Bill O'Reilly is a fan of Tesla. Calling the California car company "the one concrete thing that all responsible people should be rooting for," the popular Fox Network host is asking everyone to ignore the green lobby, the politics of global warming and dim opinions of alternative energy, declaring, "If Tesla can make a clean car, the entire automotive industry can. Therefore the air would be cleaner everywhere, and our wallets thicker. So let's get on it, people."

O'Reilly's Tesla-backing Talking Points Commentary came after 60 Minutes' recent piece on the electric car maker, but was occasioned by a new UN report on global warming. As usual, he isn't shy about sharing his real feelings, and you'll find a lot more of them where that came from in the two-minute video below.



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  • 232 Comments
      offib
      • 8 Months Ago
      Is Bill O'Reilly feeling alright?
      ccl4151
      • 8 Months Ago
      O Reilly is an A#@.I would never buy a Tesla,and never do anything Bull says
        Ele Truk
        • 8 Months Ago
        @ccl4151
        Even a broken clock is right 2 times per day. So even as backwards and ill-informed a O'Reilly is, he is not necessarily wrong about Tesla.
      Sandra Tsai
      • 8 Months Ago
      Have to agree with old Bill on this one. If every car in America were electric AND got its electricity from our existing coal, natural gas, nuclear, wind and solar plants the AIR WOULD BE CLEANER. You gotta love Tesla! Talk about a quality car. My husband is lucky enough to work for a company that has a contract with them, so we were able to get one at a great price. (Otherwise we wouldnt be able to afford). Also, the insurance companies are all jumping on the opportunity to insure them... I found insurance for mine for $25/month from Insurance Panda... Not to mention the fact that every Tesla buyer is still getting a federal government subsidy of $7500. I'm sure you'll start seeing more and more Teslas in people's garages over time... Especially with the recent troubles of GM, Jeep, and Toyota. More and more manufacturers like Ford, BMW and others are all building or have plans to build electric vehicles. Modern electric vehicles just make more sense and will continue to improve over time. .
        Technoir
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Sandra Tsai
        If your insurance costs $25 per month, I can guarantee you that they cover almost nothing.
      floorman56
      • 8 Months Ago
      Type your comment hereAnd the $80,000 question asked by Dennis Miller What color is your tesla bill? He said " OH I'm NOT getting one, There is no where for me to charge it !!!"
        Jim1961
        • 8 Months Ago
        @floorman56
        This is only a test. Damn these comment system bugs!
      Jim1961
      • 8 Months Ago
      An article featuring Bill O'Reilly is bound result in political BS comments. Here's mine: I consider myself a moderate. Just because I don't vote for a certain politician doesn't mean I hate everyone in his/her political party. To conservatives: I agree with O'Reilly the best way to hurt Putin and OPEC is to stop buying their oil and gas. Putin is interested in Ukraine for one reason: Petroleum/Natural gas. Electric cars are super-efficient, more than twice as efficient as the best hybrid. I'm currently leasing a 2012 Nissan Leaf and a 2013 Chevy Volt. I love these cars. The Leaf isn't the prettiest car in the world but it's the cheapest car you can buy in total cost of ownership. Edmunds says the five year cost of ownership of the Leaf beats every car new or used! (This can vary based on electricity rates) The Volt is a damn nice car and according to Edmunds it's the second least expensive car in TCO after the Leaf. I spend about $20 per month on gas and my total monthly electric bill is about $100 when it's not air conditioning season. The Chevy Volt is the most dependable compact car according to JD Power. The three best-selling plugin cars, Model S, Volt and Leaf are all built in the USA. We should be proud of that. To liberals: Don't look a gift horse in the mouth. O'Reilly did a good job of debating Boling on the subject. Next thing we know, O'Reilly might even embrace all plugin cars, including the most evil Obamacar, the Chevy Volt. It could happen.
