Subaru is giving its EyeSight driver assistance camera system a major upgrade for the 2015 model year with new color cameras, as well as reducing its size by 15 percent over the rather bulky original system.

Subaru locates its EyeSight hardware inside the vehicle at the top of the windshield, which is unlike most other camera-based systems that have their hardware mounted somewhere in the front fascia. The benefit is that these rather expensive components are protected from any detritus that may hit the car, but the original system's size ate up a chunk of the driver's outward view. Thus, the shrinkage should be appreciated by new owners.

The upgraded stereo cameras have a 40-percent longer and wider detection range than the original system's cameras, and their ability to see color allows the system to recognize brake lights at a speed differential of 30 miles per hour, instead of 19 mph before. And as before, EyeSight continues to offer adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning and pre-collision breaking that can slow the car automatically if an imminent accident is detected, even bringing the vehicle to a complete stop.

Along with the upgrades to EyeSight, Subaru is adding several new radar-based safety assist systems, as well. Blind Spot Detection uses side- and rear-mounted radar to detect traffic in the car's blind spot, while Lane Change Assist uses the same tech to display a warning in the side view mirrors if a car is coming, and a new Rear Cross Traffic Alert system can detect vehicles up to 23 feet behind the car.

Subaru says it will also be offering EyeSight on more models than before, though aside from mentioning that the new system will be available on cars sometime in 2014, stopped short of mention which ones specifically and when. Scroll down for the official press release.
Show full PR text
SUBARU DEBUTS NEXT GENERATION EyeSight™ SYSTEM
• Technology to feature on more Subaru models
• New Color Camera Based Driver Assist System
• Also debuting are Blind Spot Detection, Lane Change Assist and Rear Cross Traffic Alert
• Nine out of 10 current Eyesight purchasers would recommend the technology


Cherry Hill, N.J. - Subaru of America, Inc. has announced the debut of a new and improved version of its popular EyeSight™ driver assistance system. The new system now features color stereo cameras that deliver an approximately 40 percent longer and wider detection range, brake light detection and can now fully function when the speed differential between the Eyesight equipped car and another vehicle is up to 30 mph, up from 19 mph. The current generation Eyesight system earned the highest rating given by the Insurance Institute of Highway Safety (IIHS), superior, when the IIHS conducted it first test of accident avoidance technology last year.

Combining safety and convenience features, the Subaru EyeSight system is one of the most affordable crash avoidance technologies available in the U.S. market. On sale for almost two years in the U.S. the system has been widely praised by safety experts and customers. Research shows that nine out of ten Subaru customers who purchased the EyeSight system would recommend it and more than half say that the system has helped avoid an accident.

Also debuting in Subaru models later this year are three additional technologies; blind spot detection, lane change assist and rear cross traffic alert. These new systems will be introduced on Subaru's product line-up starting in 2014.

Eyesight Features
The new Eyesight uses two color cameras developed by Subaru and functions more smoothly and has a quicker reaction time. EyeSight is mounted inside the car on the upper edge of the windshield and the housing for the new Eyesight system has been made 15 percent smaller. Locating the system within the vehicle reduces the potential for damage that could occur in bumper-mounted systems. The EyeSight system processes stereo images to identify the vehicles traveling in front, as well as obstacles, traffic lanes and other items. The video information is relayed to the EyeSight computer, which is also networked with the car's braking system and electronic throttle control. EyeSight is also capable of detecting pedestrians in the vehicle's path and can activate in order to mitigate or even avoid the collision. Under certain circumstances, Eyesight is able to bring the car to a complete stop, thus avoiding a collision.

The Eyesight system integrates adaptive cruise control, pre-collision braking and vehicle lane departure warning. At relative speeds under 30 mph, EyeSight's Pre-Collision Braking System can detect vehicles in the car's path and, if the driver has not applied the brake, the system can do so to slow the vehicle or bring it to a full stop to help avoid the potential collision. Pre-Collision Braking is always on in the background to act as a second set of eyes for the driver. It can also be turned off temporarily for off-road or rough road travel.

Lane departure warning monitors traffic lane markers and lines and can detect if the car begins to wander outside the intended lane without a turn signal being used, or begins to sway within the travel lane. Using the turn signal cancels the warning.

