The unveiling of the Qoros 3 hatch was somewhat disappointing for us at AutoblogGreen in that it wasn't a production version of the plug-in hybrid concept that it showed last year in Geneva. The Chinese automaker has, however, blunted that trauma by rolling out a handsome two-wheel human/electric hybrid that we'd probably prefer to pilot more than that car. Weather permitting, at least.

The Qoros eBIQE concept is a beast of a bike.

The Qoros eBIQE concept is a beast of a bike. Fully suspended and capable of quickly hitting 65 kilometers per hour (40 miles per hour) in power mode, it features hand-laminated carbon-fiber bodywork wrapped around a tough steel frame. Its brutish strength is complemented by sophistication, as it's fitted with a five-inch touchscreen offering a wealth of information and the ability to shape performance with the environment you find yourself in.

Off-road, one can go pull 12 kW (16 horsepower) from the in-wheel motor with Power mode or, if one needs to stay within certain legal limits, there is a much milder Street mode. There is also a third setting, Eco, which allows for moderate off-road performance and stretches the range from its 1.3-kWh lithium battery to 100 km (62 miles). Other tricks up its digital sleeve include route planning with real-time navigation, social networking super powers and a heads up on things like tire pressures and available range.

If all this sounds and looks a bit familiar, it ought to. While it does have its own stylistic flair, the eBIQE concept is based heavily on the G-12 from Greyp Bikes, sister company of electric supercar maker Rimac Automobili. This is good since, if Qoros decides not to take this past the concept stage and offer them for sale in its showrooms, one can still buy the original. Scroll down for more details in the official press release.
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GENEVA WORLD PREMIERE: QOROS eBIQE CONCEPT
  • Concept electric bike showcases Qoros design and connectivity
  • Designed for modern metropolitan always-connected commuters and leisure riders
Geneva, 4 March 2014 - Qoros, the new international car brand, is today staging the premiere of its eBIQE Concept at the 84th Geneva Motor Show. The eBIQE Concept is created for the modern metropolitan consumer, with exceptional performance that can be used for commuting, leisurely rides or exploratory off-road adventures. It is a concept of a cloud-connected electric bike and showcases numerous Qoros design cues carried over from its production cars, as well as innovative technology and impressive performance.

Riders can choose to pedal with no assistance, pedal with assistance from the electric motor, or go with motor-power only. When using the motor, users can choose between three driving modes: Street, which limits top speed to 25 km/h so it may avoid being legally classified as a motorcycle in some countries; Eco, which maximises energy-efficiency; and Power, which allows for faster acceleration and a top speed of 65 km/h. With 60 Nm of torque available throughout the rev range, on battery power alone, the eBIQE Concept in this mode can reach 25 km/h in an impressive two seconds. It has a charge time of just 80 minutes from any regular power outlet – perfect for the city dweller.

The connected technology used in the eBIQE Concept is based on the innovative QorosQloud platform (which is standard on most Qoros cars) and adapts its functionality for application to the electric bike to ensure it delivers highly relevant features and services for the rider. With a permanent 3G connection it is operated through an advanced five-inch touchscreen mounted on the handlebars (a downsized version of the eight-inch Qoros MMHTM screen seen on all Qoros cars), or in the cloud via the user's smartphone, tablet, PC or Mac using the dedicated website (www.qorosqloud.com) or app.

The cloud-connected system will be able to offer many industry-leading functions, such as advanced route planning, intelligent navigation, the ability to remotely check the eBIQE Concept's condition (tyre pressures, battery charge and range), and networking capabilities through social media, with the ability to share favourite routes and points of interest or arrange impromptu meet-ups with fellow riders.

Similar to the system already available in Qoros' cars, thanks to its permanent 3G connection, QorosQloud will provide navigation that incorporates real-time updates for incidents, travel times, weather and charging points. And its cloud connectivity means that the system's enhanced mapping data is especially valuable when riders head off-road. With a satellite overlay map view it could display topographical information so he or she can make better informed decisions about what direction to take. Alternatively because QorosQloud synchronises with the user's smartphone, tablet or computer, rides can be planned ahead from inside the home or office.

"The intent is to adapt the QorosQloud platform that is already being enjoyed by drivers of our cars so that it would deliver the same level of powerful functionality, convenience and social networking services to enhance the eBIQE Concept rider's experience," explains Stefano Villanti, Executive Director of Sales and Marketing at Qoros. "Even the Eco-drive monitoring service that helps Qoros drivers to increase their driving efficiency is considered in the eBIQE Concept, with the ride behaviour analysis feature conceptually developed to enable users to assess their riding style.

"QorosQloud can allow riders of the eBIQE Concept to integrate like never before with the physical and digital world while making their lives easier and more enjoyable," concludes Villanti.

The eBIQE Concept features a fingerprint recognition system, with the ability to recognise multiple users. This, in conjunction with geolocation technology, could make the eBIQE Concept highly suitable for integration into vehicle sharing schemes. Another stand-out feature is regenerative braking. A rarity on electric bikes, it enables the electric motor to generate electricity while slowing down, with this energy fed back into the battery pack increasing efficiency and range.

