General Motors' problems with its recall of roughly 1.6-million vehicles continue to mount. Now that it has emerged that GM knew about the problem since at least 2004 but waited to recall vehicles until February 2014, regulators at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration have begun a much deeper investigation. NHTSA has sent a 27-page survey to GM that includes 107 questions about the timeline of what led up to the recall, and it has until April 3 to reply.

This isn't a simple, multiple-choice test. Automotive News believes that hundreds of pages could be required to answer some of the queries. NHTSA says that it is still investigating GM's response to the recall. "We are a data-driven organization, and we will take whatever action is appropriate based on where our findings lead us," said NHTSA in a statement on its website. If found liable, the automaker could face a fine as high as $35 million and even possible criminal charges, according to Bloomberg.

NHTSA's questions include a detailed explanation of GM's examination process; how it will improve the process; why a planned redesign of the cars' key in 2005 wasn't implemented; and specific data on each complaint it received. According to Bloomberg, NHTSA also has records that show the company had a meeting with regulators to discuss the airbag failure in a Chevrolet Cobalt in 2007.

New GM CEO Mary Barra has also hired an outside law firm to conduct an independent investigation about what happened. It will include questioning company employees who were involved with the process from the start. The recall stems from faulty ignition switches that shut off the car while driving, and if it occurs the airbags deactivate. Thirteen deaths and 23 crashes have been caused by the problem, according to Bloomberg. If you would like to peruse NHTSA's entire questionnaire for GM, it can be viewed here.


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  • 89 Comments
      sp33dklz
      • 9 Months Ago
      I am always happy to watch GM suffer. Then even more entertained by the rednecks that continue to buy their crap afterwards. Blows my mind.
      1454
      • 9 Months Ago
      Sounds like it was a great idea to bailout this company. Clearly that worked out so well.
      Aurio Salimonne
      • 9 Months Ago
      You paid for junk,you get junk.......look how many are on the road today?,even brand new suburban at 36k have a crack dashboard and was build in Mexico,dash supply by America,and UAU have a sticker on the door jam that reads build with pride?
      Radioactive Flea
      • 9 Months Ago
      Who cares. Only poor people buy Cobalts. You pay for what you get.
      normc32
      • 9 Months Ago
      NASA wasn't given all of the code. Plus used a different metric to examine the code. Toyota got caught with poorly writen ecu code and people died. They just recalled more last week to have the ecu reflashed. Toyota owners are beta testers: http://www.safetyresearch.net/2013/11/07/toyota-unintended-acceleration-and-the-big-bowl-of-spaghetti-code/
      avinash Machado
      • 9 Months Ago
      So many skeletons in the closet.
        the.fog
        • 9 Months Ago
        @avinash Machado
        Not really.... 1) Name other scandals 2) Pretty much any dirt GM has is immediately leveraged by the media to try to destroy the company. Skeletons aren't allowed to live in the closet.
      Douglas Scyphers
      • 9 Months Ago
      I LOVE MY CHEVY!
        normc32
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Douglas Scyphers
        You should! I think it is a dead heat for most recalls so far this year: http://m.automotive-fleet.com/news/186563/toyota-recalling-7k-highlanders-to-fix-seat-belt-anchorage
        Tariff The Imports
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Douglas Scyphers
        And with that you've shown that you're not all that bright.
      MARCOC
      • 9 Months Ago
      Wow you have a hard on for Toyota or what.
      normc32
      • 9 Months Ago
      Auto manufacturers have to maintain parts supply for so many years past last production date. I'm sure they are ramping up the supply line now and going the Delphi facility that made the less than specificed performance in said cars.
      tiger
      • 9 Months Ago
      "Thirteen deaths and 23 crashes have been caused by the problem, according to Bloomberg." I agree with the deaths, but the 23 crashes would have happened anyhow. These 23 cars had to crash in order to uncover the problem. Had the cars not crashed, well, you get the point. It should be illigal to carry anything more than a key fob and a house key or two in addition to the ignition key on your key ring. I've seen women pull their key chains out of their purses with a lifetime of heirlooms and momentos on their keychains. They own extra-large purses just to accomodate the key rings. If unreasonably heavy key rings are found to be the cause of the ignition switching off, then GM should NOT be heald accountable. I also tend to believe that most of these deaths may have occurred regardless of the airbags lack of deployment, especially the cars that had gone off the road. How many were the result of drunk drivers, excessive speeding, crossing the median into oncoming traffic? So many questions that need answered. Still, my heart goes out to the people that loose their lives due to these, or any type of accident.
        Gorgenapper
        • 9 Months Ago
        @tiger
        This would make a good case for push button start systems, the key never leaves your pocket or purse and idiots won't have the opportunity to hang a couple pounds of metal on the ignition switch. I have push button start on my MS3 and I used to think it was just a useless gimmick. Over time I've actually come to like it very much for the convenience factor, and it also removes the possibility (however improbable for me) that I'd forget my key in the car or drop it on the ground, into a storm drain, under my seat, etc. There is also a backup aux key in the fob, so I'd never need worry about the battery running out. I'd definitely try to get my next car with push button start based on my experience thus far.
        Card13
        • 9 Months Ago
        @tiger
        " ...the 23 crashes would have happened anyhow." No, they definitely would NOT have happened. The root of the issue is not that the airbags won't deploy, it's that the car shuts off. You lose power steering (the wheel could also lock), power brakes, and can no longer accelerate. Drunk driving, speeding, or whatever has nothing to do with it. These conditions could cause any average driver to crash.
      fran
      • 9 Months Ago
      @1454: normc32 is an anti-Toyota. And he even believes in every word written on Wikipedia. L.O.L
      carboy55
      • 9 Months Ago
      This could get very expensive and damaging for GM. You're going to see some sacrificial lamb resignations coming soon, but that's not going to make it any less painful for GM. 13 fatalities and a coverup is not cool.
        the.fog
        • 9 Months Ago
        @carboy55
        Highly doubtful... It's already falling out of the headlines.
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