What do we know about the 2016 Chevy Volt? Well, for now, all we can do is try to put the puzzle together without the box. Thankfully, a new batch of pieces has arrived from a new report in Edmunds, which says that the 2016 model year will introduce the second generation of a car that hasn't been dramatically updated since it went on sale in 2010. The new Volt is getting an "evolutionary styling change" and will ride on a new front-drive platform that has been developed by General Motors. GM's Kevin Kelly told AutoblogGreen that he has "no comment on future products," but he did acknowledge that Chevrolet is working on a second-generation Volt, "but I can't say anything about timing."

Everybody already knew that a next-gen Volt is coming, so that's not a surprise. What we don't know is any real concrete information on the car itself. The few tidbits of information we do have help define the outlines of the next version of Chevy's halo car, but they're not confirmed yet. For the record, they range from the eye-raising (a $10,000 price drop) to the logical (20 percent more electric range). We can't see the whole picture yet, but the pieces do point to the 2016 Volt, which would be released next year sometime, being a much bigger deal than the last update, when the Volt's range was increased by three electric miles thanks to a battery capacity increase of 16 kWh to 16.5.


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  • 124 Comments
      scott3
      • 9 Months Ago
      Well there is a lot in play here. The present car was cobbled together at a time GM could hardly afford to pay attention. To be honest it is amazing they did what they did on the limited budget they had. Second the platform was the old Delta 2 that they had to use due to cost constraints. It was not their choice but the only real option they had. The Delta 2 was never intended to be a EV hybrid car but they made it work. Third the new DXX2 will be here soon and underpin the new car. It will be designed from the start to be used with the Volt Tech system. It should gain many advantages with the refinement started when the platform is designed. Fourth The new cars body will have to be pretty close to what they have now as it is based on Aero Performance and you can not change that aspect. Toyota has done similar with the Prius as they restyled it but the shape has not changed much. Look for the new Volt to have a new face, tail styling and other styling changes that do not effect the aero. I expect other refinements and additions that GM just did not have the money to do the first time. The key for this car was to get it to market to create a segment that really did not exist. Once established it gave suppliers the lead to invest in this segment to help draw down cost and to improve performance of their components. It all goes back to the Chicken or the Egg. No market no investment and no improvements in performance or price. Anyone can build a $75K-105K EV but not many can build one that will suit the needs of the average one car owner nor can they sell it for around $30K. The next car will go farther and cost less while being better refined. As for the ELR is also is just establishing a place in the market as GM like most other MFG never though anyone would spend that much for a Luxury electric. In due time the ELR will be short term and replaced with a better more affordable car. The last thing here is the Volt will be joined with a EV that will be very affordable and will go more than 200 miles on a charge. It will not have the ICE in it. GM has everything that Tesla has in the Volt and removing the ICE and adding a larger battery will make it on par for the same performance. I expect a Cadillac version of this too. Just because you have not been hearing much here does not mean GM is not working on new things. Just as you have not heard anything on the nearing Camaro the Volt has it secrets too. GM will surprise many with much of what they have coming in the next three years as there a great number of new product you have never heard a word on coming soon. About 18 months to 12 months is how far ahead GM is pulling the cover off many of the new products. We are also to the point there is no more left over GM products from the pre GM bail out. The ELR and Malibu were the last of the old GM. GM at one time had to tell it secrets 5 years out to keep the stock prices up but that is no longer an issue.
      edselfanboy
      • 9 Months Ago
      You never know about the future direction of tech. Elon Musk's (Tesla) new battery plant outside of Reno will have a capacity vastly exceeding Tesla's needs. For all we know Musk may become the "go to guy" for all auto manufacturer's battery needs. Several companies have explored buying Tesla just to gain it's very advanced battery tech. We gearheads live in very interesting times.
        Dave
        • 9 Months Ago
        @edselfanboy
        Its quite possible that most of the battery capacity will go to non-automotive use. http://www.solarcity.com/pressreleases/218/solarcity-introduces-energy-storage-for-businesses.aspx "SAN MATEO, Calif., Dec. 4, 2013—SolarCity® (Nasdaq: SCTY) has unveiled a smart energy storage system to address two major pain points for business: rising utility demand charges and increasing grid outages. SolarCity DemandLogicâ„¢ can allow businesses to reduce energy costs by using stored electricity to reduce peak demand, and can also provide backup power during grid outages. Developed with advanced battery technology from Tesla, SolarCity DemandLogic storage includes learning software that automates the discharge of stored energy to optimize utility charge savings for customers."
