The rescue of the eight Corvette display cars that were eaten by a sinkhole at the National Corvette Museum last week has begun. Unfortunately, two of the cars are so thoroughly buried in soil and debris that they have not yet been seen. At least a geologist on scene says that he has not seen any further movement in the cars since the Earth consumed them.

According to this news video from Bowling Green ABC affiliate WBKO, the museum is working with geologists from Western Kentucky University and a recovery team to save the cars. An opening is being cut into the side of the Skydome (where the sinkhole developed) to insert a crane, and holes are also being cut into the floor to fill with concrete in an attempt to stabilize what's left of the weakened floor.

When the crane arrives, the extraction team plans to remove the cars' wheels and attach the cars directly to the crane's straps in order to provide a more secure connection than other methods. The team hopes to have all of the cars removed in the next two weeks.

After the cars are removed, GM has promised to oversee their restoration in-house at its Mechanical Assembly facility, which restores all of the GM Heritage Collection vehicles. Scroll down to get an in-depth scoop on how the Corvettes will be removed.




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  • 60 Comments
      Ted & Linda
      • 10 Months Ago
      My wife and I were at the Corvette plant on July 2,1992 when the 1 Millionth Corvette came off the assembly line. It would be very sad if that one was not restored. Everyone in attendance that day recieved a certificate. I still have mine in a frame on the garage wall. It is very fortunate that this happened when the museum was closed and there were no injuries.
      PTC DAWG
      • 10 Months Ago
      Risky job, I hope they don't do any more harm to themselves.
      carguy1701
      • 10 Months Ago
      I just hope doing that doesn't damage them further.
        MistyGreen
        • 10 Months Ago
        @carguy1701
        Yea, you know what, let's just leave them there so we don't damage them any more.
          • 10 Months Ago
          @MistyGreen
          [blocked]
      carbon_rider
      • 10 Months Ago
      I hope AB has friends who will share video of the crane work.
      bojvette
      • 10 Months Ago
      pvo I am sure GM paid back Obama all the money that was given to G M
      robert
      • 10 Months Ago
      It's will be interesting to follow this story. I don't think they will be able to get them all out. The 1 millionth one should try to be saved if possible.
        Toneron
        • 10 Months Ago
        @robert
        "buried in 25 stories of ice for half a century" http://p38assn.org/glaciergirl/index.htm
      raress9596
      • 10 Months Ago
      As a rigger with 3 genereations of experience working in some of the worst situations in NYC I would have some concern for the workers safety. First off I would only send them down in a man basket suspended from the hook of the crane. Then again I would be worried. Whats to prevent a sinkhole from opening underneath the crane or even an outrigger from punching through the ground causing the crane to tip over?
        raress9596
        • 10 Months Ago
        @raress9596
        Oh and I am also the owner of a 2007 and 2013 Corvette! I can understand the importance of retrieving and restoring these cars but not at the expense of human lives.
      jayvelliot
      • 10 Months Ago
      Really it's just a corvette...just leave it where it is and build on top of it....mother nature did us a favor of trashing it so just leave it
        Basil Exposition
        • 10 Months Ago
        @jayvelliot
        Humm, maybe this isn't the website for you. Give this one a try, I am sure you'll find something you will like: http://www.etsy.com/browse/women/shoes
        Chris
        • 10 Months Ago
        @jayvelliot
        Why don't you do Mother Nature a favor and go play on an interstate during rush hour?
        motorprops
        • 10 Months Ago
        @jayvelliot
        And what do you think would be a good car? One of those over priced,under performing German tin boxes?
      m_2012
      • 10 Months Ago
      Pull out the 62 and the ZR1, leave the rest for filler.
      Keith
      • 10 Months Ago
      This story really sucked..........hahahaha.........I sleigh me.
        Robert
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Keith
        Yeah, that was pretty stupid, Keith. Maybe comedy is not your thing....
        QCRamAir
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Keith
        Rimshot? Nope, just crickets.
      dal
      • 10 Months Ago
      Mid life crisis mobiles in crisis! lol!
      bouleyl
      • 10 Months Ago
      Why don't we see any reinforcing bars sticking out of the concrete? Are the building codes that different in Kentucky?
        rspolo
        • 10 Months Ago
        @bouleyl
        A very good observation.. so I took a closer look. You are looking at the pictures as is a floor collapsed and the cars fell onto a lower level.. there was no lower level. It appears that the cars were on a slab-on-grade floor. If you go through the pictures and video you can see the wire mesh (also look at the back edge of the whole and you can see concrete hang from the mesh.. Slab-on-grade does not require re-bar as the entire load is compressive. Every state but three have a code based on the IBC (international building code) There is no national code.. even the National Electric Code NFPA70 is actually a guide written by a private company (and doesn't apply on Federal property!!). Massachusetts has their own codes for everything Mississippi Uses parts of the IBC for certain counties being rebuilt from storm damage And the only state without a building code (leaving it up to the counties) is... Missouri Kentucky on the other hand is up to date, using current or fairly current versions of all the international standards and could even be called progressive as it is one of the few states with any statewide residential code (they are on board with the IRC (international residential code))
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