The diesel, half-ton pickup has long been a Holy Grail to many truck fans, largely because of its potential to achieve both high payload and great fuel economy. Strange, then, that auto companies have seemingly been slow to react. However, Chrysler is finally wading into the pool for the 2014 model year with a version of its Ram 1500 pickup, and early claimed returns are showing the advantage of being first on the market. The Auburn Hills automaker has just revealed that its initial allocation of 8,000 EcoDiesel trucks has been filled by dealers in just three days.

That flood of orders came from February 7-10, and that strong surge of interest apparently amounts to a new Ram record for the number of customer orders placed for a vehicle in such a short period of time. In fact, EcoDiesel models accounted for over half of Ram 1500 orders over that period, despite the fact that the diesel option costs several thousand dollars more than a comparable gasoline-engined model. That impressive total did not come entirely as a shock to Ram officials, however: "We knew customers have been asking for it," Nick Cappa, Ram Truck communications officer, tells Autoblog.

The 2014 Ram 1500 with its 3.0-liter EcoDiesel V6 and standard eight-speed TorqueFlight automatic makes 240 horsepower and 420 pound-feet – a combination good for 9,200 pounds of towing. Despite that pulling power, its fuel economy is rated at 28 miles per gallon highway (the best among trucks in its class), 20 mpg city and 23 mpg combined. Four-wheel drive variants gives up a single mpg in all categories.

Production of 2014 model-year trucks began in February, and shipments start in March. Ram expects EcoDiesel models to account for 10-15 percent of 1500-series orders this year. Another 8,000 units are allocated for March production, and according to Cappa, Ram has room to ramp up production if needed. In case you were wondering, you're not out of luck if you still want to get in on the first allocation of diesels. Individual customer orders take priority over dealers in Ram's computer system, so each one means fewer truck sitting on dealer lots. Scroll down for the full details.
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2014 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel Orders Top More Than 8,000 Units in Three Days, Filling Initial Allocation

• Between the afternoon of February 7th and the morning of February 10th, Ram Truck received more than 8,000 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel orders, which quickly filled the initial allocation for the exclusive powertrain
• First round of Ram 1500 EcoDiesel orders account for more than 50 percent of the total order mix
• Special order rate nearly twice the corporate average – an all-time high
• Overwhelming response attributed to best-in-class 28 MPG with 9,200 lbs. of towing capacity and strong consumer demand for exclusive light-duty diesel
• Actual customer orders for the Ram 1500 EcoDiesel take priority over dealer stocking orders


On the heels of EPA's certification of 28 MPG, Ram Truck opened the initial order allocation for the 2014 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel to receive a flood of orders from dealers across the nation. More than 8,000 trucks equipped with the fuel-sipping engine that packs 420 lb.-ft. of torque have been placed-just over 50 percent of the total mix. Even more surprising is the amount of orders already paid for by customers- twice the corporate average of sold customer orders on a truck that customers have yet to test drive.

"The Ram 1500 is the only half-ton truck available with a diesel, so we see this as incremental business by having the only truck that can offer best-in-class fuel economy of 28 MPG combined with 9,200 lbs. of towing capacity," said Reid Bigland, President and CEO - Ram Truck Brand, Chrysler Group LLC. "It's every truck manufacturer's dream to have this kind of initial order demand for a product. Fuel economy is the No. 1 request of half-ton buyers and the Ram 1500 EcoDiesel delivers without compromising capability."

The EcoDiesel-powered 2014 Ram 1500 has earned a 28-mpg rating from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the best highway-cycle test result ever achieved by a full-size, half-ton pickup. It also exceeds the EPA highway rating for the top-ranked small pickup. The breakthrough results mean Ram keeps the half-ton fuel-economy record set last year by the 2013 Ram 1500. Equipped with a 3.6-liter Pentastar V-6 gasoline engine, the truck earned 25 mpg highway, a rating that stands for model-year 2014. The Ram 1500 now owns the half-ton pickup segment's top two spots in the EPA's 2014 highway fuel-economy rankings.

Production of the 2014 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel began in February with a group of specialized trucks in popular configurations. Normal processes place the initial build under quality review to assure every truck meets or exceeds targets. Shipping is expected in March, keeping the planned delivery within the first quarter of 2014.