          Spec
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Dave
          I'm still highly skeptical of using high-density Li-Ions for stationary applications. They are just worth so much more as car batteries. You can use cheap heavy lead-acid batteries for stationary applications.
      yonomo200
      • 9 Months Ago
      Yes, I'll agree with that. Hence, "the future." What I mean is that electric cars will be the future in some form or another. The Volt is here and ready now. It's a transitional car. Also, at some point, fuel cell cars could be the future. But only if we can develop a practical way to produce hydrogen. As it is right now, hydrogen production costs too much in terms of energy. This does not mean that we should stop development of hydrogen powered cars. We need the technology for a day when it will be practical. Hydrogen power could go right on top of the Voltech platform or the Tesla platform. But again, only if and when hydrogen production becomes affordable.
      btc909
      • 9 Months Ago
      The major issue is the Delta II platform. Get rid of that and i'd personally would get a bit outrageous with the styling and these should sell well. Show commercials showing from home to work yet using no gasoline. Or a commercial over a period of months showing the lack of gas being used.
      ocnblu
      • 9 Months Ago
      I spotted a bizarre mistake in the Autoblog article, it made me chuckle in fact. Were you seriously stating the Volt is considered a "halo car"? How ridiculous is that. Corvette Stingray is Chevrolet's halo car. Not a ninny-mobile, glorified golf cart. Don't forget it.
        CoolWaters
        • 9 Months Ago
        @ocnblu
        Drug Mules drive across country, they could use the Volt for that!
        VL00
        • 9 Months Ago
        @ocnblu
        Aww, the ignorance is strong with this one. The Volt is the most technologically advanced car ever put on the road.
        yonomo200
        • 9 Months Ago
        @ocnblu
        There are different kinds of halos. This one happens to be green.
        Elmobob
        • 9 Months Ago
        @ocnblu
        Comparing the Chevy Volt or Nissan leaf to a glorified golf cart is like saying a Corvette is a glorified school bus since both happen to run on gasoline.
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Elmobob
          I would never buy a Chevy Volt, 'cause it can't pull my boat or carry three dozen rolls of roofing paper. What was Chevrolet thinkin'???
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Elmobob
          Um, the Leaf is all electric - so it does qualify as a 'glorified golf cart'. BMW has the new i3 that is a electric/gas hybrid (technology stolen from the Volt) with a longer battery life (80+ miles) but it has a very small fuel tank, so in reality it's a glorified golf cart with a go cart motor to get you home. The i3's not something you could drive cross country, unless you like stopping every hour or so for gas....
          mycommentemail
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Elmobob
          @scraejtp Yeah, I suspected that most people pull out the "cross country" line just to make a point. But I'm doing the same. Basically I'm trying to say: The right tool for the right job. If I had to make regular trips like yours I wouldn't buy an i3 (I'm not likely to buy one anyway, but the point still stands). I would most likely buy a Volt like you did. Where I live, however, I am unlikely to go more than 50 miles ever (except for the 2-3 times a year road trip). For me an electric car would make sense if I were in the market for a new car, and the i3 with its limited range extender would make a lot of sense (if it weren't cost prohibitive). Basically, the right tool for the right job. For some it is a gasoline powered car with a very long range. For others it is going to be something more like the leaf or i3, with the Volt falling somewhere in between. There is no point in ragging on one just because it doesn't fit your particular needs.
          scraejtp
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Elmobob
          @mycommentemail I doubt most people truly mean cross country, but rather longer road trips. I live in San Antonio, Tx and regularly make trips to Dallas to see family. This is over a 300 mile trip (SW SA to North Dallas), which can easily be handled without stopping for gas in my Volt. This same trip in the BMW i3 would require 3 fill-ups on the way. My father-in law can make the trip in his Tesla Model S with one stop at the supercharger in San Marcos. I can take quite a long trip without even leaving the state. A short range vehicle like the BMW would be considered a second vehicle to me, similar to a BEV.
          mycommentemail
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Elmobob
          Sheesh. What us this obsession everyone has with driving cross country? When have you EVER driven cross country? And more importantly, why? Haven't you ever heard of an airplane? If you are a long haul trucker, I don't know, maybe don't buy an electric car? But if you send all your time driving in a city... I don't see people freaking out about not being able to nail a nail into the wall with a screwdriver. Right tool for the right job (guess that applies to ABG comments as well).
      JB
      • 9 Months Ago
      I would like to see, battery options to save weight space and cost. If you have a 15 mile per day, get the 15-20 mile option and save a bundle. People are concentrating on using battery energy too much. If you wanted 100% battery, then get a BEV. Spare battery capacity is just weight and dragging your car down, you already lugging a ICE.
        CoolWaters
        • 9 Months Ago
        @JB
        Ford CMax.
