OK, but let's see how well Honda can control hydrogen refueling temperature in Houston or Buffalo. That's what some pessimists may be saying now that the Japanese automaker has installed a fast-fueling hydrogen station in the oh-so-temperate environs of Torrance, CA. That city is about 20 miles southwest of downtown Los Angeles and a sliver of it actually touches the Pacific Ocean, so we're not talking about wild swings in air temperature here.

Honda is calling its fast-refueling platform the MC Fill (we'd expect a lawsuit if it was McFill, even though that'd be clever) and says that filling up takes about 45 percent less time than the typical hydrogen-refueling station. That's because the system monitors the ambient temperature in order to speed up the process. There's more scientific stuff in there - for example, the fact that the MC name comes from the "two key values in a heat transfer equation- 'M' for mass and 'C' for specific heat" - but the long and the short of it is that a hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle can fill up in less than three minutes. That's pretty impressive, despite the distinct lack of vehicles needing to charge that fast today.

Honda unveiled its FCEV Concept vehicle at the Los Angeles Auto Show last November. The five-seat vehicle has a range of more than 300 miles, while its fuel-stack power density is about 60 percent higher than its previous version. The production version is due to arrive in the US in 2015. Check out Honda's press release below.
Show full PR text
Honda R&D Installs Advanced Fast-Fill Hydrogen Refueling Station

-- New station on Honda R&D Americas' Torrance, California campus built in anticipation of Honda's next-generation fuel cell electric vehicle, due in 2015
-- Honda-developed hydrogen refueling protocol significantly reduces fill time

TORRANCE, Calif., March 3, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Preparing for the 2015 introduction of the next Honda fuel cell-electric vehicle (FCEV), Honda R&D Americas has installed a state-of-the-art hydrogen refueling station on its Torrance, California campus. This advanced station will serve as a platform for demonstrating and validating the enhanced hydrogen fueling protocol developed by Honda, named the MC Fill. With the aim of standardizing this new protocol, Honda will make the new research station available to other automakers to further validate the MC Fill protocol's performance and functionality.

The MC Fill fast-fill protocol is designed for fuel systems that store hydrogen at a pressure of 700 bar (70MPa or 10,000 psi). This new fueling protocol reduces 700-bar fueling times by up to 45 percent versus comparable fueling protocols, and can complete most fills in less than three minutes under normal temperature conditions. The MC Fill more precisely monitors the dispenser outlet temperature and uses this information to calculate the shortest fueling time possible. This dynamic, fast-fill control not only provides FCEV customers with shorter fueling times, but it also allows the dispenser to continuously adjust to current temperature and other conditions which normally affect the refueling time.

Derived from two key values in a heat transfer equation-"M" for mass and "C" for specific heat-the MC Fill name refers to the heat capacity of the hydrogen storage system and represents the capability of the system to absorb the heat that is generated during fueling. The MC Fill protocol utilizes this value, as well as the dispenser outlet gas temperature and pressure, in its fill control logic.

"In order to meet customer expectations, hydrogen fuel cell-powered vehicles need driving ranges and fueling times comparable to conventional gasoline vehicles," said Steve Mathison, Senior Engineer at Honda R&D Americas, Inc. "This new fueling protocol will allow FCEV customers everywhere to realize short fueling times over a wide range of temperatures."

Honda has led the industry for nearly two decades in the development and deployment of fuel cell technology through extensive real world testing, including the first government fleet deployment and retail customer lease programs in the United States. Honda has also made significant technological advancements in fuel cell operation in both hot and sub-freezing temperatures and safety regulations, since the introduction of its first generation fuel cell vehicle, the FCX, in 2002. Honda launched its current fuel cell-electric vehicle, the FCX Clarity, in July 2008 as a real technological breakthrough in the areas of design, sedan packaging, assembly line manufacturing, and fuel cell stack size and efficiency, winning "World Green Car of the Year."

In November 2013, the new Honda FCEV Concept debuted at the Los Angeles International Auto Show, pointing the way to an all-new Honda fuel cell car launching in the U.S. and Japan in 2015 and later in Europe. Honda's next-generation fuel cell-electric vehicle will feature a fuel cell powertrain packaged completely in the engine room of the vehicle, allowing for efficiencies in cabin space as well as flexibility in the potential application of FC technology to multiple vehicle types in the future. The next-generation Honda FCEV is anticipated to have a driving range of more than 300 miles.