Although Ram has reached its first planned order allocation numbers in three days, customers who special order the new truck will have priority in the build. Orders for dealer stocking will be filled once sold customer orders are filled. The next order allocation of Ram 1500 EcoDiesel trucks will open in early March.

Ram 1500
Ram 1500 - the most recognizable pickup on the road - delivers best-in-class fuel economy of 18 MPG city and 25 MPG highway with a truckload of pioneering, fuel-saving systems including a fuel efficient and powerful 3.6-liter V-6 engine and first-in-segment technologies: TorqueFlite eight-speed automatic transmission, stop-start system, thermal management system, pulse-width modulation and active aerodynamics, including grille shutters and air suspension. For 2014, the Ram 1500 offers a new, 3.0-liter EcoDiesel engine that delivers an outstanding combination of best-in-class fuel efficiency 28 miles per gallon (mpg) - unsurpassed torque and up to 9,200 pounds of towing capability.

About Ram Truck Brand
The Ram Truck brand continues to establish its own identity and clearly define its customer since its launch as a standalone vehicle brand. Creating a distinct brand for Ram trucks has allowed the brand to concentrate on how core customers use their trucks and what new features they'd like to see. Whether focusing on a family that uses its half-ton truck day in and day out, a hard-working Ram Heavy Duty owner or a business that depends on its commercial vehicles every day, Ram has the truck market covered.

The Ram Truck brand has the most innovative lineup of full-size trucks on the market. Ram Truck has emerged as a full-size truck leader by investing substantially in new products, infusing them with great looks, refined interiors, durable engines and features that further enhance their capabilities. Truck customers, from half-ton to commercial, have a demanding range of needs and require their vehicles to provide high levels of capability. Ram trucks are designed to deliver a total package.


