This might not come as a shock, but ultra-rare vintage cars are only going to get more expensive as time rolls on, particularly if there's a prancing horse on the car's nose. For example, in 2011, a Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa sold for $16.39 million. In February 2012, a 1964 250 GTO sold for nearly $32 million. Later that year, a 1962 250 GTO sold for $35 million. It was the most expensive car ever sold, making last year's 275 GTB/4 NART Spider and its $27.5-million auction price seem like a drop in the platinum-lined bucket. Now, there's been another high-dollar Ferrari sale.

An unrestored, 1957 250 Testa Rossa was reportedly sold for over $39 million, making it the most expensive car ever sold in the United Kingdom. Just for perspective, $39 million is about 28 LaFerraris or roughly 128 F12 Berlinettas. It's not the most expensive car ever sold, but it still represents a huge sum of money for a classic car. Part of the reason for chassis number 0704 - the car pictured above is 0714, which sold for a mere $12.2 million in 2009 - being sold for so much is down to its excellent provenance.

It made its race debut at the 1957 24 Hours of Le Mans, although it failed to finish. Phil Hill and Peter Collins racked up wins with this exact car in Buenos Aires and Sebring, according to the folks at Hemmings. Combining race wins by a former Formula One World Champion with an unrestored example of an extremely rare car (one of just 34 250 Testa Rossas ever built) makes its monumental sale price almost seem reasonable.

Following its racing life, the 0704 was donated to The Henry Ford Museum, outside of Detroit. It spent 30 years there, before being sold in 1997. According to Hemmings, the care by The Henry Ford team, which has a voluminous collection of rare and classic cars, is part of the reason this unrestored car remains in such good condition.

As this was a private sale, rather than through an auction house, it's unlikely we'll ever know the complete details behind the sale. The pricing information comes from The Daily Mail, which claims well-placed sources confirmed the price of 24 million pounds (that converts to $39.2 million as of this writing). The car was owned by Tom Hartley, Jr., a UK-based car dealer. Hartley admitted to selling the car, although it's unclear who the new owner is, according to Hemmings.


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  • 25 Comments
      Giorgio Taroni
      • 10 Months Ago
      Just a note, I like muche the windshield with squared top part, awesome design by Scaglietti in 1962, awesome
      Rollorokka
      • 10 Months Ago
      'Value' is a funny thing. What amount of necessaries, things, money someone is ready to give for a object they want, etc. But in this case that whole 'value' thing has gone really really wrong - badly. If E. Presley had owned it, Marilyn had been sitting in it with out any panties on and mr. Clinton have had a moment with Lewinsky girl in it's leathery embrace it still wouldn't worth 39,8 million. Crazy people those filthy rich. Fine car though.
      EZen
      • 10 Months Ago
      I don't get it. You paid too much to use it and also too much for it to be an investment. Somebody just paid a ton of money to look at this in person.
      LJV
      • 10 Months Ago
      I feel like if you buy it for $40 Million you can afford to have a exact replica made to drive around in. Kind of like how celebrities never actually wear their real million dollar jewelry outside the house.
        jonnybimmer
        • 10 Months Ago
        @LJV
        At $40 million, this is more of an investment/status symbol than a driving machine.
      thequebecerinfrance
      • 10 Months Ago
      Some people have too much money. Nearly 40 million$ for a car is plain stupid. And else where people are against a minimum wage of 10$ an hour, go figure...
        graphikzking
        • 10 Months Ago
        @thequebecerinfrance
        I agree it's quite expensive. The only thing I think is that I'd feel too nervous to actually drive this like it's supposed to be driven. It's a work of art really and its not common for standard painted artwork to sell for 2,3,5 or even 8 million to art collectors. I just can't see spending that much money on something that I really can't enjoy. Even artwork, I'd rather buy a $5million villa on the coast somewhere and watch the sunrise/sunset each day and have a new work of art every single day.
        Aaron N
        • 10 Months Ago
        @thequebecerinfrance
        Most of these cars are driven. This could very well be driven at a historics race.
      MeSoAsian
      • 10 Months Ago
      Lipstick
      Giorgio Taroni
      • 10 Months Ago
      For those who say it does not worth to race among classic cars, how much cost a F1 car on the grid line? Question of insurances and moonies
      WesCrumby
      • 10 Months Ago
      This car is absolutely stunning.
      vi_per
      • 10 Months Ago
      Its nice but not that nice. More brand hype than anything else.
      Feurig
      • 10 Months Ago
      Wow, it looks fantastic. Pretty much factory fresh.
      timber
      • 10 Months Ago
      Everything is beautiful but the inside of the hood is fantastic. No plastic covers are required to make the inside look good. Just the testarossa and the beautiful throttle bodies (or carburettors perhaps)
      JF GeSchmidtt
      • 10 Months Ago
      A gorgeous car, amazing provenance, beautiful livery, and a lot of dough. The fact that this car exists and is a sensational that it is, is enough, $39 million not withstanding.
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