Police in the European Union are allegedly hard at work developing a remote-stopping system that would allow authorities to disable a vehicle at a moment's notice, according to a report from AutoExpress. It's being developed by the European Network of Law Enforcement Technology Services.

The system is being developed in order to prevent high-speed chases, with a leaked report from ENLETS saying, "Criminal offenders will take risks to escape after a crime. In most cases the police are unable to chase the criminal due to a lack of efficient means to stop the vehicle safely." It's hoped that the system will be on the road as early as 2020.

Now, from a safety standpoint, bringing a car to a halt by flipping a switch or clicking a mouse certainly seems preferable to actions that put officers or other motorists in danger. Still, it strikes us rather heavy handed to install such a system in every vehicle when only a very small number are involved in high-speed pursuits.

What do you think? What would your reaction be to a system like this in the United States? Post your views in Comments.


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  • 100 Comments
      Scooter
      • 10 Months Ago
      Oh wow. So whats next, a shock collar for every citizen? I can see this technology falling into the wrong hands, even ending up deadly.
      svt2399
      • 10 Months Ago
      I get it...the concept...but no.
      RGT881
      • 10 Months Ago
      This is disgusting. Sure it should be an option to those that want it, but to make it mandatory is a blatant disregard of democracy and right of a law abiding citizen to refuse this module.
      knightrider_6
      • 10 Months Ago
      I wish there was a device to disable of the cell phone of the person in front of me, driving 10 below speed limit, in the left lane. Now that's a device I could love to have.
        Bernard
        • 10 Months Ago
        @knightrider_6
        Blast your horn at them. Just make sure there is room to their left and right first though, you wouldn't want the resulting jump and swerve injuring bystanders...
      Alim Osipov
      • 10 Months Ago
      such remote switch can be misused by government or abused by hackers anyone planning a bank heist will surely be able to disable it beforehand in a getaway car. so it's quite pointless
        pdwid
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Alim Osipov
        Will be used, not can. If it's there, it will be abused.
      Dark Gnat
      • 10 Months Ago
      In the future, action movies will be really boring: "Die Hard of Hearing - With a Bad Knee" will feature a scene where the bad guys get away, and John McClain simply pushes a button on his over-sized easy-to-see remote. The chase ends. The bad guys are caught, and McClain takes his afternoon medicine with applesauce.
      Graham
      • 10 Months Ago
      Carburetors FTW!
      domingorobusto
      • 10 Months Ago
      Lol, that won't be abused by any bored teenager with a laptop, not at all. /s But seriously, the potential for improper use of such a system is ridiculously high. History has shown that any high technology system is very vulnerable to exploitation. And that's exactly what will happen, people going around with a signal broadcasting to shut down every car they pass, just for a laugh. And what happens when the system fails, and because of an electrical glitch you car receives a false signal and shuts down while you're doing 70 on the interstate, and you suddenly lose your power steering (most of which is electric now) and your brake assist? This is a stupid idea. But thankfully I don't think it's anything more than pie in the sky think tank bs.
      Indubitably
      • 10 Months Ago
      If cops have it, so will criminals.
        b.rn
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Indubitably
        Cops already have it in the US with GM vehicles. I'm not aware of any issues with abuse. Doesn't mean it won't happen.
          sloanm101
          • 10 Months Ago
          @b.rn
          Negative. The cops do not have this power with GM vehicles, this is only under the authority of Onstar; therefore the vehicle has to be reported stolen by the owner.
      Shiftright
      • 10 Months Ago
      All the more reason to drive a vintage car
        Bernard
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Shiftright
        EMP can stop those too. If cops used EMP you'd be SOL.
      benjamin_braddock
      • 10 Months Ago
      Think-tanks come up with crazy ideas all of the time. The EU listens to those think-tanks, see how people react, then either proceed or scrap the idea. I can't see member states of the EU agreeing to it. Simple.
      Israel Isassi
      • 10 Months Ago
      Will the police cars be equipped with those as well?
        Jim R
        • 10 Months Ago
        @Israel Isassi
        Of course not. No government agency vehicle will be so equipped. How else are they going to catch the fleeing subjects? Remember--the police are better than you.
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