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  • 156 Comments
      Emilio
      • 10 Months Ago
      I put 48,000 miles on my truck last year. And average about 44,000 miles yearly. So you bet your sweat a__ this is going to benefit me. And I own a 2013 Ram V6.
      wsbfan
      • 10 Months Ago
      It may not make financial sense for most buyers to spend extra for a diesel to haul air around...but so what? Let this be a lesson to the automakers...just give the people what they're asking for...whether it's AWD hot hatches, a VW Transporter or a diesel Wrangler.
      OffRoaderWrangler
      • 10 Months Ago
      Who cares if it's cost effective? Really? It's not that much of a downside and you get a cool engine that sounds like a diesel and performs well. Is your 800W stereo worth $2500 option? Hell no....but people like good sound. Are the 20" upgraded wheels worth $1500? Maybe, but not many people buying NEW trucks are doing the math and finding out exactly which option makes them money back. Buy the car you want.
      TopGun
      • 10 Months Ago
      About bloody time - next…Diesel Wrangler!
      Car Guy
      • 10 Months Ago
      The idea of a diesel in a 1/2 ton truck sounds good on the surface until you start adding up all the costs. The diesel is a $8000 option on the 2500. I wonder how much it will be on the 1500? I'm not against diesel, but unless you really need the towing power (if you do you likely need the 2500 anyways) I don't see how how the expensive engine option plus higher fuel cost will save you anything verses the 5.7L.
        mitytitywhitey
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Car Guy
        8000 people and counting choose otherwise. There is no right or wrong for 100% of all situations. Some people will do better w diesel.
        postpast
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Car Guy
        It's not really about towing power, per se. It is mostly about towing ease and efficiently. When towing 10,000 pound a day around you will get much better FE and less stress on your engine than a gas truck, yet a 2500 is still a bit of overkill.
        threefortyduster
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Car Guy
        They haven't hidden the price at all. $2850 over a Hemi, $4000 over the Pentastar V6.
          Stephen
          • 10 Months Ago
          @threefortyduster
          And what everyone ignores is that you should always compare a diesel with the gasser that has 2 more cylinders. So this should only be compared to V8 gasser.
        Car Guy
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Car Guy
        Even at $2850, it's going to take you 8-10 years to make up the price difference over the more expensive engine and price of diesel fuel. You might gain some on depreciation but you also lose some on maintenance costs.
      throwback
      • 10 Months Ago
      Not surprising; diesel pick ups are popular, and diesel half tons are non existent. Chrysler should be able to make some hay while the other companies "gauge consumer interest"
        Brent Jatko
        • 10 Months Ago
        @throwback
        Auto makers are notoriously hidebound and conservative in terms of new product.
      loopless
      • 10 Months Ago
      The diesels get close to their EPA ratings in the real world. The gassers do not. My 2013 5.7 1500 Hemi is supposed to get 19mpg hwy. What a joke! Maybe downhill with a tail wind... avg is 13.0mpg with 80% freeway commuting. The Ford Eco boost is better, but only slightly - my neighbor reports 16mpg. RAM has a huge jump on Ford now. They can meet or exceed future MPG requirements without expensive aluminum construction.
        ndcart
        • 10 Months Ago
        @loopless
        I have a 2012 Crew Cab Ram, Hemi, 6 speed. I get a combine 17-17.5 mpg. That's pretty good. On the highway, I get 18-19 mpg. Now I can obviously get lower depending on how I drive it.
      snap_understeer_ftw
      • 10 Months Ago
      Pent up demand FTW!
      Geoff
      • 10 Months Ago
      With diesel costing over 20% more than gas and increased service and Maintaince costs what is the real advantage to the average person? A 28mpg diesel minus the 20% extra fuel cost alone is egual to a gas truck getting 22.4 mpg. Then if you figure in the increase service and maintaince costs there really isn't any advantage. If you need the greater towing capacity you should buy a heavy duty 1 ton or bigger truck.
        Brian
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Geoff
        If you don't understand WHY, it's because you've never owned a diesel vehicle before. For a truck there really is no comparison, a diesel is superior in every way that you drive and use a truck. And the mpg is the icing on the cake...typically approaching 30% increase. I also own a TDI VW Sportwagen, and the diesel motor is 70% of the reason I purchased it. It's such a perfect vehicle, best I've owned and I've owned way too many cars/trucks/suv's in my life. Now, I'm still waiting for my dream vehicle...having a family of 6 I can't spend $50k on a truck, I buy SUV's these days. So, I'm waiting for a Tahoe/Expedition/Armada/Tundra with an economical diesel and capable of towing 9000lbs. Is that really too much to ask??
          majortom1981
          • 10 Months Ago
          @Brian
          My dream is a forester or outback with diesel here in the US.
          A P
          • 10 Months Ago
          @Brian
          For SOME people who have trucks, the diesel is a good choice, so your statement is stupid. For the people that put a few dirtbikes in the back on the weekend or tow some jet skis or maybe a small boat, the V6 option in any truck is the superior choice. Oh and calling ANY VW perfect is so laughable as to be moronic. They have a terrible quality rep, and its deserved....for a car, a diesel is silly when there are so many good gasoline engine choices today. I saw a guy at Shell the other day getting pissed when he was fueling up his MB diesel on the way to work in his $2K suit and just a bit of filthy diesel fuel got on him. He was an idiot for not wearing gloves....
          montoym
          • 10 Months Ago
          @Brian
