• ETC
  • Dec 29, 2013
Halfway between Detroit and Chicago, there is a car museum that gives visitors a unique level of interaction with antique cars. The Gilmore Car Museum in Hickory Corners, MI has a driver's training class to teach people of any age to learn how to drive a Ford Model T.

From the crank starter to the column-mounted throttle control, this driving school teaches people all there is to know about driving and operating a Model T. Each class lasts about two and a half hours and is only open to 18 students. There are ten sessions planned for 2014 – twice a day on May 3, June 22, July 22, August 23 and September 14. The class costs $95 (or $85 for members), and it also includes a tour of the museum's automobile collection.

In addition to this driving school, the museum has plenty of exhibits on the property, and it's open all but three days per year (Easter, Christmas and New Year's Day) with free admission for school field trips and active military. Be sure to check out the Gilmore Car Museum's website or visit them on Facebook for more info.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 18 Comments
      Greg Najduch
      • 1 Year Ago
      The largest and some would say best history attraction in Michigan is The Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village in Dearborn, across the street from Ford's world HQ. They have all sorts of stuff on the history of the automobile in America, plus a whole bunch more on the pioneering efforts of the early 20th century. They also have several Model T's available to ride in with a driver. If you're visiting Detroit for any length of time, this place really is worth a visit!
        Steve Landon
        • 1 Year Ago
        @Greg Najduch
        I also highly recommend the Henry Ford. I did the Gilmore and Air Zoo on day one of my trip and did the Henry Ford, the F150 truck plant tour, and the Deeetroit auto show on day two. Day three was the Chrysler Museum (which is now not open except for certain events). The worse of the trip was probably the auto show... Underwhelming. Downtown Detroit was cool though with the people mover and all. Affordable parking, good eating.
      summazooma
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is one of the best automotive museums I've ever been to, with many of the very special cars, literally, in barns, representing the auto enthusiast ideal of "barn finds"
      Terry Actill
      • 1 Year Ago
      I have many happy memories from this place. "Mad Dogs and Englishmen" was a British car show there where I met a Mr Jensen in his Jensen Interceptor. He very kindly revved the engine as hard as possible. I almost bought an old Mini there too. Well worth a visit in summer if you find yourself in the area.
      budwsr25
      • 1 Year Ago
      This is a great place. They have added a few new buildings the past couple of years. The cars are all stored and displayed in vintage barns.
      artandcolour2010
      • 1 Year Ago
      I'd love to learn how to drive a T! My grandmother's first car, bought by herself at age 20, was a new '15 T runabout. I've always wanted to know what it was like for her to drive her first car.
        Teleny411
        • 1 Year Ago
        @artandcolour2010
        I would too. My great grandfather & his brother both had T trucks. These are just so cool.
      SloopJohnB
      • 1 Year Ago
      LOL….Kalamazoo and you too!
      Ragan Li
      • 1 Year Ago
      Richard Hammond could use one
      richard
      • 1 Year Ago
      As amazing as the auto collection is, the barns that house these cars are quite amazing in their own right. These magnificent buildings add another dimension to the auto experience.
      diffrunt
      • 1 Year Ago
      In 1948 I did the electrical part of a T roadster pickup resto. Won't ever forget my test drive.
    • Load More Comments