Tesla Motors Supercharger EuropeWhile you can't drive a Tesla from the US to Europe, Model S drivers on both sides of the pond are seeing a robust Supercharger network. Today, Tesla announced that enough stations exist in central Europe to get a Model S from Amsterdam to cities 500 or 600 miles away in the Alps. As in the US, using a Supercharger is free.

The eight Superchargers are located in Germany, Holland, Switzerland and Austria trace a route along the German Autobahn (another six are in Norway) and Tesla says that by the end of March 2014, "50 percent of the German population will live within 320km [200 miles] of a Supercharger," with the rest covered by the start of 2015. The lowest-range Model S, the one with a 60-kWh battery pack, can go 230 miles on a charge, officially. Tesla says its Superchargers can add 170 miles of range in a 30-minute fill-up. You can see Tesla's future Supercharger plans here and find more details in the press release below.
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TESLA EXPANDS SUPERCHARGER NETWORK IN EUROPE

Newly energized routes enable free, convenient long distance travel across DACH region and the Netherlands

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

AMSTERDAM, the Netherlands – This week, Tesla officially opens new Supercharger locations connecting the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, and Austria. These newly-energized routes will enable Model S customers to enjoy free, convenient, 100 percent electric trips on the German Autobahn and to destinations in the Alps and elsewhere.

Tesla's first six Superchargers were energized in California in September 2012, with the first network of European Supercharger stations opening in Norway less than a year later. As of today, 81 Supercharger locations are energized worldwide, with 14 locations in Europe. More than 11 million kilometers have been charged by Tesla Superchargers and nearly 1.13 million liters of gas have been offset.

The accelerated energizing of Superchargers in Germany (Wilnsdorf, Bad Rappenau, Aichstetten and Jettingen), Switzerland (Lully), Austria (St. Anton) and the Netherlands (Zevenaar and Oosterhout) represents a new milestone in the expansion of the European network. In Germany, Superchargers connect Cologne, Frankfurt, Stuttgart and Munich. They also connect the German network to Amsterdam, Zurich, and Innsbruck. In the Netherlands, energized routes connect Amsterdam to Cologne and Brussels, and in Switzerland the stations connect Zurich and Geneva.

By the end of March 2014, 50 percent of the German population will live within 320km of a Supercharger, and 100 percent of the population will be covered by the end of the year.

The Tesla Supercharger is substantially more powerful than any charging technology to date, providing up to 120 kilowatts of DC (Direct Current) power directly to the Model S battery using special cables that bypass the onboard charging equipment. Superchargers replenish half a charge in about 20 minutes. Supercharger stations are strategically placed along well-travelled highways to allow Model S owners to drive from station to station with minimal stops. They are located near amenities like roadside restaurants, cafes, and shopping centers so drivers can stop for a quick meal and have their Model S charged by the time they're done.

Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements in this press release, including statements regarding future Tesla Supercharger locations, timing and capabilities, are "forward-looking statements" that are subject to risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements are based on management's current expectations, and as a result of certain risks and uncertainties, actual results may differ materially from those projected. Various important factors could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements, including potential difficulties in finding suitable Tesla Supercharger sites, negotiating leases or obtaining required permits for such locations, as well as the risks and uncertainties identified under the sections captioned "Risk Factors" and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results Of Operations" in Tesla's Form 10-Q filed on November 8, 2013. Tesla disclaims any obligation to update information contained in these forward-looking statements.