          @ majortom1981: And Subaru teased us with the possibility of a diesel a few years back as well. I've still been holding out for a diesel AWD sedan, hatch, or wagon (hatch and wagon preferred), but no one has stepped up yet. While I do love my German cars, I'd definitely be in the market for a Subaru if they offered a diesel in the Forester or Outback. Just too bad the outback is a bloated CUV now though, I much preferred the original concept. I did get to se a diesel Impreza race up Pikes Peak this past year though, looked like a fun little ride.
        Neez
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Geoff
        you must own a car i presume?? Diesels are great because all of the torque is very low in the power band, less than 2000rpm. This is especially great for towing, and diesels have better volumetric efficiency because they rev so much less to do the same job. So towing MPG is also much better than gas. Also, you only need a 1 ton truck to tow large loads. What about the guy that has to tow around 4,000lbs on a regular basis. The gas V6 will still struggle up hills with it's low 269ft-lbs of torque, even then you'll have to rev the crap out of it to get that. This diesel will make over 400ft-lbs below 2000rpm, it'll do it's job very well without a fuss. Not to mention get better mpg both unloaded and while towing. But really, if you are one of those guys driving around an empty pickup 99% of the time, just get the gas V6. However, if you really do use it to haul or tow mild loads. Then get the diesel or hemi. If you're towing near the 1500 max rating all the time, then get a 3/4 ton pickup.
        JaredN
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Geoff
        My estimate: We'll have to make some assumptions. 15,000 miles per year. Gas $3.5/gal and diesel $4.2/gal (those are the current numbers for my area from gasbuddy.com). Diesel costs $2850 more than the hemi. Hemi gets 15 mpg combined, diesel gets 23 mpg combined, so we'll assume those numbers. Fuel cost is then $3500 for the Hemi and $2739 for the diesel, for a difference of $760 per year. So payback is 3.7 years for diesel versus Hemi. The numbers wouldn't look as good for diesel vs V6, of course.
          JaredN
          • 10 Months Ago
          @JaredN
          montoym, of course that all depends upon assumptions. If the gas V6 gets worse mileage than its EPA rating and the Ecodiesel gets better mileage than its EPA rating (which seems to be the pattern for gas and diesel engines), the numbers might change.
          montoym
          • 10 Months Ago
          @JaredN
          @ JaredN: That's a very likely outcome for sure based on real world figures we see from existing diesels on the market. All of these numbers are fluid for sure and YMMV definitely. But, the only way to compare things is to use a solid set of data. At the time (accurate to real world or not), the EPA figures are all that we can reliably go on for fuel economy.
          Actionable Mango
          • 10 Months Ago
          @JaredN
          If you don't use your truck as a truck, get something else.
        N.O.
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Geoff
        Globally diesel engines have far bigger service intervals than gasoline engines. Ofcourse in the rest of the planet diesel fuel is actually CHEAPER than gasoline and thats why is rare to see a truck with a gasoline engine.
          JaredN
          • 10 Months Ago
          @N.O.
          In most of the world, gas is taxed higher than diesel.
        Ted
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Geoff
        At 9200 Lbs of towing this seems like a pretty big truck already !
      Lucky Stars
      • 10 Months Ago
      This was such a no brainer and will force all the others to put in a diesel. Also first to market with a good small truck especially diesel will kill it. Chrysler is really coming on, Jeep especially. Good job now work on the small trucks cuz there is not one
      Greg Aryous
      • 10 Months Ago
      It's all Early Adopters jumping in with both feet because they gotta have it... Emotion not reasoning!!! Lets see how this does when real competition from light wt Aluminum F150 with efficient n just as powerful 2.7 EcoBoost v6 with CGI block is available n getting similar MPG... At much lower cost!!! Update from WSJ... GM will build Aluminum trucks by late 2018... 4 Years behind Ford... Leaving fat Ram far behind...!
        mitytitywhitey
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Greg Aryous
        Average mpg of my EB F150 was 17. I have a hard time believing any EB V6 will get real-world mileage close to this 'fat ram'. The EB is fun, but this Ecodiesel is the first I would call 'efficient.'
          Greg Aryous
          • 10 Months Ago
          @mitytitywhitey
          Lots of tech updates in the 2.7 EB with dynamic engine controls based on "lessons learned" from the 3.5 EB... It's in a 700 lb lighter truck with improved aerodynamics and it 22% smaller... I just quote EPA mpg numbers as they are typically High Water Mark and your mileage may vary!
          montoym
          • 10 Months Ago
          @mitytitywhitey
          @ Greg Aryous: EPA figures are a high water mark for gasoline vehicles, but typically par for the course with diesels. Also, I'll believe the 700lb weight savings for the next F-150 when I see it. I do believe that in one specific, already overweight version of the F-150, it might add up to close to 700lbs. However, that's not going to be an across the board decrease and I'd put money on it being closer to 400-500lbs for most versions. Still good, but I'm not holding my breath for 700lbs to be the figure. Then there's the fact that curb weight doesn't affect highway fuel economy all that much, some to be sure, but not nearly as much as it affects city fuel economy. It takes a lot of power to get a lot of weight moving, once it's moving, it's easier to keep it going, basic Physics.
        Crusty
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Greg Aryous
        Any bicycle riders here? Aluminum is lighter but also stiff and harsh riding. I suppose those using the truck commercially it'll be okay, those whose use the truck for transportation may not like it.
      zepeda1
      • 10 Months Ago
      "We knew customers have been asking for it," Nick Cappa, Ram Truck communications officer, tells Autoblog. - well then what took you so long? At least Ram offers it now, still don't know why GM and Ford don't but they will be getting on the bandwagon soon enough.
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