Sometimes the best ideas come from fresh eyes, and a group of design students from Istituto Europeo di Design – better known as IED – are out to prove that sentiment with this striking Hyundai PassoCorto concept. This two-seat thesis project of the Master of Arts in Transportation Design program for the Turin, Italy school will be officially unveiled at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show beginning March 4.

The concept is said to be 161 inches long, 74 inches wide and 45.7 inches tall. It rides on a 96.5-inch wheelbase, which makes sense since passo corto means "short wheelbase" in Italian. The engine is tipped to be a mid-mounted, twin-turbo, 1.6-liter four-cylinder pumping out 266 horsepower. Judging by these images, we think the design looks fantastic, with all those sharp lines and creases drawing to a point in the rear. It shows a wonderful balance of being wild enough to draw attention, yet it almost looks realistic enough for the road.

The styling comes from 16 IED students coordinated by Luca Borgogno, lead designer for fabled Italian design house Pininfarina. The students were given a design brief by Hyundai to create a vehicle aimed at young, connected people like them. All of the students submitted a proposal, and two were selected to be merged together in a final look. The entire class contributed to bringing the design to full scale. Scroll down to get the full scoop on the little sports car concept.

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PassoCorto: a two-seater sports car at Geneva Motor Show

The concept car realized by the Master in Transportation Design in collaboration with the Hyundai Design Center Europe will be revealed in world preview.

PassoCorto, the tenth full scale model created by Istituto Europeo di Design of Turin, is a sports car, extremely compact in size. Designed by the Master in Transportation Design – work experience IED Turin – a.y. 2012/13 in collaboration with Hyundai, it will be revealed in world preview at the 84th International Geneva Motor Show (press conference: 4th March 2014 at 4 p.m. – hall 5, stand 5041).

The Korean car manufacturer gave to the Institute a design brief with its target potential customers being young people, who are always connected, those of 2.0, known as generation Y. This very target market also includes the students on the Master's asked by Hyundai to draw and design the car that would be top of their list for buying and driving.

It is time of PassoCorto, created in a year – 2014 – that, in addition to the tenth full scale model, will also see the Institute celebrate 20 years of the Transportation Design course and 25 years of activity in the region.

PassoCorto is the work of sixteen students on the Master's course coordinated by Luca Borgogno, Lead Designer Pininfarina. The concept is the result of a process marked by various assessment stages, simulating a real working situation. All the students submitted their own proposal; the two that were best able to respond to the initial brief were selected and "merged" together into the final version which combines approximately 70 of the other. The entire class in fact created a core working team in order to create a well-integrated model of the two final versions in line with the concepts expressed by the scale models, completing as a group the full scale concept.

The Istituto Europeo di Design would like to thank Hyundai Design Center Europe for the fruitful collaboration that is taken forward so passionately.

Special Thanks: Adobe

Technical Sponsor: Goodyear, Model Resine and NCS – New Cast Services

PassoCorto was constructed by: Cecomp

The Istituto Europeo di Design's stand was created thanks to the collaboration of: Abet Laminati and Interfiere

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PREVIEW >> IED Turin presents at Geneva the Hyundai PassoCorto

Istituto Europeo di Design presents the concept created by the Master in Transportation Design in collaboration with the Hyundai Design Center Europe

At the 84th Geneva International Motor Show (6th – 16th March 2014 – hall 5, stand 5041) will be unveiled as a world premiere the concept car PassoCorto, the tenth full-scale model realized by Istituto Europeo di Design of Turin in collaboration with the Hyundai Design Center Europe, the thesis project of the Master of Arts in Transportation Design – work experience a.y '12/13.

PassoCorto (length 4100mm – width 1880mm – height 1160mm – wheelbase 2450mm) is a 2 seater rear engine sports car, powered by the a 4 cylinder bi-turbo engine (1600 cc) with 270 CV. The concept car is targeted at young customers. The students of the Master course acted as real designers in the automotive field and potential buyers of their own project.

PassoCorto is the work of the sixteen students of the Master coordinated by car designer Luca Borgogno Lead Designer Pininfarina.