      John
      • 1 Month Ago

      To be able to sell electric cars ,a subsidy from the tax payer is needed to encourage buyers. So now lower income people who cannot afford a Tesla have their tax money taken from them by the government and given to a buyer who makes much more money, to buy a very expensive electric Tesla. So now these buyers can brag as to how they are being such caring people. Doesn't that just grab you!  One company CEO asked people not to buy their electric car because the company lost $14,000.00 per unit!!! And don't turn on any accessories when driving; A/C, heater-or fans, wipers,radio,GPS, don't adjust your seats, open the windows, it takes from the range of the vehicle. OHHH ... and don't forget cold weather driving; your'e only going HALF the distance claimed..ask someone in an electric wheel chair.   I like the concept, it just isn't there yet!

      Steve Surgeont
      • 4 Months Ago

      Bill O'nreily is turning into a mindless liberal. After pretending to be a conservative for years he is starting to spill his true self now that he has the platform. If he had of come off as a dumb liberal at first nobody would know who he is. I had been a huge fan until about a year ago when his constant bent making everything about himself and. and the fact that he would be very careful never to let anyone tag him as conservative or a liberal. That made me suspicious as when one believes in something, they arent afraid to expose it. "Or where am I going wrong?"  Also when we have an overabundance of natural gas and its cheap and the current engines we already make are easily converted to NG, then why isnt that choice made over Hydrogen fuel cells, and electric. If we did as O'reily said, and everybody buy a tesla then the grid system would have to be replaced as well because its not 'up to' everyone plugging in their crappy battery mobiles. Think about it. You are expending energy to carry around an 800 + pound battery as your source of power which is going to use a lot of power just for that. . NG isnt heavy. No new technology is really needed as we have had NG cars/trucks since 1931. I dont have a tinfoil hat but with all the discrepancies Im seeing lately, I may get one. Many things in society arent adding up.

      Fountain42
      • 8 Months Ago
      WOW....a lot of confidence in a car company with ZERO track record. AND..the track record to date has been filled with doubt........ie...fires......I like Cool-Aid but I need to drink it in moderation!!!!
        Jake Laird
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Fountain42
        I guess making a phenomenal world-class car constitutes as having no track record.
          Grendal
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Jake Laird
          Neez. See. I'm glad I apologized since you are engaging in a reasoned discussion. I appreciate that. I mentioned Paul Walker because there are similarities to the third Model S fire. http://www.cnn.com/2013/12/04/showbiz/paul-walker-autopsy/ The PW crash happened at 50 MPH and the result was that both occupants were killed and burned when the car erupted in flames. The Model S impacted a concrete wall at 110 MPH went through it and into a tree in the third fire. All occupants walked away safely since the fire was kept out of the passenger compartment. So the conclusion is that, yes, batteries can catch fire just like gasoline and oil can. The Model S is designed to direct battery fires away from causing harm to passengers. That is why no one has been hurt or killed in even very severe accidents. The fires might look dramatic and scary but the fact remains that drivers and passengers remain safe in spite of all the fireworks. That is what safety comes down to fundamentally - being safe. I would compare the Model S to any car on the road for safety because of what has actually happened.
          Joeviocoe
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Jake Laird
          Neez, you are showing your complete ignorance of simple facts that can be checked with a 5 second google search. Do you really need to be embarrassed with another fact check?
          Neez
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Jake Laird
          Depends on your scope of what's considered world class?? As a world class EV, yes, as a world class car, hells no..... And again, it has zero track record, people just want to cover up their ears and makes excuses when it comes to fires. Lithium ion batteries explode, period. They are very dangerous even in small devices which when punctured, rupture in a fiery inferno, more severe than gasoline IMO. I've known this for years in regards to small electronics, way before EV's were even on the scene. Can't imagine experiencing a giant battery pack explosion.
          Marco Polo
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Jake Laird
          @ Neez You should know better than to respond to either Tesla fans, or Troglodytes. It's true that Tesla in the conventional sense has yet to prove a long term track record (although that's not far off). Lithium ion batteries are not "very explosive". Every device which stores energy has an element of danger. (including fuel tanks). But the fire risk involved in EV technology has proved insignificant, certainly less that than gasoline (ask any insurance actuary ).
          Grendal
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Jake Laird
          I apologize to you Neez. I know you are not a coward since you engage in discussion. I still disagree with your statement though. But I got cranky and ranted, so sorry.
