Getting a thumbs up from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is priceless – just ask Toyota. It's right up there with the Tesla Model S gaining support from Consumer Reports in the wake of four fires.

A pilot program at NASA's Kennedy Space Center has found that electric vehicles driven by employees are reducing greenhouse gas emissions at a much higher rate than expected. "The numbers are 10 times better than we thought we'd ever see," Frank Kline with Kennedy's Sustainability office told redOrbit. "No one's ever done a pilot where you get actual numbers. It's always been estimates only."

NASA is following an executive order that all federal agencies reduce greenhouse gas emissions. By 2020, the agency wants to accomplish a 12.3-percent reduction and the EVs are playing their role. The executive order looks at everything the agency is doing, including actions somewhat outside their control such as gases produced by an airliner transporting a NASA employee somewhere or emissions from an employee's car during a daily commute. To affect some of the employee driving, NASA launched a test program to encourage employees to drive EVs. Ten Kennedy employees are able to charge their cars at work for free, and just need to fill out a spreadsheet each day documenting their trips.

Emissions caused by manufacturing the EVs at automaker plants aren't taking away the environmental gains from these cars, NASA says. "The average car puts out a pound of carbon dioxide per mile," Kline said. "We're reducing that by 3/5ths by letting you plug in at the Kennedy Space Center."