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  • 25 Comments
      vassyg16
      • 10 Months Ago
      They may need a rethink on the whole "IED" name...
      Arturo Rios Jr.
      • 10 Months Ago
      I know where I have seen this, at the Hotwheels section at Walmart* live better.
      graphikzking
      • 10 Months Ago
      I'm no design guy so I know this is better than I could come up with from scratch on my own, but it just doesn't look great to me. Something about the front end being too big for the cabin? This car is about the same size as an Audi TT but yet the proportions just look a little off. Kind of reminds me of when they take a car (MR2 Spyder or similar) and put on a Ferrari body kit or something. It's a great beginning especially for a student and would be uber proud if my kid designed this! So kuddos and this kid will only get better and HOPEFULLY he continues to use some of the cues he did on this car because it could be something special!
        MotionDesigner
        • 10 Months Ago
        @graphikzking
        At least you admit you're not a design guy, unlike these other armchair critics who are criticizing work done by STUDENTS (very classy), and probably don't have a clue about design and can't sketch a car if their lives depended on it. That said, as far as proportions go, the placement of the engine and also drivetrain make all the difference. So in that regard, you really can't compare this to an Audi TT, which has a transverse mounted engine that sits in the front, and the drivetrain is AWD but based on a FWD biased platform. This Hyundai concept has its engine mid-mounted, which completely changes the proportions. For example, compare a Ferrari 458 to a C7 Corvette. Both are roughly the same size, yet their proportion and stance are completely different due to the engine placement.
          MotionDesigner
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MotionDesigner
          No you don't need to be a professional to have an opinion. But an amateur's opinion weighed next to a professional's opinion wouldn't hold as much weight now would it. That's not to say it's not as valuable, but it just doesn't hold as much weight. But what I really find disgusting is how so many people are ripping work that is done by students. Easy to sit behind a keyboard and rip apart work that was done by young aspiring designers, and also very cowardly.
          Big Rocket
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MotionDesigner
          @MotionDesigner: 1. It is completely elitist and arrogant to think a professional's opinions matter more than those who do not put on the same rose-colored lenses. That better-than-thou attitude is what I find disgusting. 2. Young, aspiring designers need to have their works criticized when their works fall short of expectations. If you feed them unconditional praise, that is a lot more cruel and detrimental to their career aspirations. Man up or get out.
          Big Rocket
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MotionDesigner
          I feel sorry and disgust for you if, in your utter arrogance, anyone who disagrees with you is a "fool", a "troll", a "loser", those were your words, not mine. If you really were the expert in design as you claim to be, and you seem to think a mere college education is enough to elevate you to that expert level, then perhaps you should be more familiar with the term, "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder." But no, just because you paid an institution a bunch of money over the course of a few years to brainwash you and put blinders on you, then somehow, your eyes as the beholder are suddenly more valid than other beholders' eyes. That's complete and utter nonsense. Next time you order a piece of steak medium rare, and it comes out of the kitchen well done, don't bother to complain to the server, because the chef might have a culinary degree from some no-name community college. That's simple logic, and you're the one who is stubbornly refusing to accept it. And about that thing called criticism. Whether you are a design professional or a design student, it is your job to improve your art form based on feedback, whether that feedback is sugar-coated or whether it is brutally honest. Not everyone on Autoblog is going to kiss up to your work and tell you how awesome you are, if your work stinks. I've been on Autoblog long enough to remember a few of your previous posts, like when you claimed some new car design looked like something you had done before, and you provided a link to your portfolio. And you know what, your work reeked of amateur quality, and I was surprised you were shameless enough to show it on the Internet. If you can deal with this brutally honest criticism, then maybe it will inspire you to take your art form to the next level. But if you hide behind your expensive college degree and you only want to take sugar-coated feedback from college professors whose salaries are funded by your expensive tuition, then maybe you should look for a new line of work. Like I said before, grow some balls, or get out.
          Big Rocket
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MotionDesigner
          @MotionDesigner: And why are armchair critics' voices not as valuable as those who have been indoctrinated by a 4-year degree of groupthink and circle jerk? You don't need to be a movie director to know when a Hollywood movie is awful, you don't need to be an Iron Chef to know when food is awful, and you certainly don't need to be a design guy to know when a car looks awful. Respect is earned, not given to those who claim to know better.
          MotionDesigner
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MotionDesigner