          Neez
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Jake Laird
          @ Grendal You are going to compare Paul Walkers death of traveling at mach 90 speed to a car getting hit by road debris and puncturing the battery???? Paul was most likely dead before the car even caught on fire, the car was mangled from the speed of the impact. THe fire was secondary and irrelevant to his death. Second, lithium ion fires are more volatile than gasoline, and when you have an entire pack spanning the length of the underbelly, you have more of a critical damage zone to worry about. With a gasoline car, the tank is tucked under the passenger seat or between the chassis rails etc... It's more protected by it's location and has less of a bullseye area on the vehicle. Look up lithium ion battery explosions on youtube. See what happens when one is improperly charged or punctured. Now tesla has proven the batteries need more protection and requires a titanium shield, titanium is very expensive, definitely can't ever be used in large quantities on mass poduced consumer vehicles, ever. You would never hit your price target.
          Neez
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Jake Laird
          @Joevioco Lots of irony in your statement.
        Mike Bassi
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Fountain42
        Hate to tell you but Tesla has a great track record with this car. 4 reported fires for the amount of the car sold is lower than any mass produced car currently out. The fire thing is glorified because of the new technology. It is safer than any car line being produced and that's a fact. You should look into it.
          Neez
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Mike Bassi
          Out of context that may seem true, but from simple road debri with very little damage?? There just aren't enough teslas in accidents yet to have any conclusive data.
        Jon
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Fountain42
        2/10
      ferps
      • 8 Months Ago
      Remember when the Republican Presidential nominee, the one chosen for his supposed business acumen, called Tesla a "loser?" Tesla is now worth about 3x was Staples is worth, and will probably end up being this decade's biggest American success story.
        Spec
        • 8 Months Ago
        @ferps
        Yeah, Romney really stuck his foot in his mouth with that one. And he as a supposed venture investor should know more than most that sometimes you win and sometimes you lose on investments.
        Tim
        • 8 Months Ago
        @ferps
        When Tesla pays back the 1/2 Billion $$$$ they got in aid from USA thay can crow about being a "Winner" and not until then. They are oporating on MY TAX DOLLARS! Ford Motor Company did not accept any bailout like the other automakers. I will by FORD for the rest of my life.
          Shanti
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Tim
          Tim: You're kidding, right? Have you been under a rock for the last year? http://business.time.com/2013/05/23/loser-no-more-tesla-repays-465-million-u-s-loan/
          Grendal
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Tim
          Tim! Ford took $5.9 BILLION from the same program (ATVM loan program) as Tesla and will be paying it back over the next 24 years. So according to your own beliefs Tesla is the ONLY company you should be buying a car from since they paid back their loan with $26 million in interest. Tesla is currently the only US car manufacturer that doesn't owe the American taxpayer or had a massive debt tossed out.
      takekaze
      • 8 Months Ago
      It's a toy. A nice toy. An advanced toy. But still a toy. E-cars have 2 major issues. 1) Storage of electricity is limited to batteries. There is currently no better way than what we know from what every car has: the classic car battery. That system has been around for a very long time and yet no significant improvements were made. 2) Infrastructure. The power grid in the US is outdated compared to the grids in, for example, Germany. But even the German grid wouldn't be able to survive too many e-cars. Not to mention that the Germans are working hard at destroying their energy production with the so called "Energiewende" and thus turning electricity from a commodity for everyone to a luxury only a select few can afford (current estimates for future prices in Germany, if the current insanity continues, are €0.6-€1.5 per kWh, only a few can afford that.) There's actually a third point. With the insane hysteria about producing electricity and shifting it to systems that are outdated, inefficient and unreliable (aka wind and solar) rather than efficient, state of the art and reliable (aka coal, oil and nuclear) the price for it will go up. That means that only very rich people can afford an e-car (which is already ridiculously expensive and effectively not competitive in the market.) Then again, this is Bill O'Reilly. What would he know about reality. He gets paid to sell an opinion and not facts, just like all the muckrakers in the media from CNN to FOX, from ABC to BBC.
        Spec
        • 8 Months Ago
        @takekaze
        Wow. A trifecta! All three of your points are wrong. Amazing. 1) You really don't know the difference between a lead-acid battery and a Li-Ion battery? Have you not used a cellphone? Duh. 2) See PNNL report that revealed that as long as EVs are charged at night, we could add some 73 million EVs without a single new power plant. 3) My solar PV system provides me with cheaper electricity than the utility did. You can keep paying for 19th century electricity.