          • 9 Months Ago
          @CoolWaters
          Found the CMax fun to drive, really liked it. But 20 mile range doesn't get me anywhere. And with Ford's reliability in the basement, plus lawsuits over fraudulent mileage claims, I gotta stay away.
          JB
          • 9 Months Ago
          @CoolWaters
          If the Fords did not have annoying battery bulge in hatch. The Volt looks better too.
          btc909
          • 9 Months Ago
          @CoolWaters
          I like the C-Max, a bit tight in the interior compared to a Prius V. Decent interior except for the dated gear selector. The exterior looks like a company / government car. No real exterior changes for 2014.
      sebringc5
      • 9 Months Ago
      Just create a BEV out of the Cruze platform and call it a day. Why have the complexity of a electric car AND an ICE under the same hood? All the best, Aaron Lephart smartcar451.com
        Chris O.
        • 9 Months Ago
        @sebringc5
        For a buyer, the current Volt could realistically be seen as the only car they'd need to purchase for their transportation needs. Turning it into a BEV, for many people, would relegate the Volt to a short-haul commuter. Granted, that's what many people need for much of their transportation needs, but a significant percentage of THOSE people will think that travel needs may occasionally exceed BEV range. Also, the best BEVs have a bespoke platform. A platform designed for an ICE will always have packaging and weight issues that a dedicated platform would not have.
        btc909
        • 9 Months Ago
        @sebringc5
        It's the same Delta II platform sebringc5.
      icemilkcoffee
      • 9 Months Ago
      Please make it more cohesive looking than the current car, which is a mish-mash of mismatched colors and textures.
      MONTEGOD7SS
      • 9 Months Ago
      I still think this is the future. Unlimited range for trips, a decent range for everyday driving full-electric, and a Hell of a lot cheaper than a Tesla. Trains have used generator based diesel-electric for years, and it's a great system because the generator could be gas, diesel, LPG, or a fuel cell. I would gladly drive a Volt everyday.
        carboy55
        • 9 Months Ago
        @MONTEGOD7SS
        Combination technologies are stair steps. The Volt has an internal combustion engine, and all the maintenance and replacement costs that go with it. The Tesla, LEAF and true BEVs are the future... until Fuel Cell Technology is perfected, made portable and safe, at which time the same flat earthers who have bashed EVs mercilessly will return to criticize them also.
          VL00
          • 9 Months Ago
          @carboy55
          "The Volt has an internal combustion engine, and all the maintenance and replacement costs that go with it." - that's a major misconception. I've driven 2,000 miles on gas (out of 22,000 miles) after 28 months. One oil change, at 24 months. That's the maintenance. What is there to maintain? Air filter? It'll take 10 years for me to hit 10k miles on gas. Spark plugs? They last 100k miles, it'll take me 100 years to drive that far on gas. What else is there to maintain??
        yonomo200
        • 9 Months Ago
        @MONTEGOD7SS
        Is say this is now. Tesla is the future.
      VL00
      • 9 Months Ago
      You realize the hydrogen used at fueling stations is derived from fossil fuel production, and horrendously inefficient to produce otherwise, right?
      William J. Sisco
      • 9 Months Ago
      I beg to differ, I really feel Hydrogen Fuel Cell is the future, you can never get distance from EV's and, you still need to charge them with electric generated by fossil fuels. So, using current and future internal combustion motors combined with Hydrogen seems to be the real future
      Grendal
      • 9 Months Ago
      Now I'd just like GM to do some really good marketing with the car. Teaching your salespeople the strengths of the car will be very helpful. Sales should be a lot higher for a car with the really high customer satisfaction numbers that the Volt has.
        Jim1961
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Grendal
        Poor marketing of the Volt is another complaint I hear often but I just don't get it. I don't watch much television but I've seen literally hundreds of Volt ads online. Many of these ads were probably staring people right in the face on websites like this one as they expressed their disappointment for the lack of advertising.
          axiomatik
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Jim1961
          The quality of the ads and the education of the consumer is critical. What percentage of people think the Volt is just an EV with a 38 mile range, and thus inferior to the Leaf? What percentage of people think the Volt is just a hybrid that gets 37mpg, and thus inferior to the Prius? These are the people that need to be educated, because a large percentage of the population doesn't really understand how the Volt works.
          Grendal
          • 9 Months Ago
          @Jim1961
          The Volt is a very complex car for the uninformed. The strengths need to be pointed out in such a way to get a potential customer talking to someone who can interpret whether the car will be advantageous to them. From the outside the car looks pretty much like any other car. So my point is that a picture of the car just isn't going to cut it. If they are spending a lot on online advertising then that is wasted effort.
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