          Sounds like you're trying to look for reasons to justify whatever lack of intelligence you have in any given subject. There is a reason why schools were invented. You're a fool to think that someone who is in a professional field of work does not have a more comprehensive knowledge of his or her field of study than somebody with no experience and is looking at things from the sidelines. And you try to justify that by accusing professionals or degree holders as being "elitist or arrogant". Don't be so naive and sensitive. This is not some "better than though" attitude I'm putting on. It's simple logic. And learn to comprehend what I wrote. I said everybody's opinion is valuable (there now, does that make you feel better?), but a professional's opinion would hold more weight if they're obviously more knowledgable about the subject. If you simply can't understand that (or refuse to acknowledge it) then there's nothing I can do for you. You're just too sensitive and stubborn. Also, I never said students should not be faced with any criticism. Criticism is one of the most important aspects of improving as a designer. When I was a student I only chose the instructors that were the hardest and most critical, even if it meant they were not so nice. But there's a difference between "constructive criticism" and armchair trolls throwing out one-liner insults behind their keyboard. Constructive criticism provides insight on the subject matter and solutions to help improve the work. Sorry but I don't see that in these comments. Here's what I see: "Looks like a car for a no name low budget racing game….." "Holy hell that thing is hideous." "I know where I have seen this, at the Hotwheels section at Walmart* live better." "Hey look, a knockoff P1 front." Now tell me how those comments promote anything that is constructive or helpful in any way shape or form. All I see are a bunch of losers who I presume are adults (though I could be wrong) with nothing better to do than try to anonymously insult students' work not for the sake of helping them improve (as you suggest), but merely for the sake of being cowardly trolls.
          Big Rocket
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MotionDesigner
          You thought "Big Rocket" stood for some allusion to phallus size. That was the only reason I brought up the Rorschach test, to show how misguided you were. You thought you had a superior education compared to mine. That was the only reason I brought up my Engineering college degree to trump you Art college degree. And to inject reality into your inflated sense of self worth, I brought up the fact engineers typically earn more than industrial designers. That's not a presumption, that's a factual labor statistic, I earn more than you, don't be jelly, deal with it. This whole thing started because you were, and still are, conceited enough to think someone who has gone through a formal art school has a more valuable opinion than those who haven't, that's why schools were invented. That's an art snob. My issue isn't with art majors or industrial designers, my disgust is directed at art snobs like yourself. Yes, because you know more about art than an art school dropout like Picasso. Yes, you really got the better of me with that one, and all the other nonsense you spouted as a so-called art expert. So, which museum can I go to for a display of your artwork? Because I'm sure your masterpieces would make Picasso's pale in comparison, since you had a formal art education and Picasso dropped out, am I right? How many millions of dollars did your last piece of artwork sell for? How much do you earn in a year? Still feeling high and mighty about your art degree?
          Big Rocket
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MotionDesigner
          There is a huge difference between medical science, which is absolute, and an art form such as design, which is in the eye of the beholder. You are an art snob, plain and simple. People who didn't go through the same art school brainwashing, you look down on their opinions as being less valuable. An art snob. If you never linked to your portfolio on Autoblog, then clearly I must be mistaken, and got you confused with some other holier-than-thou art snob with the same self-important attitudes about art. "Big Rocket" stems from my good old days of playing the videogame Quake 1, and my preference for the rocket launcher. Do you know what a Rorschach test is? The way you interpreted this ink blot called "Big Rocket" says more about you than the ink blot itself. And while I'm giving my origin story, I happen to be a college-educated, high-level engineer. I haven't met you in real life, but I'm pretty sure my college degree is fancier than yours, and my salary is higher than yours. And even with all that, I have been on the receiving end of very brutal criticisms, from non-engineers. Guess what? I didn't hide behind my college degree, I accepted their criticisms, I learned from my mistakes, and became better for it. I manned up. You should learn from that, instead of hiding behind your art degree. I think it is very telling that everyone believes in the phrase, "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder", except for those art snobs like you who have been completely brainwashed by a fancy college degree. And if you still stubbornly insist on the almighty importance of being an art professional, "there is a reason why schools exist", just remember: Picasso dropped out of art school. Maybe he beheld beauty with different eyes than yours.
          MotionDesigner
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MotionDesigner