        GR
        • 8 Months Ago
        @takekaze
        Honestly, Bill O'Reilly's usual drivel makes more sense than the outdated nonsense you wrote. You appear to be stuck in an era decades ago. You have absolutely omitted any inkling of the reality that technologies are improving and advancing. This applies to both batteries and renewable energy sources like solar.
        brotherkenny4
        • 8 Months Ago
        @takekaze
        A toy like every Mercedes, BMW, most SUVs, most pick-ups, Audi, Volvo, Cadillac, Buick or any other vehicle that is chosen because of any issue other than base transportation. The rest of your statement is incoherent. Please reiterate using facts.
      Neez
      • 8 Months Ago
      The model S still loses and electric cars still fail for the masses. Right now the only people that have them are people with deep wallets, and really i don't think any owner of a tesla has a model S as their sole mode of transportation. I guaruntee even Elon Musk has at least 1 gas powered car or just uses a limo service. They also fail to mention that all of these people that own Tesla's have a garage to add a 240v outlet. How is the rest of middle to lower class america going to charge their car??? Until they figure out a quicker way to get a full charge, this technology is still on hold. Battery technology is reaching a point of diminished returns. It's starting to level off in new innovations and improvements. Until a new technology which hasn't been invented yet comes out, electric cars still aren't feasible for the rest of us. The logistics just don't work out, no matter how good the tesla cars get. Until it can be charged quickly(within 10 minutes), the rest of us won't bite. That's where their research and developement should go.
        Joeviocoe
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Neez
        You must be living under a rock. Almost half of Americans live in a place with dedicated parking space like a garage or car port. 120V is enough power to give you 40 miles of range every night... which is enough for most commutes. $35k for a 200 mile EV does NOT require, "deep pockets". --" Until they figure out a quicker way to get a full charge," It is called a Supercharger... and Tesla is building 4 or 5 every week. --"Until it can be charged quickly(within 10 minutes)" How is 90 seconds for you. It has been demonstrated already and Tesla plans to build some swap stations in CA by this summer. Your objections are outdated, and you are quickly becoming a minority.
          Joeviocoe
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Read the countless stocks about the model E. People are bashing Tesla saying acting like a 200 mile, $35k EV is impossible. Are you seriously that impatient that you want to demand Tesla to produce everything you want right now?
          fairfireman21
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Joe, What! $35K for a 200 mile range electric car? What car might that be? Even the Leaf is $29,000 and only will get 100 miles on the best of days. A base Tesla is $70K. It must take deep pockets because we could not afford $35K for a car. $35K for a car would cost nearly $600 per month, please tell me how everyday Joe can afford that, and that is only at 1% per year interest. If I was to spend $35K on a car I would want more than a 40 mile range after charging it for several hours on 120 volt. Yes 40 miles is enough for most commutes but what if you drive 20 miles one way and you have errands to do as well, or what if it is winter and freezing, or summer and 90 out? It is a known fact temperature affects range. I have no garage or car port and must park on city property just off the street how do you put a charger out there? Superchargers? Not around here. Swap stations in CA? That does me a lot of good being 2000 miles away. Realy We are "quickly" becoming minorities. Out of the millions of cars sold last year how many were electric? I do not know one person that owns one, but I do know of 15 people that bought new cars last year. Even a "tree hugger" friend of mine says they are not close to being good for the average Joe.
          fairfireman21
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          Forgot to state that I will back them. I do think electric cars are great but they are only great for the people that can use them to their full potental, and that can afford them.
          Joeviocoe
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          --" if you did get that figure from somewhere, i doubt it would be reliable" How about the Census Bureau? https://www.census.gov/prod/99pubs/ahb-9901.pdf Page 2 ""All this leaves about 7.8 million households who must rely on street parking. Of course, not all of those households have vehicles. Four in ten households who report no offstreet or garage parking also have no vehicles."" -------------------- And Tesla has already proven they don't have to standardize their cars with other automakers to be successful. They can just build the infrastructure themselves.