Adaptive Cruise Control is intended for freeway use and can maintain a safe distance from the vehicle in front, braking or accelerating the car to maintain the driver-selected target speed and traveling distance. Adaptive Cruise Control operates from 1-90 mph and can fully bring the vehicle to a stop if the system "locks on" to a vehicle ahead. As an added convenience, Adaptive Cruise Control assists the driver in "stop and go" traffic by maintaining distance from the vehicle ahead.

New Technologies for 2015 Model Year

Blind Spot Detection
This driver assistance technology senses cars coming up in the vehicle's blind spot and if the turn signal is on, it alerts the driver not to change lanes. The driver is warned by a flashing light on the side view mirror and the alert stays active until the car in the adjacent lane is in view. Subaru BSD uses radar sensors on the side and rear of the car.

Lane Change Assist
The lane changes assist system warns the driver of a fast approaching vehicle on either side of the car. It only flashes an alert in the side view mirror when the turn signal is engaged and has a range of 230 ft.

Rear Cross Traffic Alert
Rear cross traffic alert uses rear facing radar to detect vehicles approaching from behind on either side of the vehicle such as when reversing out of a parking space at the mall. The radar sweeps 230 feet on either side of the vehicle to detect an approaching vehicle and triggers a warning light on the dash. The system can also detect cars up to 23 ft behind the vehicle.

Cautions
EyeSight, Blind Spot Detection, Land Change Assist and Rear Traffic Alert are not designed as a substitute for due care and attention to the road. The systems may not react in every situation. There are certain operational limitations, such as when weather conditions obscure the view of the cameras. Even with the advanced technology used, a driver with good vision and who is paying attention will always be the best safety system.

About Subaru of America, Inc. Subaru of America, Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd. of Japan. Headquartered in Cherry Hill, N.J., the company markets and distributes Subaru Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive vehicles, parts and accessories through a network of more than 600 dealers across the United States. All Subaru products are manufactured in zero-landfill production plants and Subaru of Indiana Automotive Inc. is the only U.S. automobile production plant to be designated a backyard wildlife habitat by the National Wildlife Federation. For additional information visit www.subaru.com.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 52 Comments
      AcuraT
      • 1 Year Ago
      I own a 2013 Subary Legacy with Eyesight. It already prevented an accident when a bad truck driver suddenly pulled out in front of me and started braking the car before I could slam on the brakes. I missed the truck by about a foot (stopping in time). The system works well. The only situations it has some problems are with exhaust with a car on a frigid day (the car thinks it is an obstruction and will attempt to stop the car on occasion - not consistantly) and when the road curves drastically and there is a tree in the middle of curve (visualize a tree on the side of the road, and the road turns at 45 degrees with a speed limit of 25 mph). When that tree comes up, every time, the car warns me of an obstruction ahead but does not apply the brakes - it figures out that the tree is not in the way before you get too close. Overall, we like this system a lot and would recommend it to anyone who is considering a Subaru (GM's system in the Cadillac ATS is very similar).
      Kevon
      • 1 Year Ago
      I just want the adaptive cruise control...when you drive 100 miles a day the system really cuts down on fatigue.
      Hardt Richard
      • 1 Year Ago
      Gen Y says "driving" is the distracting part.... they prefer to use their cell phones instead of driving. I am a senior engineer in an R&D and working exactly on systems like these. How to remove the distractions from driving, we realized that Gen Y thinks driving is the distracting part and requires too much attention... there you go folks... I always watch people while I am driving to see what they're doing and I've seen girls taking selfies while driving and almost rear ended me, and despite very close calls she still kept taking selfies thereafter.
        Fred
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Hardt Richard

        Just thinking about this system when I get my next Subaru, and realized that there is something else that could be added.

        I don't think it would be too difficult to add a SD card on one of the cameras and use it as a dash cam.  Would be a great additional feature as most of the hardware is already there.

        Fred
        • 8 Months Ago
        @Hardt Richard

        Just thinking about this system when I get my next Subaru, and realized that there is something else that could be added.

