Earlier this week, we told you that the Honda Insight was scheduled to get the axe – something that had been rumored for a long time. Now, Honda has officially confirmed that the Insight is being put out of our its misery. That's right, America's most affordable mass-produced hybrid will officially die after the 2014 model year, with production scheduled to end this summer. Honda says that, moving forward, it will focus its efforts on expanding its newer two-motor hybrid system found in the Accord. Of course, this news doesn't exactly give us much hope for the CR-Z hatchback's longevity, either. Scroll down for the official release.
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Honda Commits to the Expansion of Hybrid Vehicle Offerings in the U.S.
- Honda product strategy includes advancement of Earth Dreams™ Technology powertrains, including innovative two-motor hybrid system
- Strategy will include changes to existing lineup of environmental vehicles

TORRANCE, Calif., Feb. 28 – Honda is reinforcing its commitment to a clear product strategy focused on further advancing fuel-efficient and alternative-fuel vehicle technologies that are better aligned with customer needs and that strengthen the company's U.S. sales momentum.

Keyed to the continued rollout of a new lineup of Earth Dreams™ Technology engines, transmissions and electro-motive technologies, the strategy will be executed over the next three to four years and will include changes to the Honda lineup of advanced technology environmental vehicles, including the Honda Insight. The U.S. model Insight will be available at Honda dealerships nationwide through the end of the year, with production scheduled to end in summer 2014.

Honda's hybrid product direction in the U.S. will move forward with greater focus on expanded application of the innovative two-motor hybrid system. The two-motor system was introduced on the 2014 Accord Plug-In Hybrid and powers the EPA-rated 50 mpg city Accord Hybrid, which is the most fuel-efficient rating for a 5-passenger sedan in America.

"No manufacturer has more experience with electromotive technologies than Honda and we are committed to applying our expertise to a wide range of products in the coming years," said Michael Accavitti, senior vice president of auto operations at American Honda. "Our hybrid vehicle strategy will focus on new models aimed at delivering the class-leading fuel economy and performance our customers' desire in segments that represent significant growth opportunities."

The second generation Insight is the most affordable mass-produced hybrid vehicle on the market with a MSRP starting at $18,7251, and an EPA fuel economy ratings of 41/44/42 city/highway/combined2. It was introduced in the spring of 2009 and offered a unique blend of fuel-efficient hybrid performance, 5-door hatchback practicality, top safety ratings and a host of user-friendly features, including the first application of the Honda-exclusive ECO Assist™, a sophisticated feedback system that uses an adaptive color display to indicate overall driving efficiency. Long recognized as an affordable and practical hybrid vehicle choice for customers, the Insight was named a 'Greenest Vehicle' by the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) for four consecutive years and a 'Top Choice' by Edmunds.com.


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  • 66 Comments
      Nine Elements
      • 9 Months Ago
      If they could just get the CR-Z's curb weight down to 2000 lbs...
        zoom_zoom_zoom
        • 9 Months Ago
        @Nine Elements
        Did you see the new CR-Z with CFP body work shown at the tokyo motor show?
      Patrick
      • 9 Months Ago
      Shame. Makes me miss the S2000. By now they could have a hybrid combo system in it for funnsies
      Daryoush Shabahang
      • 9 Months Ago
      Say what you will about the Insight, but I've driven it a lot and it's a great car - my only two complaints about it are a) the interior quality and b) the car moves around a lot during high winds.
      imtoomuch1
      • 9 Months Ago
      More proof that nobody cares about hybrids except hippies and clueless customers that are pursuaded into these money pits.
      shaan
      • 9 Months Ago
      i love mine, doesnt drive like a marshmellow and cost me something like 7k less than a prius
      george
      • 9 Months Ago
      Good. Good riddens. Nobody cares.
      2 wheeled menace
      • 9 Months Ago
      That's fine. Don't update the engine to the modern atkinson cycle, transmissionless setup in the new Honda Accord Hybrid. You wouldn't want to compete with Toyota's Prius and make money doing so. That's not what you're here to do as a business, yes? Continue blowing money on R&D in other areas that will never pay off. That's the clear path to success.
      superchan7
      • 9 Months Ago
      Good riddance. Hybrid buyers usually aren't bottom-of-the-barrel bargain monkeys. At $2000 cheaper than a Prius, the Insight stood no chance being slower, less efficient, smaller, less comfortable and less feature-equipped. The CR-Z has potential if Honda is willing to swap out the crappy IMA powertrain with something that actually hauls.
        SteveG
        • 9 Months Ago
        @superchan7
        $2000? The base prius is over $24,000. The base Insight was $18,000. I think you mean $6000. Good luck finding a base Prius, the base insight was actually available.
        CoolWaters
        • 9 Months Ago
        @superchan7
        All sports cars are now applying KERS systems to become hybrids. The CR-Z was only first. The electric motor needs to be larger, with a current generation battery, that's all.
          skierpage
          • 9 Months Ago
          @CoolWaters
          As I said elsewhere, it's dependent on battery chemistry. What's the smallest pack size that can deliver, say, 250 kW (335 horsepower!) for 10 seconds? That's currently Model S-sized, but as batteries improve, more sports cars will add electric for performance (and mpg). But conventional car makers have to hurry because the same improvements will make the gasoline engine redundant for many buyers. Tesla could already make a serious Subaru/Scion BRZ/FR-S competitor with a 40 kW·h pack.
          carguy1701
          • 9 Months Ago
          @CoolWaters
          No they aren't. P1, LaFerrari, and 918 are hypercars with price tags to match.
      Frisky_Dingo
      • 9 Months Ago
      Good riddance.
      Andre Neves
      • 9 Months Ago
      I guess nobody had any insight into its future demise.
      CoolWaters
      • 9 Months Ago
      It get's 40 mpg almost always, and 48-52 on the highway on long cruises. So, it's real world mileage was pretty good. You can throw it around corners pretty well. The rear seats don't have headroom for 6 feet passengers, that's why it sells well in Japan, they're not tall. The interior is spartan. The front seat bottom has a strange angle, and the ride could be better, much better. But, it's still a BEST BUY for getting a Hybrid and ROI: Return on your Investment. As the reliability is extremely good, it saves you money in Not Needing any Repairs, ever. And as it's a sporty ride, it's fun to drive. But from day 1 it was vilified in the press, far more then it deserved. It's never lived DOWN to the reputation it got.
      William
      • 9 Months Ago
      Take out all the astounding weight of the electronic components and batteries and put a small diesel in it. CRZ, too. CRZ with a small diesel would be nice. Govern it down to the poor level of performance of the Insight or Prius and you'd get 80 mpg, maybe more.
        CoolWaters
        • 9 Months Ago
        @William
        Exactly. All the big sports cars are planning to bring over KERS systems, and convert them to hybrids. Why should Honda go backwards.
        skierpage
        • 9 Months Ago
        @William
        100 pounds of batteries is "astounding weight"? You're easily astounded. Diesel engines have their own weight penalty, comparable to hybrid. If companies could make 80mpg EPA diesels, they would. They don't because it can't be done. The low-powered "Blu*" diesels getting 70 mpg on the easier European cycle are all mild hybrids with stop-start. When and if they develop faster recharge-discharge battery chemistry (or the fabled ultra capacitors), the performance model of every car will be the high-mpg hybrid version. Even the Prius' wimpy 1 kWh battery could provide 400 horsepower for 10 seconds if it could discharge that quickly. Currently you only get the monstrous power delivery from a big heavy battery pack (thus Tesla Model S), but the weight/power tradeoff will continue to improve.
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