          *sigh… I'm not gonna even bother reading past your first sentence. Honestly it's getting boring (it started once you began talking about your favorite weapon in Quake 1). This tit for tat pissing contest obviously means a lot more to you than it does to me. Whatever drivel you've spit up in your last attempt to one-up me, I'll let you keep it. You own it, it's yours :) So, I bestow to you the highly coveted award of Internet Pissing Contest Champion. This should give you the sense of fulfillment you've been so valiantly fighting for. You earned it buddy!
          MotionDesigner
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MotionDesigner
          Funny you're calling me a snob when you have this inflated hatred and preconceived notion of people who go to art/design schools. And then you go spouting off about rorschach tests, your "fancy high level" engineering degree (your words, not mine), and how you presume to think you have a higher salary than me, etc. Who's the snob? Furthermore, I'm not hiding behind anything. It was only after my 3rd reply - to your verbal attacks which instigated this to begin with - that I even mentioned I went to a college at all. You're just upset that every one of my retorts are getting the better of you, so you stoop down to making character presumptions of me i.e.. calling me art snob, brainwashed, holier than thou… If that makes you feel better buddy. This is what I said from the very beginning: don't be so sensitive. Sorry but what I see coming out of your last comment is the true snob in YOU. Seems like your every attempt to label me and put me down is a projection of what you feel about yourself. Oooh, how's that for snobbery? Good grief.
          MotionDesigner
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MotionDesigner
          Oh and btw, here's the elitist and snobby art grad speaking to you: There's a difference between "art" and "design". Art is a very wide generalized term. Design is something specific. And within Design there are even more categories ie. graphic design, fashion design, industrial design, product design, TRANSPORTATION design. Why don't you take a wild guess as to which one I studied and the field in which I currently work in. Play stupid all you want if it helps you feel better to ask me how many pieces of "artwork" did I sell. Yep, poor me, I'm a failed artist. My Green Period is not having such an impact in the haute art scene. Poor receptions in my gallery openings… oh well. /s
          Big Rocket
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MotionDesigner
          Please, that is the oldest trick in the book on the Internet. You ran out of excuses for your unjustifiable sense of superiority as a so-called professional, you spoke up for students who didn't ask you to defend them, your semantics were going nowhere, and when you were finally exposed as another armchair critic, you pulled that oldest trick: You pretended to be too "tired" to keep going. What was it I said earlier? Grow some balls or get out.
          MotionDesigner
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MotionDesigner
          Wow, I really nailed it on the head when I said you have a knack for making up presumptions about people didn't I. And look at you go! When did I ever allude to having a superior education compared to yours or to anybody else? Please point it out. "That was the only reason I brought up my Engineering degree to trump you Art college degree." Please define "trump" and in what context you use it. And then remind me who's the snob again? Thought so. This whole thing started because I told off a bunch of trolls who had nothing better to do than bash work that was done by students. And I thought that is low. Their comments hold no productive merits whatsoever, just a bunch of ARMCHAIR CRITICS who find pleasure in deriding student work for the sake of amusement, not constructive criticism. You came in to defend those fine people, and in doing so, it was you who started with the verbal attack against me by saying I'm "indoctrinated by a 4-year degree of groupthink and circle jerk." Where did that come from, cowboy? I didn't even mention I went to any school or had a degree at that time. But don't get mad that in my response to shut you up, I presented a logical and sound argument that you could only retort by using additional verbal attacks by way of presumptions against me ie. elitist, snobby, holier than thou, etc… Don't pit this on me buddy, you made your bed and now you don't want to sleep in it. I'm also confused that you flaunt this fancy engineering degree of yours (which totally trumps my art degree), yet you seem to have this mental barrier in reading comprehension. For the umpteenth time, I never said someone with a degree has an opinion that is more important than someone who doesn't. I said someone who is a professional… oh hell with it I'll just find what I wrote and quote it for you: "But an amateur's opinion weighed next to a professional's opinion wouldn't hold as much weight now would it. That's not to say it's not as valuable, but it just doesn't hold as much weight." And I repeat, "…learn to comprehend what I wrote. I said everybody's opinion is valuable (there now, does that make you feel better?), but a professional's opinion would hold more weight if they're obviously more knowledgable about the subject. If you simply can't understand that (or refuse to acknowledge it) then there's nothing I can do for you. You're just too sensitive and stubborn." End quote. Also the key word here is "professional", not "degree holder" or "college grad", but "professional". You keep babbling about Picasso, but you're missing the point. Yes there's a reason schools were invented, to make professionals and careers for people. I never said that is the one and only way. There are of course exceptions and not everyone has to graduate to become a professional. Oh and my quip about "Big Rocket" was really just a joke, as I even mentioned directly after I wrote it. But I didn't realize the actual meaning behind it would be as boring as it is.