Although the surface area and exterior features were quite limited compared to the relatively expansive body of a car, the design team ensured that the eBIQE Concept successfully incorporates Qoros' design DNA. The body is hand-laminated carbon-fibre, based on the steel frame of the G12 electric bike from Greyp. The team applied clean horizontal lines, a forward-leaning wedge profile and a hockey stick-shaped spoiler– all typical Qoros design traits.

Gert Hildebrand, Executive Director of Design at Qoros, said: "We designed the eBIQE Concept with our modern metropolitan customers in mind. It embodies some of our key philosophies - simple and elegant design, cutting-edge technology and the desire to make our customers lives easier and more enjoyable. As with our cars we delivered all this while creating a product with uncompromising standards of high quality.

"There are over 130 million e-bikes in China, where several major cities have already restricted the use of gasoline motorbikes or have banned them completely. Chinese e-bikes are primarily used for commuting, but the Qoros eBIQE Concept was conceived to go further – it performs superbly as a commuter and is fun and highly-capable in an off-road situation as well."

Suitable for commuting and for leisure rides, the Qoros eBIQE Concept combines the best of both worlds, and just like the brand's road cars it has a unique combination of attributes to enhance the lives of modern, metropolitan customers.

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

Qoros eBIQE Concept

General*

'Power' mode 'Street' mode 'Eco' mode
Power output: 12 kW 0.25 kW 4 kW
Torque: 200 Nm 60 Nm 100 Nm
Max. speed 65 km/h 25 km/h 60 km/h
Acceleration 0 - 65km/h 8.5 secs - -
Max. range: 80km 120km 100km
Weight: 49kg
Frame size: 19"

*(Motor only, no pedalling assistance)

Battery
Capacity: 1.3 kWh
Chemistry: Lithium Nanophosphate
Nominal voltage: 64V
Regen braking power: 2 kW
Recharge time: 80 minutes


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 18 Comments
      C. Walker Jr.
      • 9 Months Ago
      The choice to have dual discs up front and nothing on the back seems..... Interesting... (?)
      dan.frederiksen
      • 9 Months Ago
      Too elaborate which in turn hurts the price. Hand made carbon fiber, come on.. It's a bicycle and you want car price? stupid. And for a motorized vehicle, you want a more comfortable seat than that.
      • 9 Months Ago
      For DIY market there is also Greyborg frame or frameset with Cromotor, avaliable at affordable prices. www.zelenavozila.com
      2 wheeled menace
      • 9 Months Ago
      " 1.3-kWh lithium battery to 100 km (62 miles)" Yeah, at ~15-20 miles per hour with pedaling. Who's going to spend this money on a bike like that and ride it at pedal bike speeds though... really :) The battery choice i disagree with... lifepo4 is one of the heaviest batteries and that explains the weight. They could have stuffed twice the kw-hrs into the bike, and it would have been the same weight.. Impressive bike otherwise. Nice motor ( i have a slightly smaller version of that motor, and it's a riot ) , excellent looks..
        JP
        • 9 Months Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        On the other hand LiFePO4 is one of the longest lasting lithium chemistries, and safest. The bike has more range than most people will use anyway.
          2 wheeled menace
          • 9 Months Ago
          @JP
          One of the longest lasting and one of the safest, but also quite literally the most heavy. If you take it offroad or use it's full power, you are going to see the battery go about 10-15 miles, so that's really not enough battery. It's kind of like a sports car with a 1 gallon gasoline tank. Yeah, it's really fast! but if you exercise all that power you are paying for, you're going to run out of gasoline very fast. For that power, you need the biggest gas tank you can stuff into the damn thing.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 9 Months Ago
      Very nice, but what's the price?
      Ryan
      • 9 Months Ago
      This is the equivalent of a Ferrari or Lamborghini of bikes. More needs to be done on the low-end and durability of cheap e-bikes. It's not that I don't appriciate it, but I would rather not ride a bike that is 20x the cost of my current one, just because I don't want someone to steal it.
        Marco Polo
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Ryan
        @ Ryan But, it's also a sign of the times, that such a high end product is being offered by a PRC company.
      EZEE2
      • 9 Months Ago
      Soooooo around €6,000? How's about no? If I wanted an electric bike I would contact this menace that lives out in Colorado or Utah, I forget where, and pay him to build me something for 1/6 of the cost. Hey 2WM if you did produce a bike for sale, could the buyer provide his own glider first, or do you only build on certain frames?
        2 wheeled menace
        • 9 Months Ago
        @EZEE2
        I'm honored, sir ;) If i produced a bike for sale, i could go with almost any type of frame that the customer already has. I'd probably be using the components that this company provides.. :)
          Technoir
          • 9 Months Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          2wm I definitely wouldn't use just 'any frame'. Most bicycles are not designed to handle 50+ mph, let alone impacts and stresses experienced at these speeds. A bike with this kind of power needs a solid freeride mountain bike frame.
          Thereminator
          • 9 Months Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          You could buy an amazing mountain-bike for around $2,000 with much better suspension and then add your own components. Maybe end-up with half the coat of the bike.
          2 wheeled menace
          • 9 Months Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          This bike doesn't do 50+mph. So that's no worry. I've done 47mph on hardtail mountain frames when i weighed 270lbs though; i've been a part of the electric bike DIY community for many years now, and nobody has broken a frame from doing so. The problem is brakes and tires, not frame.
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