        I don't think it would be too difficult to add a SD card on one of the cameras and use it as a dash cam.  Would be a great additional feature as most of the hardware is already there.

        axiomatik
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Hardt Richard
        So you are watching other people inside their cars instead of the road ahead of you? You may think you are a good driver, but there will always be distractions.
      Viet Vet
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is a must have for all drivers and should come with an automatic insurance saving. Too bad it's only in the expensive models.
        Jasonn
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Viet Vet
        You can get it on the premium Outback and Legacy, which are the middle trim levels. Around $27,000 sticker price. That is very cheap compared to how much you have to pay to get a similar system on a Cadillac or a Volvo.
        vc-10
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Viet Vet
        It's coming down in price though. The 'City Safe' system VW have in the Up (already a cheap car) is only £225 in the UK ($373 US currently) although that's only operational at low speeds, using lasers and a single camera. The Golf 7 has radar-guided cruise control, with front assist, on all but the basic 'S' and Bluemotion models. It's becoming more and more common, which is great.
      Steven J
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have an Explorer that has adaptive cruise and blind spot monitors. In the 3 years I've owned it (living in the Midwest) the cruise has refused to work about a half dozen times because the sensors were too dirty. Also it has rained heavily enough that two times the blind spot monitor system was unable to "see". When this happened, the system was smart enough to illuminate both left and right mirrors to let me know that it wasn't working. I think everyone would benefit from these aides.
        icemilkcoffee
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Steven J
        So I guess the Subaru's behind the windshield camera mounting does make sense.
      LegacyGT
      • 1 Year Ago
      Putting the cameras inside the windshield makes all the sense in the world. (Wondering when SUVs and wagons will put their backup cameras inside the rear glass.) But the bulky cameras in Subarus system are not only obtrusive but they make the sun visors about half the normal size. Adding a fancy safety system is nice. But it should not compromise a basic safety system (like sun visors). If the driver isn't blinded, maybe he won't need eyesight.
      BillB
      • 7 Months Ago


      Great that Subaru offers this system -  it can protect up to 30mph. However, Volvo offers a better system called  CitySafety - it can protect you for speeds up to  31mph and uses both laser and camera to detect obstacle + offer pedestrian detection which Subaru doesn't.

