"Everything for Norway" is that country's motto, but too much might not be a good thing when it comes to Norway's electric-vehicle incentives. The plan in Norway is to shower extensive perks on the first 50,000 electric-vehicle buyers as a way to take advantage of the country's cheap and relatively healthy hydroelectric power. The twist is that that number may be reached by mid-2015, about two-and-a-half years ahead of schedule, according to The Guardian.

The country provides perks like free parking, an extensive recharging network, use of bus lanes and free ferries and road tolls to push sales of models such as the Nissan Leaf and Tesla Model S. All told, EV subsidies in Norway are worth about $8,000 per vehicle.

As a results, EVs now account for about 10 percent of new-vehicle sales in Norway, and now there are about 21,000 EVs registered throughout the country. If you applied that number to the US on a per-person basis, you'd have more than 1.3 million registered EVs here. That as many as all the vehicles in New Hampshire.

Nissan made news last October when its all-electric Leaf became the best-selling vehicle (no matter what powertrain) in Norway, and in this the company was merely following Tesla's lead. The Model S was the Norway's most popular new vehicle in September.

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