Honda Environmental Leadership
Honda is committed to further advancements in environmental technologies and the effort to improve fuel efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions from its products, including the 2014 Honda Accord Hybrid and Plug-In, the Fit EV, Civic Natural Gas and the Honda FCX Clarity fuel cell electric vehicle. Honda also has led the Union of Concerned Scientists' (UCS) rankings of overall vehicle environmental performance since 2000, and a Honda vehicle has been included on the list of America's greenest vehicles from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) for the past 16 years.
Photo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140303/LA74878
Logo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20100923/HONDALOGO
SOURCE American Honda Motor Co., Inc.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 78 Comments
      Letstakeawalk
      • 2 Months Ago
      Great, we finally have Joeviocoe's blessing to call this progress! " The private station incorporates many technology advancements and is being touted by Air Products as a model for how rapidly a hydrogen fueling station can be constructed at a site, and its related infrastructure can be placed into operation. Completion time at this new station from contract signing, through construction, and to final commissioning with hydrogen, was just seven months. “Our priority focus is always on safety. This new station, however, shows just how far we have come in our ability to put hydrogen fueling stations and other needed infrastructure into operation in an expedited manner, while complying with our safety mandate, by using a product-based approach. Our new fueling station model allows for replication, and going forward we believe we can accomplish fueling projects like this safely in even less time,” said Ed Kiczek, global business director - Hydrogen Energy Systems at Air Products. "
      Joeviocoe
      • 2 Months Ago
      Not the kind of 'progress' anybody is really needing. Just like the gimmick of drinking exhaust water in the desert of Death Valley... an answer to a question nobody asked. Instead, I want to know how a 250 mile FCV drove from LA to Death Valley in the first place. They needed a Hydrogen truck to support their little stunt.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 2 Months Ago
      Copy/pasta: RICHMOND, Calif.-- AltCar Expo, the nation’s leading forum for green car ride and drive, public education and demonstration of the latest green technology vehicles, will take place on Friday and Saturday, March 14 – 15, 2014, from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., at Craneway Pavilion in Richmond, CA. Showcasing the area’s largest selection of electric, hydrogen, natural gas, propane and hybrid vehicles in one location with accompanying rebate and infrastructure information, the AltCar Expo is free and open to the public. AltCar is pleased to provide the first public opportunity to test drive the Honda FCX Clarity in Northern California. Initially introduced in Southern California, the Honda FCX Clarity is a sleekly styled hydrogen fuel cell powered sedan. Propelled by an electric motor that runs on electricity generated in a fuel cell, the Honda FCX Clarity, as with other fuel cell vehicles, only emits water. Bay Area residents will also have an opportunity hear from real owners at the Owners Panel lecture on Saturday, March 15 at 12 p.m. Cars on display March 14-15 include: (BOLD=CARS AVAILABLE FOR RIDE & DRIVE) Ford CMAX Energi Ford Escape EcoBoost Ford F-150 CNG Ford Fusion Energi Ford Focus Electric Honda Civic NGV Honda FCX Clarity Honda Accord Hybrid Electric Plug-In Honda Fit EV Hyundai Tucson Fuel Cell Mercedes-Benz B-Class F-Cell Motiv/Trans Tech SST-e Type A School Bus Nissan Leaf smart electric drive Toyota FCHV-adv Via Motors VTrux eREV Silverado ZEROTRUCK The Bay Area currently boasts the nation’s highest percentage of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles, and is home to 12 fuel cell powered public buses­–the largest concentration of fuel cell buses in the nation. California currently has nine public hydrogen fueling stations with 19 more set to open by 2015 and at least 100 in the coming years. Many of those stations will be located in the San Francisco Bay area. The AltCar Conference is sponsored by the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, American Honda Motor Co., PG&E, Nissan, The California Fuel Cell Partnership, Ford, Mercedes-Benz, smart, City of Richmond, Plug-In Electric Vehicle Collaborative, the Association of Bay Area Governments, San Francisco Clean Cities, East Bay Clean Cities, Clean Cities Silicon Valley and other partners.
      kulanihakoi
      • 2 Months Ago
      Sharif and Amand want to know the location of this storage vessel
        Marco Polo
        • 2 Months Ago
        @kulanihakoi
        @ kulanihakoi Never mind potential foreign terrorists, most acts of terrorism in the US have been committed by local misanthropes, with widely diverse crazy objectives. The H2 stations wouldn't make very good terror targets. There are so many easier, and more spectacular targets available
        Edge
        • 2 Months Ago
        @kulanihakoi
        Probably the same place gas stations store their gas tanks.
      Ryan
      • 2 Months Ago
      Maybe Honda will make a plug-in hybrid with an H2 fuel cell instead of a gasoline tank. But, you can still plug it in at home to go on most trips. It is just the long distance ones where this would be better than waiting 3-6 hours for your Leaf to refill 80-100 more miles.
        Doug
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Ryan
        If you aren't filling up often, then the range extender might as well be gasoline. How are you going to do a long distance trip with hydrogen if there is no place to refuel?