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  • 49 Comments
      Grendal
      • 11 Months Ago
      The solar strategy is similar to the roof of your house (efficient) solar versus the roof of your car (inefficient) solar.
      Marcopolo
      • 11 Months Ago
      Tesla's super charger network is a brilliant aid to promote sales of Tesla. The Super charger network, is only possible due to Tesla's phenomenal IPO success, so shareholders, like Grendal etc, can take a bow also ! Well done Tesla !
      Grendal
      • 11 Months Ago
      More Tesla news: Tesla won the Reader's Choice award for most innovative vehicle at the Detroit NAIAS. http://insideevs.com/tesla-model-s-wins-detroit-news-readers-choice-award-for-most-innovative-vehicle-at-2014-naias/ That's pretty hard to do for a company not based in Detroit to win a Detroit award. Congrats, Tesla. Eight Superchargers in Europe is pretty awesome too. It's refreshing to see a company follow through on its promises. They aren't perfect, but they are doing very well.
        Rotation
        • 11 Months Ago
        @Grendal
        It was the ELR last year. Oops! That just makes zero sense at all.
          m_2012
          • 11 Months Ago
          @Rotation
          Agreed. I think they pulled the wool over enough peoples' eyes to convince them it was a futuristic Caddy.
          Rotation
          • 11 Months Ago
          @Rotation
          Yeah, if the Tesla and ELR are to get the award in back-to-back years, it should have been the Tesla in 2013. Then in 2014 you can give it to the ELR. Or, since it isn't really very innovative, don't give it to the ELR at all. I would have given it to Tesla last year and BMW (i3) this year.
          Rotation
          • 11 Months Ago
          @Rotation
          m_2012: It's not innovative at any price. I don't get the argument that it has anything to do with the price. It's flashy, maybe that was it? Either way, it didn't deserve it.
          Grendal
          • 11 Months Ago
          @Rotation
          That is crazy. :) I suppose the Model S wasn't at last year's show. Or it took the public a year to decide the Model S was innovative. :)
          m_2012
          • 11 Months Ago
          @Rotation
          It got the award only because people didn't know what it costs then. If they knew it was a $80K Volt at the time, it would have likely won nothing. 5 year old technology doesn't really deserve to win an innovative award, does it?
        Grendal
        • 11 Months Ago
        @Grendal
        You are right. And I totally agree the i3 should get it over the ELR. It is Detroit, which is why it's surprising that Tesla won. It may have gotten a pass simply because it is an American company. ;-)
      sebringc5
      • 11 Months Ago
      Nice comments, I agree!
      Grendal
      • 11 Months Ago
      Tesla is still a publically traded company. There is only so much they can do before you get crucified by your investors. Giving away one of your advantages would not be accepted. Charging something, even if it is a little low, you could get away with. Free charging at the dealership is pretty basic. And then they are exclusive? You're not faulting them for that? If you're going to nail me for my hopes, how can you judge Tesla for excluding other vehicles when you don't know whether that has happened? No one may have asked Tesla yet. Can their car charge there even if Tesla says yes? I'm willing to give Tesla the benefit of the doubt and wait a couple years (until after the initial build out of the network) to see whether they will offset the electricity usage. They can only do so much and I believe building the network should have priority over building the solar. I've commented on that in the past. If they don't build the solar later I will be upset at them. I also expect further Supercharger build out even after they finish the map locations. Once the Model E hits the road the 6 slots that most locations have will not be enough to fulfill the needed demand. As opposed to a fee, maybe if another company is allowed to use the Supercharger network they have to help build the network larger. Then it would be teamwork and I couldn't see how investors would be mad about that. It's just good PR and advertising too.
      Rotation
      • 11 Months Ago
      Apple's chargers have a standard USB port on them. They are interoperable.
      bluepongo1
      • 11 Months Ago
      Forward thinking gov. & pop. = quick deployment > obstructionist gov. & pop. that lives in the past = falling behind even with an earlier start.
      Rotation
      • 11 Months Ago