      JaredN
      • 1 Year Ago
      These threads never fail to bring out dishonest, sanctimonious idiots. Here is the reality: you're not as good a driver as you think you are. If you've been driving for more than a year, then there was a time when you were inattentive and strayed from the center of your lane. There was a time that you got closer than you should have to the car in front of you. You've driven when you were tired. You've driven when you weren't feeling well. You've driven when your mind was on work, or school, or the argument that you had with your spouse or child. You've driven when you were concerned about your sick child, spouse, or parent. There were times when you spent too long looking down at the car's controls (stereo, heater, wipers, etc.). This is particularly true when driving an unfamiliar rental car. There were times when you spent too long looking for a house number or a street sign. In other words, there are times when we are not as attentive as we should be, even if we don't ever use our cellphone in the car. Systems that warn us that we are straying from our lane or getting too close to the car in front of us are a good thing. In the 40 years that I've been driving, I've been rear-ended twice by inattentive drivers. If their cars had been so equipped, then those accidents may not have occurred.
        hokkaido76
        • 1 Year Ago
        @JaredN
        THIS so much. At the end of the day NO ONE is a "perfect drive" 100% of the time. Those who think otherwise are full of it.
        1454
        • 1 Year Ago
        @JaredN
        Very well put. +1
        rsholland
        • 1 Year Ago
        @JaredN
        Couldn't have said it better. Thanks.
        Bernard
        • 1 Year Ago
        @JaredN
        I watch my rear view mirror like a hawk and always stop short just in case I need to pull forward away from a car that won't stop behind me.
          Stephen
          • 1 Year Ago
          @Bernard
          I can safely say that you are not telling the truth. Noone "always" does something. You aren't a computer. Saying you "never" or "always" is an indication of over confidence.
      Stephen
      • 1 Year Ago
      So, instead of them being hidden in the front where they can have dirt and other things cloud there view, they are now going to put them in plain view all the way at the top of the windshield... where the wipers can't wipe, and thus will still have the same visibility issues when the windshield is covered with dirt, snow, etc. By the way, if you NEED a system such as this, then you shouldn't be driving in the first place.
        Phil Klaerner
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Stephen
        This system is not needed but for the people that utilize this system it improves safety. This system made me drive better, because I didn't want to hear it beep at me all the time. I thought I was a good driver till I realized how much I wandered in the lane and didn't use a blinker. I concluded I was a dangerous driver. I drive long distances for work and work nights. this system keeps me alert and focused on the task at hand driving. In Stop and go driving it is a god send set it and forget it really. It is really hard to override the system especially when the system is active. the care will take away throttle and brake if you try to do one of those unsafe nascar passes when the care is on the left going slow and a gap is closing on the right with another car in front. so this system has made me a better driver in the end and safer. In my opinion if you don't have a system like this you are not as safe a driver.
        brandon
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Stephen
        Who said this is a "need"? Also, I wish more such cars were equipped with systems like this because the majority of people *do need it* to keep from running into me while lamebooking or texting. Since the government isn't going to do anything to get stupid drivers off the road, at least the OEM's are trying to limit their impact. Also, I'm fairly certain that none of these systems work in inclement weather. I know for a fact that most explicitly advise against using anything, even as simple as cruise control, when not in dry conditions.
          Stephen
          • 1 Year Ago
          @brandon
          You missread and missunderstood what I was talking about. I never said this was a "need," simply said that if you NEED a system such as this then you shouldn't be driving. Obviously if you just a kid or something like that then this might be something you WANT on your list. For some it is a nice option, but I hope it never becomes mandatory and forces me to pay more for a system that does exactly what my eyes and brain does. But more importantly to the flaw in this design that I was trying to point out... just because the weather is sunny and dry does not mean your car isn't dirty. If they had placed this in an area where the wipers reached then the area could be cleared off for the most part, even while driving down the road, making these effective any day. For example: it just snowed around here and although it is a sunny day, there are still cars with salt all over the tops of their windshields where the wipers don't reach rendering this equipment ineffective, and making people who have gotten used to stuff like this and now somewhat rely on it that much more dangerous on the road.
      Greenman Wood
      • 1 Year Ago
      As SkyNet inches ever closer to reality. Wait until the police, whenever they wish, will be able to override your commands to your autonomous vehicle, locking you in and directing you to the nearest precinct for convenient apprehension...
        hokkaido76
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Greenman Wood
        Take off the tinfoil hat buddy.........
        flychinook
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Greenman Wood
        So your main complaint with this tech is that it makes it harder to be a fugitive?
          Bernard
          • 1 Year Ago
          @flychinook
          Did you bad mouth my political party? Because it looks like your 3rd cousin is FB friends with a terrorist, putting you and your family on international watch lists. We're going to have to bring you in for questioning...
          axiomatik
          • 1 Year Ago
          @flychinook
          @Greenman Your concern is misplaced, and you put too much emphasis on the wrong risks. In the US alone, people drive almost 3 Trillion miles every year (yes, Trillion with a capital T). No matter how well you train the drivers, even if they spend 80 hours every year on further training, there is no way for all of the drivers in the US to stay ever vigilant over 3 trillion miles. It will never happen. People will get tired, people will get distracted, people will make bad decisions. If your wife is in labor and the child is coming immediately, then call an ambulance; they can get you to a hospital much more quickly and much more safely than a stressed and frantic father-to-be tearing through traffic like a madman. (and, by the way, for the very vast majority of child births, there is plenty of time to get to the hospital, and then wait around for hours and hours before the child is actually born) "There are already myriad examples of humans relying on machines where disaster is the result." Those numbers pale in comparison to the vast numbers of people who die due to human error. Every year over 30,000 people die on US roads. That is over 80 people every day. And they are not dying because of automated systems. They are dying because of people making bad decisions, or being negligent. The reason you fear automation is because it is a "new" risk, and your familiarity with the existing risks makes you blind to how deadly and pervasive they are.
      Indubitably
      • 1 Year Ago
      This system is pretty much intended for those drivers that are equivalent in driving skill to a potato. Not a bad thing i suppose...
      • 1 Year Ago
      [blocked]
    • Load More Comments
    Share This Photo X