        Joeviocoe
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Ryan
        For a range extender that is used very rarely .... use an infrastructure that is established. Because the uncertainty of when and where you might need to refuel, is NOT conducive to a sparsely available resource like Hydrogen.
      2 wheeled menace
      • 1 Year Ago
      Geez. That's a lot of equipment there just to fuel one car at a time.
        Letstakeawalk
        • 2 Months Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        Not really meant for large-scale fueling anything. Just proof-of-concept of the pumps themselves, maybe the tech will trickle into other station designs. Yawn.
        eric
        • 2 Months Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        I wonder how many public level 2 or DC fast chargers could be build for the cost of this monstrosity.
          JakeY
          • 2 Months Ago
          @eric
          @theflew Probably one or two at the most. The limiter for hydrogen stations is not the pump but rather the storage and/or generation. Hydrogen stations today can only service about 20-25 cars a day (~100kg/day).
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Months Ago
          @eric
          ... because current refueling stations are demonstration stations, and only need to supply a small fleet. There's no technical reason why hydrogen station generation/storage/dispensing equipment couldn't be scaled up to meet demand.
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Months Ago
          @eric
          A typical Supercharging station (with 5 stalls)... could service about 125-150 EVs per day. 24 hours per day, 1 hour per EV, 5 stalls
          theflew
          • 2 Months Ago
          @eric
          I wonder how many DC chargers would be necessary to match the number of vehicles this could fill in a day.
        Joeviocoe
        • 2 Months Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        --"maybe the tech will trickle into other station designs." I think the technology is more likely to find its way into SpaceX rocket refueling in Hawthorne, CA.... than be a significant part of a Hydrogen Fueling infrastructure.
        Aaron
        • 2 Months Ago
        @2 wheeled menace
        That's exactly what I was thinking. I look at my tiny EVSE at home, then look at this monstrosity and wonder how is this better? It sure ain't cheaper.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 2 Months Ago
      " The superchargers are only for rare long distance drive so you don't need many of them and they are rarely used."* *statement not valid in CA
      Joeviocoe
      • 2 Months Ago
      From an engineering perspective, sure, this is progress towards better engineering. From an environmental and economic perspective (which engineers may or may not even be considering) Hydrogen is a wasteful use of resources to pursue.
      lad
      • 2 Months Ago
      Been trying to figure out why Toyota and Honda are so hell-bent on building fuel cell vehicles instead of BEVs, especially when Tesla recommends against fuel cells. The only thing I can come up with is Hydrogen is created by reforming Natural gas and right now the natural gas industry is booming. Gotta be a tie in here somewhere between Big Auto and Big Oil/Big Gas because the well to wheels pollution and cost is still much higher using fuel cells than batteries. Additionally, it is troubling to see the amounts of tax money that has been channelled into Hydrogen research over the decades with the same poor results. As yet Electrolysis is still too expensive and reforming gas/oil for hydrogen is still too dirty. And, carrying high pressure hydrogen in a car is still dangerous. And, Fuel Cells are still too expensive and inefficient. Fuel cells make no sense especially when you consider you can charge batteries directly from solar panels.
        goodoldgorr
        • 2 Months Ago
        @lad
        All in all hydrogen costs are lower then batteries. A tesla with 230 miles range cost 90 000$ and need costly supercharger network and recharging take up to 6 hours to half an hour with a supercharger. A fuelcell car with 300 miles range cost 50 000$ and fill up in 3 minutes. The durability of a fuelcell car is 25 years without maintenance and all the components can be recycled. The durability of a tesla is 25 years for the car but the battery should last 10 years max approx. and is costly to replace. Ordinary peoples do not like to recharge and almost 60% of car drivers do not have a place to recharge. When there will be a hydrogen infrastructure 100% of hydrogen car owners will be able to fill-up in 3 minutes. Hydrogen gas is cheap and probably will be awarded subsidies from goverments to help fight pollution contrary to gasoline that is taxed because it is polluting.
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Months Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          Yet a FCV can get full credit, yet is stuck to only the Los Angeles area... while a Tesla can drive much farther using superchargers. Perhaps neither should be getting "extra" credit based on conditions of the Infrastructure. Let's get rid of any stipulations of "refuel time"
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Months Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          Typical.... exaggerate the cost of a current 230 mile Tesla to $90k. While citing a mythical future FCV. By the time a FCV is offered for sale, a 200 mile Model E will be less than $40K, and the FCV will START at $75k. The Model E will be able to use the Supercharger network for 40 min recharges, and even use 90 second swap stations. There will probably be more swap stations available than H2 stations too.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Months Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          Elon Musk previously stated swapping stations would happen in 2013. "Question: When will the first battery swap station be online? Answer: Expect the first station in California, in the fourth quarter of this year." http://green.autoblog.com/2013/06/21/tesla-answers-questions-about-battery-swap/
