 of my posts today. I am quitting this site.
        Domenick
        • 1 Year Ago
        @paulwesterberg
        We apologize for the disappearance of the comments. It is not intentional, but rather, some flaw with the commenting system.Yesterday was particularly bad, but it's being looked into. I had written a reply to one of your original comments about this but, alas, it too disappeared.
      GoodCheer
      • 1 Year Ago
      Even assuming the JC08 is off by a factor of 2 from real world, that's still very good.
      • 1 Year Ago
      Umm, isn't that "fourth"? As in: first, second, third, fourth? Not as in "Go forth and multiply"
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