          MTN RANGER
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          You don't need a garage to charge an EV. Plenty of people have mounted charging stations outside (some are waterproof) and charge their cars on their driveway or yard. This isn't rocket science. http://207.99.69.140/volt/DSCN0754web.jpg http://www.plugincars.com/sites/default/files/seatlle-blink3.jpg
        Paul Smith
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Neez
        This may shock you, be evreyone who owns an electric stove has to have a 240 volt hookup! How do they manage?!! I didn't know the technology was on hold. I heard that 100s of thousands of electric cars were being sold. Hmmm,.
          fairfireman21
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Paul Smith
          Paul, You are right but are you going to unplug your stove to plug in your car? No you must add another outlet, but first you have to see if your breaker box can hold another double pull breaker, and you need to be sure you have enouph amps going into the main box. If you have a 60 or even a 100 amp main depending on what is in your house you may need to upgade to a 200 amp main which requires an electrician to do it. Like Neez said what if you have no garage then what? I agree with Neez they are not quite there for the average American. I can not afford to purchace one, nor can I plug it in if I could buy one. I have no garage. Plus for a base Tesla at $69,900 I could drive my Silverado for over 8 years at 13,000 miles per year getting 15 mpg with gas at $10 per gallon, or I could drive the Cruze for over 10 years and that is even subtracting what we still owe on it with it only getting 26 mpg with gas again at $10 per gallon. Face it Tesla is only for the rich, and even the Leaf is not worth $29,000 when you may get as little as 40 to as much as 100 mile range, with no public fast chargers whithin 50 miles of here.
          comintheusa
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Paul Smith
          The 240v outlet used for stoves is to be plugged in and left, unlike an electric vehicle which will be plugged in almost daily. Thus much more robust connectors are required for an electric vehicle.
          Neez
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Paul Smith
          You're an idiot. Of course you can get 240V in your house, that's not the issue. Nor is the cost of adding the outlet to your garage. That's negligible when buying a car, an extra couple hundred bucks isn't so bad. It's the actual "garage" which is the important focal point of my statement. If you live in an apartment complex, in the city, etc.... It's difficult and time consuming to charge your car.
        goodoldgorr
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Neez
        Im glad you think like me. Here in this site I have big difficulty thinking like the majority. I probably had one of the highest downvote of all hitting a minus 16 months ago. The highest up vote I ever had was a plus 4 years ago. All you said I said it in one form or another at some time. Many lauph of my car a dodge neon that is one of the less polluting car ever that last long, here in this site people consume big gazguzzling suv, cash for clunkers and state subsidized costly polluting cars like tesla.
          Neez
          • 8 Months Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          It's not about being realistic or telling people the truth. The haters all just like what they want to hear, not have a reasonable scientific discussion.
        chicl
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Neez
        Gorr says, " you think like me "... Neez, damn... that has got to hurt your argument
        Grendal
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Neez
        Neez seems to think the entire population of the country lives and drives exactly the same as he does to make such judgments for the rest of us. It's funny, Neez, how you constantly tell everyone how it just doesn't work when you are well aware that no one has said that you need to buy one. I suppose you know what is best for all of us. Just like most politicians seem to do. Are you a politician?
          Neez
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Grendal
          No, i never said you shouldn't buy one. You're putting words in my mouth, i never said that at all, that's something politicians do, are you a politician. If you like it, buy it. I simply stated it doesnt work for the masses yet, it's still not a feasible option until they sort out the quick charge situation. Then it works for everyone.
          Neez
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Grendal
          @ Grendal, It's a niche car, and it's successful at that. If i were rich, i'd own one too, i'd use it to putz around town with. My statement was it isn't ready for the masses. There's this huge assumption from people that it is, it's not. They are still a long way off until they can sort out the logistics.
      knightrider_6
      • 8 Months Ago
      Look at all the Teabaggers losing their $hit because their messiah told them to buy Tesla. You guys are so predictable, like a dog. It's hilarious!
        Chris
        • 8 Months Ago
        @knightrider_6
        I thought you liberals were supposed to be tolerant and understanding. That said, what's with all the name calling and generalizations in your post?
          Mark Schaffer
          • 8 Months Ago
          @Chris
          Why should educated people be tolerant of the kind of stupid that posts with a skull and crossbones as if that means anything?
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