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Months Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          "So, it is really just an answer to Hydrogen folks like you, and other EV detractors who claim that everybody NEEDS full refueling within minutes." I'm pretty sure the reason for the battery swap is because Tesla needs it to get CARB credits. At the moment, they're getting full credits for something that their product can't actually do.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Months Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          So, just speculation then. Where will it be? Have the building permits been issued?
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Months Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          Every automaker gets delays. Delays are understandable, if they have a reputation of delivering eventually. 15 years for FCVs is not a "delay" http://youtu.be/n7X4TRBazvo?t=33m37s The first swap stations "we're planning on", "initially as a trial", "hopefully that should be up and running within the next few months", "we'll see what the level of customer demand", if high demand, Tesla will expand, if not, Tesla will keep it limited. Basically, Elon doesn't think they will be needed all that much as Superchargers get up to 135KW and batteries get a bit larger. So, it is really just an answer to Hydrogen folks like you, and other EV detractors who claim that everybody NEEDS full refueling within minutes. The point is, that as much as you hold this faster H2 fueling as "progress", it will soon be shown as unappealing at such a high cost. Tesla will likely be able to enable more "swap" miles on an EV, for a cheaper cost per station, than a high speed H2 station. Just as Superchargers have already enabled more zero emissions miles than all of the H2 stations in public use (and likely to soon surpass more than all H2 miles).
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Months Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          Well, yes, speculation... but since all talk about Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles are equally speculative... I thought I'd bring it up. Funny, how every mention of EV technology must be firmly grounded in reality (as in, has it been built yet)... while every mention of FCVs is about some speculated future. -------------------- Yes, Elon Musk has already said that Swap stations will co-locate with Supercharger stations. So Tesla has about 6 locations already on the list of possible locations. We will see this summer. I have more confidence in Tesla Motors, because they have a reputation of building the infrastructure they promise... while there are many examples of H2 stations that were planned and never happened, over 10 years worth of examples.
          Jon
          • 2 Months Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          "A fuelcell car with 300 miles range cost 50 000$ and fill up in 3 minutes." Thats great. Where can I buy that car? "almost 60% of car drivers do not have a place to recharge." So what you are saying is right now over 40% of people have a place to charge their electric car while 0% of people have a place to fuel their H2 vehicle. Interesting, thanks for pointing that out.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Months Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          I hadn't heard that the Model E will have a swapable battery. When does the first battery swap station open? Got a hard date?
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Months Ago
          @goodoldgorr
          Fuel cell stacks do suffer from voltage degradation similar to batteries. While batteries might have 80% capacity after a decade, FC stacks might lose 10% voltage during the same time frame. At that point, they need a service to replace the polymer membrane which divides the stack plates and transports the electrons.
        Letstakeawalk
        • 2 Months Ago
        @lad
        I really am saddened to continually read that the battery company's failure to produce better batteries is due to Big Oil's research into hydrogen. Why are the Battery Makers R&D programs so affected by what Big Oil does?
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          Automakers must demand battery tech. Otherwise battery makers only continue to make laptop/phone batteries. After all, it was not the battery makers that forced the development of the Li-Ion batteries.. the computer industry lead that march by demanding longer lasting, lighter batteries. Automakers must do the same, in large format automotive sizes.... and they are distracted by Hydrogen
      Dave D
      • 2 Months Ago
      I think MC Hammer should sue them as well.
      Spec
      • 1 Year Ago
      That is pretty impressive if they can completely fill a FCV tank in 3 minutes. The ones I've seen take more than 10 minutes.
      Letstakeawalk
      • 2 Months Ago
