Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost front three-quarter
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost front three-quarter
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost front three-quarter

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost front
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost front

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost side profile
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost side profile

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost rear
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost rear

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost headlight
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost headlight

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost wheel
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost wheel

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost mirror
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost  mirror

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost badge
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost badge

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost econetic badge
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost econetic badge

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost
  • Ford Fiesta 1.0-liter Ecoboost

Go figure. That's what we're saying after fleetwide fuel economy of new cars purchased in January rose during a month when green-car sales fell yet again.

January's new cars got an average fuel economy of 24.9 miles per gallon, which was up from 24.8 mpg in December and approached the all-time high of an even 25 mpg in both October and November, according to the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI). January's fuel-economy figure was also 1.2 percent ahead of the 24.6-mpg figure achieved in January 2013 and was a smidgen more than the 2013 total of 24.7 miles per gallon.

Granted, 0.1 miles per gallon doesn't sound like much of a jump, especially considering that the previous two January-to-January jumps were at least a full mile per gallon. Still, it's impressive given that January's US sales of hybrids, plug-ins and other advanced-powertrain vehicles fell almost 14 percent from a year earlier. The primary culprit of that decline was the Toyota Prius, whose four variants' sales were down 23 percent from January 2013. The implication here is that Americans may have been buying fewer gas guzzlers and more four-bangers. You can check out UMTRI's report here.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 16 Comments
      CoolWaters
      • 1 Year Ago
      Good. There's only 1 way to get Exxon to Diversify into Solar and Wind: BOYCOTT. Boycott, for American Jobs, Energy Independence and a Future for Humans on the Planet. This is the perfect example of Capitalism Not Working, unless you get a Forward Thinking CEO. Tillerson has to GO. And the Board should do their best to hire MUSK.
        Letstakeawalk
        • 6 Months Ago
        @CoolWaters
        Good luck boycotting Exxon. I for one, typically refuel Mrs. Walk's car at a Shell or a BP.
          EZEE2
          • 6 Months Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          'Mrs. Walk' LOL
        Spec
        • 6 Months Ago
        @CoolWaters
        Yeah, I think a pretty simple statement about it is "Don't give them your money!" Get an EV. I constantly see people spew stupid conspiracy theories about oil prices. I don't buy into those theories, it is just supply & demand, IMHO. But for the people that buy into those conspiracy theories . . . why don't they do something about it? Get an EV. Can't deal with range issues? Get a PHEV.
        EZEE2
        • 6 Months Ago
        @CoolWaters
        Ignoring the content of his post but just looking at the the logistics, it could be done (we also have to ignore all of the, 'but, the stations are usually franchised owned so you are hurting the little guy worse than the big corporation' stuff as well). If one gas station company were chosen, such as ExxonMobile, for a boycott, then people couple easily go to Shell and others. One could stick with independents,a s long as one knew where the gas came from. If there was even mild success, I suppose as a token bone to hungry dogs, Exxon could divert more money than what they already spend, toward additional research in wind and solar. Although I am still thrilled that big oil invented the lithium ion cell, plus pioneered much of what we have today with solar. On the flip side, however, they could spend more money without being hurt. Although their profit margins are razor then, in the end, the actual profit is large enough they could have a few more 'show piece' labs and power generation centers. Not saying they have to, in my opinion, but I wanted to work out the mental exercise on whether or not a boycott could accomplish anything.
      Jesse Gurr
      • 6 Months Ago
      They use sales weighted averages. The more a car sells, the more impact it has.
      mylexicon
      • 1 Year Ago
      The new Ford F-150 and the new Toyota Prius will both be released in 2015. It will be interesting to see what kind of impact they make on the UMTRI data.
      JB
      • 1 Year Ago
      How do EVs change the calculation?
        Joeviocoe
        • 6 Months Ago
        @JB
        Very drastically. Even a small number of EV sales can cause larger changes in the average, since they typically have around 100mpge
      Ryan
      • 1 Year Ago
      We still need more plug-in vehicles and battery EVs to help improve that number much faster.
      Technoir
      • 6 Months Ago
      Imagine if everyone drove 40mpg cars; the insane amount of gas that could be saved.
        EZEE2
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Technoir
        I am the last person to criticize a 'want' purchase over a 'need' purchase (I am a right winger after all, I believe in freedom and diversity of thought), however, there do seem to be many impractical purchases when it comes to vehicles that adversely affect a buyer's finances. And this is on something that will lose value and eventually have to be replaced. My business fusion (a 2012 with a standard 2.5 liter engine) averages 29mpg (it had been over 30 for over a year, bu traffic has sucked lately). The fusion is comfortable for 4 and can handle 5 in a pinch. As I look out the window of this Starbucks (I only get coffee so no one start on me about $5 latte), I see a gmc Acadia, Honda pilot, and Mercedes SUV, another Acadia....a four door Toyota truck just went by. I dunno, good for them if they enjoy their vehicles, but, I wonder how much of that was vanity, opposed to actual need? A large family that tows a boat? Okay...but as in the case of my sister, she had an escape and she Is a Single female, who's partner owns an avalanche. I think she had the 'utility' needs already covered. Please don't hurt me.
          Joseph Brody
          • 6 Months Ago
          @EZEE2
          Car purchases are all about image and vanity for most. Even If you get a Prius, there is a sertain am out of vanity about 50mpg. You can always buy a used fuel efficient car and not spend any money over your current car. That is how I went from 30MPG to 65 MPG.
          Technoir
          • 6 Months Ago
          @EZEE2
          I'm with you on that, as a member of the left wing conspiracy I also believe in freedom and diversity of thought. People make up stories to justify their purchases. The fact is, many people like big, heavy vehicles because it makes them feel safer, or stronger. They will tell you that it is to carry their family, baggage for 5 or a boat, but that is just rarely the real motivation.
        Ziv
        • 6 Months Ago
        @Technoir
        Technoir, you raise a good point. Once a car gets to 40 mpg you have cut most of the gas use. Most people drive about 1,000 miles a month and the chart below gives an idea of how little gas a 50 mpg Prius saves over a 40 mpg MKZ hybrid. mpg gallons used per 1,000 miles driven 10 100 20 50 30 33.3 40 25 50 20 60 16.6 80 12.5 100 10
      JB
      • 6 Months Ago
      So, they use MPGe numbers and harmonic mean/average?
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