          Big Rocket
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MotionDesigner
          You know what they say about actions speaking louder than words? The fact that you would even come in and protest against brutal honesty, just because you disagree with them and you want others to shut up because you consider yourself a so-called professional. And if you want to play semantics, because everyone else who doesn't play that game must have issues with reading comprehension: a professional, an expert, whatever you call it, has an opinion more high and mighty in something as inexact and as emotional as art? Does someone need professional training to learn emotion? Art, and automotive industrial design for that matter, at its highest form is supposed to evoke an emotional reaction, but of course, a professional's emotion is more valuable, right? When you go off telling other people they are wrong because you think they are being harsh, because you disagree with them, and because somehow your expert opinion means more, that makes you a snob. Funny how you tried to use a doctor, who specializes in an exact medical science, as an example to uphold the value of professional art opinions. And yeah, I gave you the benefit of doubt, and thought you had some art or industrial design degree to stand on. It turned out you had a transportation design degree, which pretty much makes you just another armchair critic, trying to tell other armchair critics their opinions are invalid, or less valid. Presumptuous? What about the guy who thinks students need to be coddled, that criticisms of their work must be sugarcoated, that being brutally honest on an anonymous Internet forum is bad for the students' career growth? Do you speak for all art and industrial design students now? Yeah, that's totally not presumptuous at all. /supersarcasm
          MotionDesigner
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MotionDesigner
          When did I ever say "anyone who disagrees with me is a fool, troll, or loser?" Please point that out. I DID say that anyone who sits behind their keyboard and throws out one-liner insults with no constructive merit behind them whatsoever, simply for the sake of bashing work that was done by students nonetheless, are trolls and losers. And yes, I stand by that comment. You seem to have a knack for putting words in my mouth. I never said students should be coddled, kissed up to, or sugar-coated. Your tendency to only look at things in black and white, absolute extremes, only validates your stubbornness and inability to think beyond the surface. I also said YOU are a fool if you simply don't acknowledge that someone with a proper educational background in a specific field of work is most likely going to have more knowledge in that field of study compared to someone who is not as knowledgable in that field of study. Here's a clear cut example: DOCTORS. If someone on a plane becomes sick, does the stewardess say "Is there a plumber on this plane?" Of course not, the first person she'll look for is a doctor. That is simple logic. Your constant attempt to paint me as some sort of "holier-than-thou" snob only reasserts this notion that you clearly have some misguided complex about people who go to college and get a degree. It's actually quite ridiculous how you're painting an entire group of people as money spending brainwashed snobs simply because they went to a college or university. Do you know how absurd you sound? Of course you don't. Just don't project your deep rooted insecurities onto me or anyone else who has a degree. Also, what the hell are you talking about in your last statement? Sorry buddy but you're completely wrong and/or mistaken. I've been on AB for a few years now but never once did I ever claim that a new car design looked like something I did. Nor did I ever post any link to my own work. I'd ask you to provide proof or a link, but it's pointless because I know for a fact it doesn't exist. You've either clearly mistaken me for someone else or you're simply making this up, either way you're wrong. But back to the topic, all you've shown me is you have some insecurity complex with schools, and it's projected through your sensitivity and stubbornness. I think it's you who needs to man up and grow some balls. Why am I not surprised your name is Big Rocket… compensating for something? I know, that was a petty shot, but I'm playing at your level now.
      Fatima Daniela Pinho
      • 10 Months Ago
      I feel like I've seen this car before. Don't get me wrong, it looks amazing.
      miketim1
      • 10 Months Ago
      Looks like a car for a no name low budget racing game.....
      IBx27
      • 10 Months Ago
      Hey look, a knockoff P1 front.
      truewhiteboy
      • 10 Months Ago
      It's nice, but will never be made due to crash test restrictions
      Jaybird248
      • 10 Months Ago
      Looks like kind of a knockoff of the Toyota FT-1, but without the subtleties of that design. But hey, they're kids. They'll learn.
      MotionDesigner
      • 10 Months Ago
      IED is a strange school. Students pay a lot of money to go to that school, but if their proposed design is not chosen they are relegated to be a mere helper for another student's design? I know that's how things work in the professional field, but this is still school, and the students are paying, not getting paid, to do their own projects. Also why does it take 16 students to help with the final design? It's an awesome design, but these are projects that just ONE student from any other school like Art Center could do.
      Mr. Meaner
      • 10 Months Ago
      Looks similar to the Lamborghini Egoista concept. That, by no means is an insult.
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