      Sign ups are still available for the 2014 Alternative Clean Transport Expo tours, although spots are filling up. Maybe one of our CA-based ABG'ers could get in - or FSM willing, ABG could send a reporter? "TOUR 2: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Tour Tuesday, May 6 | 8:00 to 11:30 a.m. Hydrogen fuel cell technology development is expected to grow dramatically over the coming years, as OEMs commit to offering product aimed at commercializing this sector in the near-term. This tour will highlight Southern California’s leadership in the deployment of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and hydrogen refueling infrastructure, and showcase the companies pushing fuel cell technology to the forefront of alternative fuel conversation. Join us for a trip to America’s first pipelined hydrogen fueling station, as well as a leading manufacturer of components for fuel cell, electric and hybrid medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. Site One: Shell Hydrogen Station The Shell Hydrogen Station located in Torrance is the world’s first pipeline hydrogen refueling station and sits on land owned by project partner Toyota. Open since 2011, this public access station fuels nearly 500 vehicles per month, including Toyota, Mercedes, Honda, and GM fuel cell electric vehicles. Hydrogen is delivered to this unique station via an industrial pipeline that is supplied by Air Products’ facility near the Port of Long Beach. With two 5,000 psi and two 10,000 psi dispensers, it’s the world’s first station where four hydrogen cars can fill up simultaneously. This station’s retail-like environment gives customers the same experience they would expect from a Shell petroleum station. Site Two: US Hybrid Founded in 1999, US Hybrid Corporation specializes in the design and manufacture of integrated power conversion components for fuel cell, electric and hybrid medium and heavy-duty vehicles and renewable energy systems. The company’s products have been used in more than eighteen OEM commercial vehicles worldwide. In January 2014, US Hybrid announced the execution of an agreement with United Technologies Corporation to commercialize the company’s Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell technologies. The tour of US Hybrid’s facility will showcase the company’s 28,000 square foot integration and validation facility in Torrance. A variety of hybrid, plug-in electric and fuel cell heavy-duty trucks, municipal vehicles and military projects will be on display during the tour."
        Letstakeawalk
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        http://www.actexpo.com/tours.html#tour2 http://www.actexpo.com/register/register.html ABG editiors: "All-access pass includes NGV Global 2014 sessions, catered events, pre-conference tours, access to the expo hall and the ride & drive event, with the option to purchase Gala Dinner ticket(s) for Thursday, May 8. Pass also guarantees access to ACT Expo 2014 programming. Media registration is reserved for representatives of leading publications and websites dedicated to alternative fuel and clean technology vehicles. For information on joining us as a media partner for NGV Global, please contact Charlotte Medlock at 424.744.4482 or via email at Charlotte.Medlock@gladstein.org."
        Marco Polo
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        @ Letstakeawalk The US Hybrid Corporation, and it's founder, Dr. Gordon Goodarzi, are producing amazingly advanced technology, resulting in significant fuel savings and alternate energy applications in a wide range of vehicles. The environmental importance of research and technical advances from companies like US Hybrid Corporation is often overlooked in contrast to the more glamorous achievements of companies like Tesla Motors. That's unfortunate, because both companies share a common goal to reduce the environmental impact of fossil fuel on the environment. Arguments and "warring" factions among advocates of alternate energy technologies, is unhelpful and counter-productive.
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Marco Polo
          That is because Tesla's achievements simply ARE more glamorous. They get news because they actually put products into the hands of everyday consumers. It doesn't matter what the "goal" of the company is... only the results. That is why nobody seems to know about Goodarzi.
        Joeviocoe
        • 2 Months Ago
        @Letstakeawalk
        Sure, I will go. Can you send me $800 for the ticket?
          Joeviocoe
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          It was a joke. All of that praising by LTAW... and he conveniently avoided the fact that this is an exclusive "tour" for industry members. I just thought people ought to know that this is not for John Q Public.
          Marco Polo
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          @ Joeviocoe Why do you expect LTAW to pay for your ticket ?
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          I was hoping ABG would take up the offer to get a free press pass.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 2 Months Ago
          @Joeviocoe
          "I just thought people ought to know that this is not for John Q Public." Yes, they are. It's just that John Q Public generally doesn't give a shiat, because they're not into the electrification of autos like we are. And here on ABG, there's quite a few people who are more than just "into" EVs. Anyone can go, if they pay the fee, and $600 really isn't that much for some people - like perhaps, a Tesla owner who can easily swing a $1200/month payment on a personal car. The media can go for free - and I was really targeting this post at the ABG editors who almost never take advantage of expos to gain first-hand knowledge. I participate in the webinars, which are free. Recordings of the webinars are free to watch. "All of that praising by LTAW..." I didn't praise anything - it was a simple cut and paste, with my own appeal to someone from ABG to participate. I'd have gone if I could, and happily posted my experience.
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