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  • 28 Comments
      Rotation
      • 10 Months Ago
      Fellow greenies, my sources are telling me that a hazmat truck is attending to a Model S in a parking lot in Cupertino. I'm not saying the car is unsafe or anything and frankly it's probably just a coolant leak or something insignificant like that. But the markets may react poorly to this in the short term, so use this information as you wish.
        Rotation
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Rotation
        It's nothing. There is indeed a chemical spill team there and I saw a bucket of rags that were used to mop it up, but it had to just be coolant because no one seems to give much of a crap now. There is a white Model S, it had a broken front left suspension, it kind of looks like it was in an accident, but it also appears the problem happened while the car was parked in a parking spot head-in, so it's unclear how the suspension broke. Anyway, they cleaned up the spill and now 6 people are trying to figure out how to properly secure the Model S to a flatbed. Tow truck drivers are apparently not rocket scientists.
        Grendal
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Rotation
        Thanks for the heads up, Rotation. I appreciated the thought since I still have a bit of TSLA stock.
        2 wheeled menace
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Rotation
        Meanwhile, 9999 other cars are also leaking fluid after crashes at this exact moment..
          2 wheeled menace
          • 10 Months Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          By buddies, do you mean spastically over-reacting anti-EV trolls? ;) It's important that we know the real truth about cars, but reporting on every possible Tesla crash or problem, when there is no real epidemic or pattern of events, is like throwing a juicy steak out for the trolls, to ensure they are well-fed and don't leave. ( oh, what would we do without them? ) With gasoline cars, a new model car often doesn't have problems reported about it the media until there are thousands, sometimes even tens of thousands of instances of the problem.
          Rotation
          • 10 Months Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          2wm: I never said any differently. This is the last time I try to help out my buddies on here with a heads up. All I got was pain.
          Grendal
          • 10 Months Ago
          @2 wheeled menace
          I said I appreciated it. Please do it again if you happen to spot something again.
      jeff
      • 10 Months Ago
      The study does not eve include the energy (and emissions) required to make the steam needed to refine crude oil into gasoline. It also does not include the fuel burned and emissions released to truck the fuel to the filling stations. And finally it does not include the emissions from powering those filling stations 24/7... If the study did include those very real items it would dramatically more savings...
      TIMMAH!
      • 10 Months Ago
      Well they're no rocket scientists? ... oh, yeah... nevermind...
      • 10 Months Ago
      It's great to see Obama government employees embracing the Nuclear and Coal industries, which power their "E.V.s". Now if we can get Congress to stop the EPA from closing more Power Plants and finishing the Pipeline.
        Grendal
        • 10 Months Ago
        As a conservative it should be obvious that getting the country off oil and gas is a good thing. Even if you don't believe in global warming, what about oil spills? The Gulf, Alaska, and even quite a few US rivers. https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gl=us&tbm=nws&authuser=0&q=oil+spill&oq=oil+spill&gs_l=news-cc.3..43j0j0i5l8j43i53.4039.5753.0.16580.9.8.0.1.1.0.139.991.0j8.8.0...0.0...1ac.1.uU5OAOyksA8 That will give you just a taste of the massive damage and toxicity.
          ElectricAvenue
          • 10 Months Ago
          @Grendal
          They don't believe in oil spills either. Just a liberal media conspiracy. :-) Global warming isn't a question of belief.
        Thunderbuck
        • 10 Months Ago
        Maybe I'm being oversensitive, but I detect a note of cynicism. The fact is, some of us "greenies" have made peace with nuclear energy and even coal-fired power is consumed more efficiently in an EV and produces fewer CO2 emissions than a conventional ICE-car.
        NestT
        • 10 Months Ago
        Florida produces 12k megawatts of electricity from natural gas, 4k from coal, 2k from nuclear, and the final 2% from renewables. The percentage from natural gas and renewables grows every year and the percentage from coal and nuclear decline every year. http://www.eia.gov/state/?sid=FL#tabs-4
        Ziv
        • 10 Months Ago
        This conservative embraces nuclear power and electric cars with a great deal of enthusiasm. Almost half of the people posting on GM-Volt dot com are conservatives. And SN, our cause is usually not served by injecting the empty suit into the conversation unless it is warranted. Please pick your battles a bit more carefully.
      Koenigsegg
      • 10 Months Ago
      *Nicolas Cage* Oh really?? You dont say??!!
      Dave
      • 10 Months Ago
      "The average car puts out a pound of carbon dioxide per mile," Kline said. "We're reducing that by 3/5ths by letting you plug in at the Kennedy Space Center." So, using power from the Kennedy space center grid, a SMALL BEV puts out about 40% as much CO2 as an AVERAGE car. How is that ten times better than expected?
        otiswild
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Dave
        47 MPG is average? http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2012/04/13/automobiles/Sorting-Out-the-Power-Grid.html?ref=automobiles
          Dave
          • 10 Months Ago
          @otiswild
          You didn't understand my post, apparently.
      jebibudala
      • 10 Months Ago
      I think they forgot the study of toxins produced by the mining of precious metals are 10x more damaging.
        BraveLil'Toaster
        • 10 Months Ago
        @jebibudala
        Oh? Which precious metals are those? The last time I checked, brushless AC motors (the kind you need to do regenerative braking) don't use rare-earth magnets at all. Nickel, which back in the 1960s and earlier, was smelted in such a way as to produce massive acid rain, is no longer being used in batteries at all, since NiMH batteries aren't as good as Li-Ion. Also, the methods used to smelt nickel have changed anyway. Lithium is hardly rare. Usually you just dig it up off the surface of dead alkali lakes. But creating that big battery for a Leaf does generate about as much CO2 as creating your car. Maybe that's what you're referring to? That's fine, since the amount of pollution generated by *driving* your car over 10 years is 10x as much as producing it. So I'm afraid you'll have to back up your claim. It appears to be bogus.
          DarylMc
          • 10 Months Ago
          @BraveLil'Toaster
          Hi Rotation and BraveLil'Toaster You can do regen braking with a permanent magnet motor no problems. Nissan Leaf uses permanent magnets with some precious metals. I'm quite sure every EV and hybrid motor other than Tesla uses permanent magnets. You can also do regen braking with an induction motor (no permanent magnets) such as used by Tesla. It's not the issue jebibudala makes it out to be. It is funny (actually not funny but I'm struggling to come up with the word for it) to hear people argue against the benefits of EV's on environmental grounds. Maybe he's a cycling advocate or he wishes to ban all motorised transport. Then I could partially understand such an attitude.
          Rotation
          • 10 Months Ago
          @BraveLil'Toaster
          Why can't you do regen on a permanent magnet motor?
          • 10 Months Ago
          @BraveLil'Toaster
          Must be the platinum-group metals used in the catalyzer in ICE cars - which BEVs neither need nor have.
        • 10 Months Ago
        @jebibudala
        You're just throwing fake numbers out there. Do you even know what a lithium ion is? It's a type of salt. Lithium ion batteries don't actually contain that much lithium metal, and are classified as non-toxic and landfill safe. Lithium is not rare and is not that difficult or energy intensive to extract. It is found in seawater; so the reserves are basically endless. Modern electric cars contain no heavy, toxic, radioactive, or rare earth metals. Seriously; this isn't the '80s with NiCd or NiMH batteries. A brushless AC motor is a solid chunk of metal with embedded copper coils.
        Gabe
        • 10 Months Ago
        @jebibudala
        Probably because they couldn't find a study "proving" that.
      paulwesterberg
      • 10 Months Ago
      NASA should also encourage employees to carpool.
      danfred311
      • 10 Months Ago
      Noone has ever done numbers before??? woot?
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