      Huh? Business is business. You don't have to exclude others in order to not be crucified by your investors. I don't see gas car companies using proprietary filler nozzles. I agree free DCFC charging at a dealer is pretty basic. I don't see how it's all that much more basic than supercharging though. How can I not fault Nissan's chargers for being exclusive? I do fault them for being exclusive. But it is there nonetheless. They didn't wait for someone else to do it, they didn't seem to beg the US government to do it. You made a callous assertion about other car companies, one which is already wrong. How can I fault Tesla for excluding other vehicles when I don't know they have? Because I already know they have. They've used 3 different charging connectors, none of which are standard. That means no one can use infrastructure built for them, no matter who builds it. What if we had all 5 makers doing this right now? 5 different kinds of chargers? They put the solar right in that picture and haven't built it at virtually any of the stations. Whether you think they might build solar later, it's a greenwash now. That picture right there is a greenwash. Musk saying they will all be solar powered (he doesn't say that anymore) was a greenwash. I don't care who adds to the supercharger network. It uses a connector that most cars cannot connect to. They're not adding to charging for the community no matter who adds to it. We need more infrastructure that everyone can use. That means companies building standard infrastructure that owners of all brands can use. And that means we need cars that use standard infrastructure. Tesla is helping none of these things, the only way they even come close is with their J1772 adapter, and that still is the least thing they can do, the most selfish thing. It isn't all that much about the supercharger network. There will always be access-restricted chargers. It's about the other chargers, there should be publicly-usable fast chargers all over the Bay Area, like there are CHAdeMO. And that's most likely to happen when we have the largest spectrum of car buyers who can use them.
      Grendal
      • 11 Months Ago
      @Rotation I understand. My fault, I was being unclear. In building a national (emphasis on national) network of recharging stations the big manufacturers would likely ask for help. I will give you that if they lobbied for it that it would not be exclusive but inclusive though. The Government would insist on it if they built it. I also agree that it is a greenwash for now. I just expect solar in the future and I am actually happy they aren't focusing on it now. I can wait a few years if it helps to get more Superchargers out there now, both nationally and internationally (even though I would never use them internationally). Tesla gives or charges their customers for something like 8 to 10 adapters now. Even Chademo will have an adapter. So other manufacturers can have a Supercharger adapter if they are allowed use. That would help make the Supercharging plug the universal plug instead of the combo plug. I applaud your effort to want the system to be inclusive as opposed to exclusive. Tesla wanted it their way and while it is currently exclusive it is hard to fault them too much for pushing the boundaries when they are actually building something, exclusive or not. We'll see how they deal with it when someone comes to them for access.
      Rotation
      • 11 Months Ago
      It's a greenwash. Just listing your hopes for the future doesn't make it not so. I don't care if Tesla allows other manufacturers for a fee to use the network. I'm not talking about for a fee. We're all in this together. People who are helping each other don't charge each other. So no, it isn't at all hard to fault Tesla for being selfish in this way. 'I have no proof but if GM, Ford, or any other major manufacturer wanted a charging network they would have waited for someone else to do it or they would have lobbied the government to cover the costs in the name of progress.' It's true, you have no proof. And Nissan has put a charging network in place. They have DCFCs at many Nissan dealers for free use by Nissan owners. And from what I heard last week from BMW, I think you'll find BMW (and maybe even GM) are going to do the same for SAE combo.
      Grendal
      • 11 Months Ago
      "Also, it is doubtful that Tesla will allow other automakers the option of 'pay per charge'. But rather work with other automakers to build their Plugin cars to handle the SC network... and just like the Model S... pay for unlimited access at purchase time." That is what I meant but didn't explain it properly. Thanks for clarifying. I agree that is what Tesla will do except Tesla will charge a fee to the manufacturer. Tesla can't control how that manufacturer will set up their payment strategy to their customers. As for the farm, Tesla doesn't need to send the energy to each Supercharger. Tesla said that solar would offset whatever energy the cars use. Tesla can still offset the energy by putting the energy into the grid in Arizona. Tesla and Elon never said they would offset each Supercharger's specific use, just the amount. The farm idea makes that much more efficient and manageable. It might be a bunch of smaller farms throughout the country but the principle makes a lot of sense.
      Joeviocoe
      • 11 Months Ago
      solar panels on superchargers right now are a necessary greenwash. Even though it currently won't be done... Tesla needed to shut up the naysayers that were screaming about how Tesla EVs were just causing pollution from Coal plants... and that the Model S was a "Coal Car". Remember that fiasco? Right now, most EVs are subject to the grid. But a gesture was needed to show that there are options to persue even if the grid does not get cleaner.
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